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Brandan Schieppati, BLEEDING THROUGH frontman and owner of the training facility called Rise Above Fitness in Huntington Beach, California, recently answered more fitness and music-related fan-submitted questions via his YouTube channel. Check out all the clips below.

Having visited Europe and Australia for the last time, BLEEDING THROUGH will embark on its final U.S. tour in November.

BLEEDING THROUGH plans to hit South America in early 2014 and will conclude its career with a string of West Coast shows.

In a statement to BLABBERMOUTH.NET, Schieppati said about BLEEDING THROUGH‘s decision to disband: “We have been a band since 1999, and many of us just had life catch up with us in the way of marriages, kids, businesses and other endeavors. We can no longer dedicate what we need to to keep BLEEDING THROUGH going.

“Personally, I feel doing this band in a part-time fashion is not what this band is about and and feel like we have always been an all-or-nothing band. With that being said, and because we have established a worldwide following over the last 14 years, we want to give us and those people one more chance to share in this music together.”

BLEEDING THROUGH‘s latest album, “The Great Fire”, was released on January 31, 2012 via Rise Records.

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Karl Lean of Australia’s Heavy magazine recently conducted an interview with THE CULT singer Ian Astbury. A couple of excerpts from the chat follow below.

On the band’s heavy touring schedule:

Astbury: “It’s what we do. Since we started we’ve been live musicans, it’s always been live first. Recording, record deals, career and everything else came afterwards. It was really just about playing in bars to start with.”

“The band’s been rolling pretty consistently the past 7 or 8 years, and we just don’t want to stop. We’ve got momentum, we’ve got the album out and it’s going strong.

‘Choice Of Weapon’ did really really well. Previous to that, we did the Capsule collection, and previous to that, we did the ‘Love’ tour, which was great. That was kind of inspired by seeing Bowie do the ‘Low’ album, probably one of the first artists to go out and play an album, an iconic record in its entirety. So for us, we’re between albums right now, but we want to keep playing.”

On performing the “Electric” album in its entirety:

Astbury: “A lot these songs we’ve never played live.

“We don’t really think of this material as ‘old’; the action of playing live makes it all become fresh. It’s always like kind of an external perception of what we do; there’s memories and connections to a piece or body of work. So for us, ‘Electric 13′ is those ‘Electric’ songs brought alive again. We’re probably better musicans now than we were then; we’re at the top of our game right now. The shows have been amazing. The band’s on fire. It’s the most consistent lineup we’ve had. We’ve been playing together for 7 or 8 years, so it’s really tight.”

On offering plenty more than just a nostalgia trip for older fans:

Astbury: “We don’t identify ourselves as classic rock. To me, that term is like an old custodian. But this band is vital, it’s virile, aggressive, guttural. It can be sublime, it can be violent, it can be poetic. Within that is the essence of THE CULT. We have 9 studio albums and a history of working different genres — from hard rock to modern alternative post rock; very eclectic. We are still here.”

On the ups and downs of touring life:

Astbury: “Touring has always been a grind. It’s a tough lifestyle. It’s not like every day you get to be in Sydney, or Tokyo, or New York, or Paris.

“Touring is basically going from venue to venue. We just drove 10 hours from our last gig to here in Biloxi, Mississippi. Tomorrow we’ll do a 14-hour drive to the next show.

“The drives are really long, especially here in the States. And it’s the down times that you get into trouble. You try and keep your head together and not get into trouble.

“I much prefer driving to flying, though; all that sitting in airports. You don’t get offstage until after midnight, and you’ll have a flight at 9 in the morning. By the time you get cleaned up, you never sleep; you’re constantly tired, living on caffeine. That’s what it is.

“You chose the lifestyle and I’m not going to cry about that; it’s just the reality of touring. But once you do get on stage, it’s like catharsis, a release — that’s the time you really get to express yourself and it’s gratifying having an audience that has stayed with the band for so long.”

Read more from Heavy magazine.

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Karl Lean of Australia’s Heavy magazine recently conducted an interview with THE CULT singer Ian Astbury. A couple of excerpts from the chat follow below.

