Posts Tagged “Cult”


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Toxic Holocaust

Toxic Holocaust: apocalypse now

Chemistry Of Consciousness, Toxic Holocaust’s forthcoming first album in five years proves once again that thrash is at its most potent when a) you throw in a whole bunch of sonic pollutants, and b) you actually sound like some badass, nuclear-apocalypse-surviving warrior of the wastelands.

Featuring all manner of d-beats, caustic, black metal atmospheres, true punk venom and an air of genuine menace throughout, Chemistry… - released on October 25 via Relapse Records - is scabrous, coal-eyed thrash metal that that belongs more in the unholy, confrontational company of bands like Destroyer 666, Aura Noir and Nekromantheon than it does in the cleaner cut, more classicist purveyors of the form. Now head honcho Joel Grind has released the track Rat Eater like some particularly nasty flesh-ravaging virus and you can hear it exclusively right here. Thash till death! And beyond!

Check out Toxic Holocaust’s Facebook page here!

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Karl Lean of Australia’s Heavy magazine recently conducted an interview with THE CULT singer Ian Astbury. A couple of excerpts from the chat follow below.

On the band’s heavy touring schedule:

Astbury: “It’s what we do. Since we started we’ve been live musicans, it’s always been live first. Recording, record deals, career and everything else came afterwards. It was really just about playing in bars to start with.”

“The band’s been rolling pretty consistently the past 7 or 8 years, and we just don’t want to stop. We’ve got momentum, we’ve got the album out and it’s going strong.

‘Choice Of Weapon’ did really really well. Previous to that, we did the Capsule collection, and previous to that, we did the ‘Love’ tour, which was great. That was kind of inspired by seeing Bowie do the ‘Low’ album, probably one of the first artists to go out and play an album, an iconic record in its entirety. So for us, we’re between albums right now, but we want to keep playing.”

On performing the “Electric” album in its entirety:

Astbury: “A lot these songs we’ve never played live.

“We don’t really think of this material as ‘old’; the action of playing live makes it all become fresh. It’s always like kind of an external perception of what we do; there’s memories and connections to a piece or body of work. So for us, ‘Electric 13′ is those ‘Electric’ songs brought alive again. We’re probably better musicans now than we were then; we’re at the top of our game right now. The shows have been amazing. The band’s on fire. It’s the most consistent lineup we’ve had. We’ve been playing together for 7 or 8 years, so it’s really tight.”

On offering plenty more than just a nostalgia trip for older fans:

Astbury: “We don’t identify ourselves as classic rock. To me, that term is like an old custodian. But this band is vital, it’s virile, aggressive, guttural. It can be sublime, it can be violent, it can be poetic. Within that is the essence of THE CULT. We have 9 studio albums and a history of working different genres — from hard rock to modern alternative post rock; very eclectic. We are still here.”

On the ups and downs of touring life:

Astbury: “Touring has always been a grind. It’s a tough lifestyle. It’s not like every day you get to be in Sydney, or Tokyo, or New York, or Paris.

“Touring is basically going from venue to venue. We just drove 10 hours from our last gig to here in Biloxi, Mississippi. Tomorrow we’ll do a 14-hour drive to the next show.

“The drives are really long, especially here in the States. And it’s the down times that you get into trouble. You try and keep your head together and not get into trouble.

“I much prefer driving to flying, though; all that sitting in airports. You don’t get offstage until after midnight, and you’ll have a flight at 9 in the morning. By the time you get cleaned up, you never sleep; you’re constantly tired, living on caffeine. That’s what it is.

“You chose the lifestyle and I’m not going to cry about that; it’s just the reality of touring. But once you do get on stage, it’s like catharsis, a release — that’s the time you really get to express yourself and it’s gratifying having an audience that has stayed with the band for so long.”

Read more from Heavy magazine.

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Karl Lean of Australia’s Heavy magazine recently conducted an interview with THE CULT singer Ian Astbury. A couple of excerpts from the chat follow below.

On the band’s heavy touring schedule:

Astbury: “It’s what we do. Since we started we’ve been live musicans, it’s always been live first. Recording, record deals, career and everything else came afterwards. It was really just about playing in bars to start with.”

“The band’s been rolling pretty consistently the past 7 or 8 years, and we just don’t want to stop. We’ve got momentum, we’ve got the album out and it’s going strong.

‘Choice Of Weapon’ did really really well. Previous to that, we did the Capsule collection, and previous to that, we did the ‘Love’ tour, which was great. That was kind of inspired by seeing Bowie do the ‘Low’ album, probably one of the first artists to go out and play an album, an iconic record in its entirety. So for us, we’re between albums right now, but we want to keep playing.”

