Posts Tagged “Artists”

Entertainment: Modern musicians lack integrity, Phil Collen adds.

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Karl Lean of Australia’s Heavy magazine recently conducted an interview with THE CULT singer Ian Astbury. A couple of excerpts from the chat follow below.

On the band’s heavy touring schedule:

Astbury: “It’s what we do. Since we started we’ve been live musicans, it’s always been live first. Recording, record deals, career and everything else came afterwards. It was really just about playing in bars to start with.”

“The band’s been rolling pretty consistently the past 7 or 8 years, and we just don’t want to stop. We’ve got momentum, we’ve got the album out and it’s going strong.

‘Choice Of Weapon’ did really really well. Previous to that, we did the Capsule collection, and previous to that, we did the ‘Love’ tour, which was great. That was kind of inspired by seeing Bowie do the ‘Low’ album, probably one of the first artists to go out and play an album, an iconic record in its entirety. So for us, we’re between albums right now, but we want to keep playing.”

On performing the “Electric” album in its entirety:

Astbury: “A lot these songs we’ve never played live.

“We don’t really think of this material as ‘old’; the action of playing live makes it all become fresh. It’s always like kind of an external perception of what we do; there’s memories and connections to a piece or body of work. So for us, ‘Electric 13’ is those ‘Electric’ songs brought alive again. We’re probably better musicans now than we were then; we’re at the top of our game right now. The shows have been amazing. The band’s on fire. It’s the most consistent lineup we’ve had. We’ve been playing together for 7 or 8 years, so it’s really tight.”

On offering plenty more than just a nostalgia trip for older fans:

Astbury: “We don’t identify ourselves as classic rock. To me, that term is like an old custodian. But this band is vital, it’s virile, aggressive, guttural. It can be sublime, it can be violent, it can be poetic. Within that is the essence of THE CULT. We have 9 studio albums and a history of working different genres — from hard rock to modern alternative post rock; very eclectic. We are still here.”

On the ups and downs of touring life:

Astbury: “Touring has always been a grind. It’s a tough lifestyle. It’s not like every day you get to be in Sydney, or Tokyo, or New York, or Paris.

“Touring is basically going from venue to venue. We just drove 10 hours from our last gig to here in Biloxi, Mississippi. Tomorrow we’ll do a 14-hour drive to the next show.

“The drives are really long, especially here in the States. And it’s the down times that you get into trouble. You try and keep your head together and not get into trouble.

“I much prefer driving to flying, though; all that sitting in airports. You don’t get offstage until after midnight, and you’ll have a flight at 9 in the morning. By the time you get cleaned up, you never sleep; you’re constantly tired, living on caffeine. That’s what it is.

“You chose the lifestyle and I’m not going to cry about that; it’s just the reality of touring. But once you do get on stage, it’s like catharsis, a release — that’s the time you really get to express yourself and it’s gratifying having an audience that has stayed with the band for so long.”

Read more from Heavy magazine.

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Karl Lean of Australia’s Heavy magazine recently conducted an interview with THE CULT singer Ian Astbury. A couple of excerpts from the chat follow below.

On the band’s heavy touring schedule:

Astbury: “It’s what we do. Since we started we’ve been live musicans, it’s always been live first. Recording, record deals, career and everything else came afterwards. It was really just about playing in bars to start with.”

“The band’s been rolling pretty consistently the past 7 or 8 years, and we just don’t want to stop. We’ve got momentum, we’ve got the album out and it’s going strong.

‘Choice Of Weapon’ did really really well. Previous to that, we did the Capsule collection, and previous to that, we did the ‘Love’ tour, which was great. That was kind of inspired by seeing Bowie do the ‘Low’ album, probably one of the first artists to go out and play an album, an iconic record in its entirety. So for us, we’re between albums right now, but we want to keep playing.”

On performing the “Electric” album in its entirety:

Astbury: “A lot these songs we’ve never played live.

“We don’t really think of this material as ‘old’; the action of playing live makes it all become fresh. It’s always like kind of an external perception of what we do; there’s memories and connections to a piece or body of work. So for us, ‘Electric 13’ is those ‘Electric’ songs brought alive again. We’re probably better musicans now than we were then; we’re at the top of our game right now. The shows have been amazing. The band’s on fire. It’s the most consistent lineup we’ve had. We’ve been playing together for 7 or 8 years, so it’s really tight.”