On the band’s heavy touring schedule:

Astbury: “It’s what we do. Since we started we’ve been live musicans, it’s always been live first. Recording, record deals, career and everything else came afterwards. It was really just about playing in bars to start with.”

“The band’s been rolling pretty consistently the past 7 or 8 years, and we just don’t want to stop. We’ve got momentum, we’ve got the album out and it’s going strong.

‘Choice Of Weapon’ did really really well. Previous to that, we did the Capsule collection, and previous to that, we did the ‘Love’ tour, which was great. That was kind of inspired by seeing Bowie do the ‘Low’ album, probably one of the first artists to go out and play an album, an iconic record in its entirety. So for us, we’re between albums right now, but we want to keep playing.”

On performing the “Electric” album in its entirety:

Astbury: “A lot these songs we’ve never played live.

“We don’t really think of this material as ‘old’; the action of playing live makes it all become fresh. It’s always like kind of an external perception of what we do; there’s memories and connections to a piece or body of work. So for us, ‘Electric 13′ is those ‘Electric’ songs brought alive again. We’re probably better musicans now than we were then; we’re at the top of our game right now. The shows have been amazing. The band’s on fire. It’s the most consistent lineup we’ve had. We’ve been playing together for 7 or 8 years, so it’s really tight.”

On offering plenty more than just a nostalgia trip for older fans:

Astbury: “We don’t identify ourselves as classic rock. To me, that term is like an old custodian. But this band is vital, it’s virile, aggressive, gutteral. It can be sublime, it can be violent, it can be poetic. Within that is the essence of THE CULT. We have 9 studio albums and a history of working different genres — from hard rock to modern alternative post rock; very eclectic. We are still here.”

On the ups and downs of touring life:

Astbury: “Touring has always been a grind. It’s a tough lifestyle. It’s not like every day you get to be in Sydney, or Tokyo, or New York, or Paris.

“Touring is basically going from venue to venue. We just drove 10 hours from our last gig to here in Biloxi, Mississippi. Tomorrow we’ll do a 14-hour drive to the next show.

“The drives are really long, especially here in the States. And it’s the down times that you get into trouble. You try and keep your head together and not get into trouble.

“I much prefer driving to flying, though; all that sitting in airports. You don’t get offstage until after midnight, and you’ll have a flight at 9 in the morning. By the time you get cleaned up, you never sleep; you’re constantly tired, living on caffeine. That’s what it is.

“You chose the lifestyle and I’m not going to cry about that; it’s just the reality of touring. But once you do get on stage, it’s like catharsis, a release — that’s the time you really get to express yourself and it’s gratifying having an audience that has stayed with the band for so long.”

Read more from Heavy magazine.

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Brian Giffin of Australia’s Loud magazine recently conducted an interview with vocalist Dez Fafara of Californian metallers DEVILDRIVER. A couple of excerpts from the chat follow below.

On the recording process for DEVILDRIVER‘s new album, “Winter Kills”:

“I decided that I didn’t want to spend more time away from my family than I have to,” he explains, “so I recorded at home in my own studio. It just gave me a more comfortable place for me to work where I didn’t have to be separated from them for these long bouts of time. I could go in there whenever I needed to and work for a few hours at a time, and then I could be at home spending time with the family. It just made, for me, the perfect work enviroment and made things more enjoyable and manageable for me.”

On the songwriting process for “Winter Kills”:

“I did this thing on this record called automatic writing. I would get the tracks from the rest of the band and then I would listen to one a dozen, fifteen times over, and then I would turn it off and just start to write. It’s almost like a trance state where you don’t even think about what you’re doing. I just found it to be a very comfortable, very natural way for me to write and to come up with some new ideas and a whole new way of working that I think keeps with the whole theme of this record.”

On “Winter Kills” representing a rebirth for DEVILDRIVER:

‘Winter Kills’ definitely represents something new for DEVILDRIVER. You know, every one of our records is like a new beginning for us. We’re always looking to strive for some new approach, something new to add. I think this is the strongest material we’ve ever done, and to me, the concept of ‘Winter Kills’ represents that break, that killing off what we’ve done so that we can move forward. That’s kind of why I did the COAL CHAMBER [reunion] thing, because I felt there needed to be closure so that I could move on from that, and so in the same way I think that this new record allows DEVILDRIVER to move forward again from what we did with ‘Beast’, from what we did with ‘Pray For Villains’.