On performing the “Electric” album in its entirety:

Astbury: “A lot these songs we’ve never played live.

“We don’t really think of this material as ‘old’; the action of playing live makes it all become fresh. It’s always like kind of an external perception of what we do; there’s memories and connections to a piece or body of work. So for us, ‘Electric 13′ is those ‘Electric’ songs brought alive again. We’re probably better musicans now than we were then; we’re at the top of our game right now. The shows have been amazing. The band’s on fire. It’s the most consistent lineup we’ve had. We’ve been playing together for 7 or 8 years, so it’s really tight.”

On offering plenty more than just a nostalgia trip for older fans:

Astbury: “We don’t identify ourselves as classic rock. To me, that term is like an old custodian. But this band is vital, it’s virile, aggressive, gutteral. It can be sublime, it can be violent, it can be poetic. Within that is the essence of THE CULT. We have 9 studio albums and a history of working different genres — from hard rock to modern alternative post rock; very eclectic. We are still here.”

On the ups and downs of touring life:

Astbury: “Touring has always been a grind. It’s a tough lifestyle. It’s not like every day you get to be in Sydney, or Tokyo, or New York, or Paris.

“Touring is basically going from venue to venue. We just drove 10 hours from our last gig to here in Biloxi, Mississippi. Tomorrow we’ll do a 14-hour drive to the next show.

“The drives are really long, especially here in the States. And it’s the down times that you get into trouble. You try and keep your head together and not get into trouble.

“I much prefer driving to flying, though; all that sitting in airports. You don’t get offstage until after midnight, and you’ll have a flight at 9 in the morning. By the time you get cleaned up, you never sleep; you’re constantly tired, living on caffeine. That’s what it is.

“You chose the lifestyle and I’m not going to cry about that; it’s just the reality of touring. But once you do get on stage, it’s like catharsis, a release — that’s the time you really get to express yourself and it’s gratifying having an audience that has stayed with the band for so long.”

Read more from Heavy magazine.

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Finnish dark/doom metallers HANGING GARDEN will release a brand new EP, “I Was A Soldier”, on November 18 via Lifeforce Records. “I Was A Soldier” will be available as a strictly limited (200 copies) seven-inch single and as a digital EP.

“I Was A Soldier” track listing:

01. Winter To Summer Adverse
02. I Was A Soldier
03. Will You Share This Ending With Me (digital bonus track)

A teaser for the EP can be seen below.

HANGING GARDEN‘s third album, “At Every Door”, came out on January 28 in Europe and February 5 in North America via Lifeforce Records. Musically, the CD “has much more variety than the previous two, combining influences from CULT OF LUNA all the way to SIGUR ROS,” according to a press release. “When it comes to lyrical themes, HANGING GARDEN has always been about dystopic visions of the ouroborean fate that quite likely awaits man. Before, Matti Reinola was mostly responsible for the lyrics, but on this album they were mostly done by Toni [Toivonen, vocals].”

HANGING GARDEN is:

Jussi Kirves – Bass
Jussi Hämäläinen – Guitar, Vocals
Mikko Kolari – Guitar
Antti Ruokola – Drums
Toni Toivonen – Vocals
Nino Hynninen – Keyboards

hanginggardenep2013

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Cult of Fire today reveals a new, as-yet-unnamed track from the band’s forthcoming album for Iron Bonehead Productions. Check it out below

The post Cult Of Fire Streams New Song Online appeared first on Daily Heavy Metal News.

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Check out the full 86-song mix, list also features the Cult, Foreigner and more.

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September is turning out to be a great month for new metal albums. This week is no exception. Check out our full reviews, along with an article collecting short reviews of the latest albums from Anathema, The Charm The Fury, Cult Of Luna, Damnations Day, Deals Death, Felix Martin, Grave, Haken, Human Improvement Process, Mindcage, The Persevering Promise, Pinkish Black, Ringworm, Seidr, Stray From The Path, Subrosa and Wolvserpent.

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Nov 12th will see the re-issue of Yob’s cult doom metal classic “Catharsis” on the ten year anniversary of when it was first released. Profound Lore Records comments: “Out of print and hard to obtain for many years, ‘Catharsis’ is an album which marked a turning point in the career of one of the most important doom metal bands today. It is the album in which helped define the signature style of massive colossal doom that YOB are known for harnessing unto the masses.

The post Yob To Re-Issue “Catharsis” Album appeared first on Daily Heavy Metal News.

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Ozzy Osbourne will guest on Billy Morrison‘s (BILLY IDOL, THE CULT, CAMP FREDDY) radio show, “Billy Morrison’s Dirty Little Secrets”, next Wednesday, September 18 at 7 p.m. PST / 10 p.m. EST on TradioV.com. The show can be heard live via the Internet at this location.