On offering plenty more than just a nostalgia trip for older fans:

Astbury: “We don’t identify ourselves as classic rock. To me, that term is like an old custodian. But this band is vital, it’s virile, aggressive, gutteral. It can be sublime, it can be violent, it can be poetic. Within that is the essence of THE CULT. We have 9 studio albums and a history of working different genres — from hard rock to modern alternative post rock; very eclectic. We are still here.”

On the ups and downs of touring life:

Astbury: “Touring has always been a grind. It’s a tough lifestyle. It’s not like every day you get to be in Sydney, or Tokyo, or New York, or Paris.

“Touring is basically going from venue to venue. We just drove 10 hours from our last gig to here in Biloxi, Mississippi. Tomorrow we’ll do a 14-hour drive to the next show.

“The drives are really long, especially here in the States. And it’s the down times that you get into trouble. You try and keep your head together and not get into trouble.

“I much prefer driving to flying, though; all that sitting in airports. You don’t get offstage until after midnight, and you’ll have a flight at 9 in the morning. By the time you get cleaned up, you never sleep; you’re constantly tired, living on caffeine. That’s what it is.

“You chose the lifestyle and I’m not going to cry about that; it’s just the reality of touring. But once you do get on stage, it’s like catharsis, a release — that’s the time you really get to express yourself and it’s gratifying having an audience that has stayed with the band for so long.”

Read more from Heavy magazine.

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Metal Blade Records has announced the signing of Italian metallers DESTRAGE. The band’s new album, “Are You Kidding Me? No.”, is complete and is scheduled for an early 2014 release. A trailer for the CD can be seen below.

Plans are currently in motion for videos in support of “Are You Kidding Me? No.”, as well as more extensive touring in 2014.

DESTRAGE formed in 2005 and has released two full-length albums so far: “Urban Being” in 2009, and “The King is Fat’N’Old” in 2010. Their animated live shows have taken them on tour all over Europe, and even over to Japan.

DESTRAGE opened for EVERY TIME I DIE and PARKWAY DRIVE this summer, and headlined a variety of Italian festivals, including Machete Fest, Rock In Riot, MAV Festival, and more.

Comments DESTRAGE on joining the Metal Blade roster: “It’s quite difficult for us to describe in few words our feelings about this moment. We just signed with one of the most important and historical metal label in the world, being welcomed as members of a big family; this is simply amazing!

“We’ve listened to Metal Blade artists since we were just fresh-faced kids and now we’re stoked to be part of such a great roster.

“We are really excited for the upcoming release and we can’t wait to bring this work on stage and tour around as much as we can.”

DESTRAGE is:

Paolo Colavolpe – Vocal
Matteo Di Gioia – Guitar
Gabriel Pignata – Bass
Ralph Salati – Guitar
Federico Paulovich – Drums

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Toby Cook of The Quietus recently conducted an interview with Erik Danielsson of Swedish black metallers WATAIN. A couple of excerpts from the chat follow below.

The Quietus: So the new album is due out next month. To say that it’s a radical departure is perhaps overstating it, but certainly even compared to “Lawless Darkness”, there is certainly, I think, a marked progression. Was it always the intention to create something that was so much more expansive and what were some of the challenges?

Erik Danielsson: I never really compare album to album like that — we never have — and I think that one of the most common things that people say when we release a new album is, “Oh yeah, it sounds very different.” So with that being said, progression has always been an inevitable part of this band. The whole idea of WATAIN and our artistic journey, so to speak, has been to go into the unknown, to explore the unknown within yourself, to go deeper and deeper into yourself, and that is something that we are getting better and better at and it’s happening perhaps more radically the older we get and the more we progress as artists. So that’s why I assume that the leaps between the albums are maybe getting bigger somehow, y’know? I mean, it’s really not something that we think a lot about when we are composing, but now I have to try to analyze it a bit when I’m doing interviews about and I’m doing it interview-to-interview so you’ll have to excuse me if I sound a bit abstract sometimes — but it’s a very interesting journey, going deeper and deeper.

The Quietus: I’d like to move away from the album a little bit now. I think that despite WATAIN‘s increasingly varied sound, you are inarguably still a black metal band. What does the “idea” of black metal mean to you and to WATAIN these days? To me, it seems the scene is in an interesting state of flux right now where you still have these “true cult” black metal bands as well as people like THE BOTANIST and WARDRUNA.