“I’m pretty proud of the fact that no one’s ever really been able to pigeon-hole our band into a particular sound. We’ve done thrash metal , death metal, we’ve had a black metal influence here and there but we’ve never been pinned down into a category where you can just say, ‘Well, DEVILDRIVER sounds like this or that’.”

Read the entire interview at Loud magazine.

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Brendan Crabb of Australia’s Loud magazine recently conducted an interview with guitarist Mårten Hagström of Swedish experimental extreme metallers MESHUGGAH. A couple of excerpts from the chat follow below.

Loud: I’m sure like many people within the metal world you were actively following Randy Blythe‘s [LAMB OF GOD] recent trials and tribulations. What was your take on that situation?

Hagström: I was following what happened; I knew what was going on. I kept up to date on the Internet, but I really didn’t get too into it. It’s one of those things where it was fairly obvious what was going on, but it’s also one of those things where… It’s out of your hands, sort of. But the thing is, it’s scary, stuff like that. And as a travelling musician, or whatever you want to call it, every once in a while, stuff goes wrong. And it doesn’t have to be something like that; that’s a very unique situation, a very strange and tough situation for Randy, of course. But there’s shit happening all the time when you’re out on the road. You never really know what’s going to go down around the corner. It was a sobering thing, I think, for others, standing on the sidelines.

Loud: Although obviously not on such a level as that, but have you witnessed similarly concerning or dangerous behaviour at MESHUGGAH shows?

Hagström: No, not really. Sometimes, granted, you see stuff going down. But when you’re up there playing, you’re so focused on what’s going on onstage that you’re not always… You realize that there’s a moshpit going on or whatever, but it’s not like you’re consciously taking it in. But we’ve been around for a long time, so yeah, definitely, we’ve seen stuff on the road that’s scary. But you can’t think about it that way. Every occupation has a hazard, so it’s not often that anything happens. The scary thing about Randy‘s situation was how easy things can go wrong, and how bad and confused the consequences can get.

Loud: How much longer do you plan to tour in support of the latest record before you bunker down to write new material?

Hagström: End of the year. I think the last day of November is our last show for this album. So we’re basically looking to have some time off in December, and then we’ve been on the road with “Koloss” for like two years or something, on and off. So then I guess it’s about time to start writing new stuff again.

Loud: You mentioned that every album represents a slight progression for the band. In your view, what is the next step forward for MESHUGGAH creatively?

Hagström: I have no idea, and I never do. And I think that’s a good thing, ’cause people sometimes say that we’re pretty unpredictable, but I don’t really think we are, because we have a sound that’s been with us since at least like the “None” EP (from 1994), that’s very us. [laughs] It doesn’t really change all that much, but it’s still a progression, and what I mean by taking a step forward is that we’re still, we’ve been around now. We’re veterans in this game [laughs], and we’re still having fun with what we do, with experimenting with the music that we want to create. So as long as it feels like we’re making it better, and as long as it feels like we’re doing something that we can at least stand for and be proud of, that’s all that we ask.

You can read the entire interview at Loud magazine.

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Earlier this week, Tom Mann of Australia’s Faster Louder conducted an interview with STONE TEMPLE PILOTS bassist Robert DeLeo. A couple of excerpts from the chat follow below.

On the band’s split with lead singer Scott Weiland:

“It was plain to see nothing was going to get done anymore with these four members of STP. Nothing was going to get done. It was very clear from Scott‘s side of things, he doesn’t want to make music with us anymore. He didn’t want to tour anymore … I don’t think Scott really is into playing rock and roll music, and being in a rock and roll band, and being around us in particular. As friends or business partners. And it’s really sad, it’s sad to see.”