BLACK SABBATH release a new DVD, “Live… Gathered In Their Masses”, on November 26 via Vertigo/Republic. The set will contain footage of the band’s April 29 and May 1, 2013 concerts in Melbourne, Australia in support of SABBATH‘s long-awaited reunion album, “13″.

The disc, which came out this past June, became the first SABBATH album in the band’s 43-year history to debut at No. 1 on the Billboard chart.

ozzybillymorrisonradio

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Toby Cook of The Quietus recently conducted an interview with Erik Danielsson of Swedish black metallers WATAIN. A couple of excerpts from the chat follow below.

The Quietus: So the new album is due out next month. To say that it’s a radical departure is perhaps overstating it, but certainly even compared to “Lawless Darkness”, there is certainly, I think, a marked progression. Was it always the intention to create something that was so much more expansive and what were some of the challenges?

Erik Danielsson: I never really compare album to album like that — we never have — and I think that one of the most common things that people say when we release a new album is, “Oh yeah, it sounds very different.” So with that being said, progression has always been an inevitable part of this band. The whole idea of WATAIN and our artistic journey, so to speak, has been to go into the unknown, to explore the unknown within yourself, to go deeper and deeper into yourself, and that is something that we are getting better and better at and it’s happening perhaps more radically the older we get and the more we progress as artists. So that’s why I assume that the leaps between the albums are maybe getting bigger somehow, y’know? I mean, it’s really not something that we think a lot about when we are composing, but now I have to try to analyze it a bit when I’m doing interviews about and I’m doing it interview-to-interview so you’ll have to excuse me if I sound a bit abstract sometimes — but it’s a very interesting journey, going deeper and deeper.

The Quietus: I’d like to move away from the album a little bit now. I think that despite WATAIN‘s increasingly varied sound, you are inarguably still a black metal band. What does the “idea” of black metal mean to you and to WATAIN these days? To me, it seems the scene is in an interesting state of flux right now where you still have these “true cult” black metal bands as well as people like THE BOTANIST and WARDRUNA.

Erik Danielsson: I don’t know a lot about these “new” bands, to be honest — I don’t really keep track of things like that — but to me, it’s quite obvious that black metal is more than just a “sound.” It’s more than just a way of playing music. And, to put it very simply, I think that WATAIN is a very, very good definition of a black metal band. Meaning that our whole anatomy, our bones and our spine all relate to one same source: the Satanic ideal. It is diabolical music with a magikal and transcendental intent. And that to me is very much what defines a black metal band. I am really pleased that after almost two years of black metal being (on a larger scale) quite misrepresented by the media and by the bands that the media uses to represent black metal with, WATAIN is in an important position. We are one of the first bands through which many people will actually find out about and start to explore the word of black metal. I can’t say that that is particularly something that we have been striving to do, but it is certainly pleasing to me as someone who is deeply, deeply connected to that art form.

The Quietus: It’s interesting that you say that – and I couldn’t agree more when you call it an art form — there is something very unique about black metal, something profound that goes far beyond the music itself. How much does it annoy you that despite this a lot of people are still concerned with the murders, suicides and church burnings in Norway that happened over 20 years ago?

Erik Danielsson: Well, I mean, it was a very important period; it was, and there’s no escaping that. But, I think that for people who want to find out about black metal just on the surface and read a little bit about it, I’m fine with the fact that the first thing they will find out is that it’s an art form where very big buildings were set in fire; where a lot of people went to prison; and where a lot of people died. I think that’s a very good introduction to black metal, and if people dare to dig a little deeper after that they will of course realise pretty quickly that it is far more than that. But I still think that that early period is a good first step to be introduced to black metal; I really do.

The Quietus: One of the things with WATAIN is that the live show has always appeared to be such an important aspect of what you are about. I mean, I saw you at the Underworld in London several years ago and there is incredibly transcendental aspect to your performance; otherworldly almost doesn’t seem strong enough a phrase. As your popularity is steadily increasing, however, how much are you concerned about being able to maintain that atmosphere in bigger venues, without it just becoming a spectacle?

Erik Danielsson: Y’know, I like to think of our live shows as being a mystical experience, as a celebration of things not of this world. This might sound a bit closed-minded, but if an underground video director makes a documentary about shamans in the Amazonian jungle and he releases that on a VHS and a small number of people see it, they will be amazed and maybe take it to a few others. If the same documentary gets shown some years later on the National Geographic channel and a million people see it that will still not change what the documentary is about, it will still be that same holy source. And that’s how I like to look at it, that’s how I think I have to look at it order not to allow for peoples misconceptions to taint it, because that’s what it is, it’s a mystical experience in essence and nothing can really change that.

Read the entire interview at The Quietus.

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