Erik Danielsson: I don’t know a lot about these “new” bands, to be honest — I don’t really keep track of things like that — but to me, it’s quite obvious that black metal is more than just a “sound.” It’s more than just a way of playing music. And, to put it very simply, I think that WATAIN is a very, very good definition of a black metal band. Meaning that our whole anatomy, our bones and our spine all relate to one same source: the Satanic ideal. It is diabolical music with a magikal and transcendental intent. And that to me is very much what defines a black metal band. I am really pleased that after almost two years of black metal being (on a larger scale) quite misrepresented by the media and by the bands that the media uses to represent black metal with, WATAIN is in an important position. We are one of the first bands through which many people will actually find out about and start to explore the word of black metal. I can’t say that that is particularly something that we have been striving to do, but it is certainly pleasing to me as someone who is deeply, deeply connected to that art form.

The Quietus: It’s interesting that you say that – and I couldn’t agree more when you call it an art form — there is something very unique about black metal, something profound that goes far beyond the music itself. How much does it annoy you that despite this a lot of people are still concerned with the murders, suicides and church burnings in Norway that happened over 20 years ago?

Erik Danielsson: Well, I mean, it was a very important period; it was, and there’s no escaping that. But, I think that for people who want to find out about black metal just on the surface and read a little bit about it, I’m fine with the fact that the first thing they will find out is that it’s an art form where very big buildings were set in fire; where a lot of people went to prison; and where a lot of people died. I think that’s a very good introduction to black metal, and if people dare to dig a little deeper after that they will of course realise pretty quickly that it is far more than that. But I still think that that early period is a good first step to be introduced to black metal; I really do.

The Quietus: One of the things with WATAIN is that the live show has always appeared to be such an important aspect of what you are about. I mean, I saw you at the Underworld in London several years ago and there is incredibly transcendental aspect to your performance; otherworldly almost doesn’t seem strong enough a phrase. As your popularity is steadily increasing, however, how much are you concerned about being able to maintain that atmosphere in bigger venues, without it just becoming a spectacle?

Erik Danielsson: Y’know, I like to think of our live shows as being a mystical experience, as a celebration of things not of this world. This might sound a bit closed-minded, but if an underground video director makes a documentary about shamans in the Amazonian jungle and he releases that on a VHS and a small number of people see it, they will be amazed and maybe take it to a few others. If the same documentary gets shown some years later on the National Geographic channel and a million people see it that will still not change what the documentary is about, it will still be that same holy source. And that’s how I like to look at it, that’s how I think I have to look at it order not to allow for peoples misconceptions to taint it, because that’s what it is, it’s a mystical experience in essence and nothing can really change that.

Read the entire interview at The Quietus.

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Niclas Müller-Hansen of Sweden’s Metalshrine recently conducted an interview with vocalist Sigurd “Satyr” Wongraven of Norwegian black metallers SATYRICON. A couple of excerpts from the chat follow below.

Metalshrine: The [new, self-titled] album [from SATYRICON] was recorded using analog equipment. A lot of bands seem to be doing this now. What’s your thoughts about it? I get the feeling that it’s kinda coming back.

Satyr: Well, I’m actually under the impression that it’s not coming back. I might be wrong, but my impression is that music throughout the last three or four years is disgustingly processed. I have talked to people that have worked with some of the true superstars. There’s this Norwegian production bureau called Stargate and they do a lot of stuff for Rihanna and so on and they are obviously very good at what they do, but I’ve talked to them as a musician and about sound and some of the things that I intensely hate about modern-day music productions and they explained to me that it’s what the artists want, management wants, record company wants, radio wants. They don’t want it to sound real, they want it to sound super processed and as a producer, that’s what you cater to, of course. I guess that’s the shocking part of it. I drove around once in a car with one of the instrument endorsers of SATYRICON and he played me some record from a very famous metal band, that was heavily processed. Everything sounded very powerful and ultra-tight, but to me, it was lifeless and dead. He was very enthusiastic and he was blasting it in the car. It was impressive, but I still hated it. I just said, “OK, fine,” but I thought to myself, “How can you not hear that this sounds so fake, so manufactured?” I was hoping that this SATYRICON record, working they way that we worked, not only would it communicate the emotions within the songs, the atmosphere, but also perhaps somehow contribute to what I’m hoping will become more of a trend, because that would be one of those good trends. For bands to do things more organic. That’s not something new to SATYRICON, but the difference is that it’s been so much hardcore and uncompromising on this record, compared to previous records, and that’s perhaps because we felt these songs needed it more than what we’ve done previously. But it was also because I’ve never felt so strongly about these things as I do now. When I had discussions about the record with A&R legend Monte Conner, and he’s a music nerd like me, and I said to him, “I think a lot of the sounds you’ve been hearing from metal bands in the last few years are gonna be tomorrow’s embarrassments, just like when people look at photos of themselves from the ’80s.” I think a lot of people a few years down the road, when they listen to their records from like 2012, are gonna go. “What were we thinking?” Then Monte said “I think you’re right. I actually think a few years down the road, a lot of the records that are popular today, are gonna be remastered to make them sound more analog,” which is the complete fuckup of some of the classic analog records that are being remastered in a way to make them sound more digital and sterile. I think the purist approach on the record helped create the record that it is. We thought that if we were gonna get this to come across the right way, and to have these songs provide that kinda authentic language, like we feel when we play them, we had to make the record, to a large degree, like it feels that you’re in the room with SATYRICON when you hear the record. That’s what we tried to do and I think we succeded. There’s a reason why it’s self-titled, because we really feel it defines the mentality and the musical philosophy of the band in terms of song writing and it shows what SATYRICON is about and it also points at the future. A part of what defines SATYRICON is a progressive attitude.