“It wasn’t an overnight thing [to fire Scott]; it was building for many, many years and I just think that we tried to do everything we could. We had a lot of great years with Scott, and I feel thankful we complemented each other’s lives immensely through the years. But friends don’t treat friends like that. I think Dean [DeLeo, guitar] and Eric [Kretz, drums] and myself just got tired of being treated that way. I got really tired of being treated that way.”

On working with LINKIN PARK‘s Chester Bennington in the new version of STONE TEMPLE PILOTS:

“It’s been great. It’s been a huge breath of fresh air, a lot more sanity, a lot more reasoning, and patience. Having a ‘stable’ singer, it’s new. It’s a very new feeling, and I don’t quite think Dean and Eric and I are used to it yet; it’s kind of surprising. Things are running very smoothly, it’s interesting because what I notice is I actually have a lot more energy onstage, because my day doesn’t involve wondering what’s going to happen that day.”

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Painting with blood seems to be all the rage nowadays. We've profiled the premiere blood-painter, Vincent Castiglia previously but now Behemoth is getting in on the blood art game. Frontman Nergal revealed recently that the cover of the band's forthcoming album, The Satanist will be painted with his blood.  Speaking to Australia's Heavy magazine, Nergal said of the painting: "I …

The post Nergal's Blood Used To Paint The Cover of BEHEMOTH's The Satanist appeared first on Metal Injection.

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Brandan Schieppati, BLEEDING THROUGH frontman and owner of the training facility called Rise Above Fitness in Huntington Beach, California, recently answered more fitness and music-related fan-submitted questions via his YouTube channel. Check out all the clips below.

Having visited Europe and Australia for the last time, BLEEDING THROUGH will embark on its final U.S. tour in November.

BLEEDING THROUGH plans to hit South America in early 2014 and will conclude its career with a string of West Coast shows.

In a statement to BLABBERMOUTH.NET, Schieppati said about BLEEDING THROUGH‘s decision to disband: “We have been a band since 1999, and many of us just had life catch up with us in the way of marriages, kids, businesses and other endeavors. We can no longer dedicate what we need to to keep BLEEDING THROUGH going.

“Personally, I feel doing this band in a part-time fashion is not what this band is about and and feel like we have always been an all-or-nothing band. With that being said, and because we have established a worldwide following over the last 14 years, we want to give us and those people one more chance to share in this music together.”

BLEEDING THROUGH‘s latest album, “The Great Fire”, was released on January 31, 2012 via Rise Records.




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After wrapping up a momentous summer that included a Billboard Top 10 debut for latest album, “Rescue & Restore,” and a mainstage spot on Warped Tour, August Burns Red is preparing to unveil another offering, a brand-new DVD entitled “Foreign & Familiar” to release this fall. The documentary chronicles the entire 18-month touring cycle behind the band’s breakout 2011 album “Leveler.” From headlining tours of North America, Europe, Japan and Australia – with stops in New Zealand, Taiwan, the Philippines, Malaysia, Thailand, Singapore and more along the way – “Foreign & Familiar” shows the globetrotting act doing what it does best in settings all over the world.

The post August Burns Red To Release “Foreign & Familiar” DVD appeared first on Daily Heavy Metal News.

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In a new interview with Bloody Disgusting, RAGE AGAINST THE MACHINE guitarist Tom Morello revealed that he is working on a new heavy rock album, to be released sometime in 2014. The effort, which may not be issued under the NIGHTWATCHMAN banner (unlike Morello‘s previous solo releases), “will be the first time since RAGE AGAINST THE MACHINE or AUDIOSLAVE that I’ve made a really big rock record,” Tom said. “It’s just time to rock and I’ve written a batch of songs with huge riffs and huge grooves. I’m working it out with my band now and we’re about five songs deep at this point, but we’re taking our time with it. It will definitely be a release-the-hounds effort.”

Morello‘s third folk-oriented album under the THE NIGHTWATCHMAN name, “World Wide Rebel Songs”, came out in 2011 via New West Records.

Tom recently joined the lineup of BRUCE SPRINGSTEEN AND THE E STREET BAND for a series of shows in Australia while veteran E STREET BAND member Steven Van Zandt was filming a new TV show.

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