Metalshrine: You worked on it in a very isolated place for a long time. What do you draw inspiration from? Do you read a lot?

Satyr: I never stay in such a way that I stay there all the time. What I did was that I talked to an engineer friend of mine, where I know that he was using this old cabin lodge on his private property and it’s actually dated from 1550, because you can see it in the wood and from the building techniques. He had almost like an antique garage in there where he would set up his music and being in there is so cool. I said, “I love the atmosphere in here and to have something like this and do the SATYRICON record in,” and he said, “You can do that!” I was, like, “No, we can’t do a record in here.” But he just answered, “I think you could.” I started going through the process of myself, since having done this for so long and being used to be working in some of the best studios in the world, and then all of a sudden try to move into something that was actually made to either store food in or to keep goats or pigs in. We actually did most of the album in there. We were in the studio for about six months and five months were in there and we did six to eight months of pre-production and rehearsals in there as well, to get used to the place and feed off of the vibein the song writing and get acquainted and just feel at home. I’m very glad that I did that and I think a part of how I convinced myself into taking that chance, was based on experiences like the “Now, Diabolical” record, which I’m very pleased with, but there are things on the record that I would’ve wanted differently and I think part of why certain things didn’t come out they way I wanted them to was that I wasn’t where I needed to be mentally because I hated the place where I was working so much. In hindsight, I realized that it affected me more negatively than I understood at the time.

Metalshrine: So hadn’t you stayed in this cabin, it might have been a different-sounding album?

Satyr: Yes, definitely. Even the fact that everything was so primitive. There’s not much to do outside of recording, and I guess that it is actually quite nice to be at a place where there’s a sense of comfort and a possibility to have a little bit of variation during the day, but again, if you have something which is very rustic and primitive, it becomes very intense. You never have breaks, you just go, go, go, because there’s nothing else to do. That creates a bubble, and you find yourself living in a world within the world. To disconnect from reality when working with music is something I have great experiences with and I think that’s why a lot of people, whether they’re in music or journalism or whatever, find it constructive to do work during the night. I don’t think it’s the fact that it’s dark outside or some dark force connecting with your inner self, I just think it’s because the phone doesn’t ring, there aren’t as many new e-mails, there’s no spouse telling you to do things. It’s more quiet and you enjoy being in that state of mind where you undistracted can move on with your stuff and stay in that mind frame.

Read the entire interview at Metalshrine.

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Twinkle Twinkle Little Rock Star, the company which creates “beautiful lullaby versions of your favorite artists,” will release “Lullaby Versions Of Jane’s Addiction” on August 20 via Roma Music Group.

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“In other words, follow your inner compass,” says frontman Brandon Boyd.

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At: Guitar Center with Nic Harcourt is an ongoing podcast series created by Guitar Center that delivers unique music, and the stories behind it as told to host, Nic Harcourt, in the highest quality possible. The series features both exclusive performance videos and audio podcasts of these interviews that aim to tell the stories of the artists, their

The post Exclusive video premiere of Zakk Wylde performing “Blessed Hell Ride” for his “At: Guitar Center with Nic Harcourt” podcast. appeared first on Daily Heavy Metal News.

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Jason Price of Icon Vs.

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