Posts Tagged “Dance Of Death”

According to IRON MAIDEN‘s recording engineer Tony Newton, the band’s two Brazilian concerts in São Paulo (September 20) and Rock In Rio festival (September 22) will be professionally recorded. It is not presently clear if the resulting footage will be made available commercially.

In a recent interview with the Turkish web site Hafifmuzik.org, MAIDEN singer Bruce Dickinson revealed that there will be no new studio album from the band in 2014. He did, however, assure fans that MAIDEN has plans to release a new CD, although most likely not before 2015.

IRON MAIDEN last month landed at position No. 1 on Billboard.com‘s “Hot Tours” list of top-grossing tours with $8.5 million in ticket sales from six performances on their summer tour of Europe. The shows were attended by a total of 121,280 fans, including a two-night, sold-out stand on August 3-4 at the O2 Arena in Lonon, England, where the band played to 27,000 fans. With totals added from this summer’s Europe dates, overall ticket sales from the tour top $42 million from 45 reported concerts.

MAIDEN‘s 15th studio CD, 2010’s “The Final Frontier”, featured 10 tracks that had an average running time of seven minutes and 40 seconds, with the shortest song, “The Alchemist”, clocking in at four minutes and 29 seconds, and the longest, “When The Wild Wind Blows”, lasting ten minutes and 59 seconds.

“The Final Frontier” sold 63,000 copies in the United States in its first week of release to enter The Billboard 200 chart at position No. 4.

IRON MAIDEN‘s previous album, 2006’s “A Matter Of Life And Death”, opened with 56,000 units to land at No. 9. This was a notable increase from the 40,000 first-week tally registered by its predecessor, 2003’s “Dance of Death” (which debuted at No. 18 on The Billboard 200 chart), and that of “Brave New World”, which moved 38,000 copies in June 2000 to land at No. 39 on The Billboard 200 chart.

“The Final Frontier” was IRON MAIDEN‘s fourth U.K. No. 1 album. The band previously topped the chart in 1982 with “The Number of the Beast”, in 1988 with “Seventh Son of a Seventh Son” and in 1992 with “Fear of the Dark”.

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Fan-filmed video footage of IRON MAIDEN ‘s entire September 10 perfomance at Austin 360 Amphitheater in Austin, Texas can be seen below.

The band’s setlist was as follows:

01. Moonchild
02. Can I Play With Madness
03. The Prisoner
04. 2 Minutes To Midnight
05. Afraid To Shoot Strangers
06. The Trooper
07. The Number Of The Beast
08. Phantom Of The Opera
09. Run To The Hills
10. Wasted Years
11. Seventh Son Of A Seventh Son
12. The Clairvoyant
13. Fear Of The Dark
14. Iron Maiden

Encore:

15. Aces High
16. The Evil That Men Do
17. Running Free

IRON MAIDEN last month landed at position No. 1 on Billboard.com‘s “Hot Tours” list of top-grossing tours with $8.5 million in ticket sales from six performances on their summer tour of Europe. The shows were attended by a total of 121,280 fans, including a two-night, sold-out stand on August 3-4 at the O2 Arena in Lonon, England, where the band played to 27,000 fans. With totals added from this summer’s Europe dates, overall ticket sales from the tour top $42 million from 45 reported concerts.

MAIDEN‘s 15th studio CD, 2010’s “The Final Frontier”, featured 10 tracks that had an average running time of seven minutes and 40 seconds, with the shortest song, “The Alchemist”, clocking in at four minutes and 29 seconds, and the longest, “When The Wild Wind Blows”, lasting ten minutes and 59 seconds.

“The Final Frontier” sold 63,000 copies in the United States in its first week of release to enter The Billboard 200 chart at position No. 4.

IRON MAIDEN‘s previous album, 2006’s “A Matter Of Life And Death”, opened with 56,000 units to land at No. 9. This was a notable increase from the 40,000 first-week tally registered by its predecessor, 2003’s “Dance of Death” (which debuted at No. 18 on The Billboard 200 chart), and that of “Brave New World”, which moved 38,000 copies in June 2000 to land at No. 39 on The Billboard 200 chart.

“The Final Frontier” was IRON MAIDEN‘s fourth U.K. No. 1 album. The band previously topped the chart in 1982 with “The Number of the Beast”, in 1988 with “Seventh Son of a Seventh Son” and in 1992 with “Fear of the Dark”.

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British heavy metal legends IRON MAIDEN this week landed at position No. 1 on Billboard.com ‘s “Hot Tours” list of top-grossing tours with $8.5 million in ticket sales from six performances on their summer tour of Europe. The shows were attended by a total of 121,280 fans, including a two-night, sold-out stand on August 3-4 at the O2 Arena in Lonon, England, where the band played to 27,000 fans. With totals added from this summer’s Europe dates, overall ticket sales from the tour top $42 million from 45 reported concerts.

MAIDEN‘s 15th studio CD, 2010’s “The Final Frontier”, featured 10 tracks that had an average running time of seven minutes and 40 seconds, with the shortest song, “The Alchemist”, clocking in at four minutes and 29 seconds, and the longest, “When The Wild Wind Blows”, lasting ten minutes and 59 seconds.

“The Final Frontier” sold 63,000 copies in the United States in its first week of release to enter The Billboard 200 chart at position No. 4.

IRON MAIDEN‘s previous album, 2006’s “A Matter Of Life And Death”, opened with 56,000 units to land at No. 9. This was a notable increase from the 40,000 first-week tally registered by its predecessor, 2003’s “Dance of Death” (which debuted at No. 18 on The Billboard 200 chart), and that of “Brave New World”, which moved 38,000 copies in June 2000 to land at No. 39 on The Billboard 200 chart.

“The Final Frontier” was IRON MAIDEN‘s fourth U.K. No. 1 album. The band previously topped the chart in 1982 with “The Number of the Beast”, in 1988 with “Seventh Son of a Seventh Son” and in 1992 with “Fear of the Dark”.

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A new nine-minute video clip featuring behind-the-scenes footage from IRON MAIDEN‘s “Maiden England World Tour 2013” can be seen below.

IRON MAIDEN last month landed at position No. 1 on Billboard.com‘s “Hot Tours” list of top-grossing tours with $19 million in ticket sales from 14 performances in 13 cities on their summer tour of Europe. The shows were attended by a total of 259,298 fans, including a sellout crowd of 55,531 at a football stadium, Friends Arena, in the Stockholm suburb of Solna, Sweden. Also included was a sold-out concert on May 29 at Lisbon, Portugal’s Pavilhão Atlântico.

IRON MAIDEN‘s August 3 show at London, England’s O2 Arena (with a capacity of up to 20,000, depending on the event) sold out in just 12 minutes, so a second show was added on Sunday, August 4. This was definitely the band’s last U.K. show this year as soon after they head off for a few selected USA shows before a massive trip around Latin America, including headlining Rock In Rio and national stadiums in Mexico, Chile and Argentina.

MAIDEN‘s 15th studio CD, 2010’s “The Final Frontier”, featured 10 tracks that had an average running time of seven minutes and 40 seconds, with the shortest song, “The Alchemist”, clocking in at four minutes and 29 seconds, and the longest, “When The Wild Wind Blows”, lasting ten minutes and 59 seconds.

“The Final Frontier” sold 63,000 copies in the United States in its first week of release to enter The Billboard 200 chart at position No. 4.

IRON MAIDEN‘s previous album, 2006’s “A Matter Of Life And Death”, opened with 56,000 units to land at No. 9. This was a notable increase from the 40,000 first-week tally registered by its predecessor, 2003’s “Dance of Death” (which debuted at No. 18 on The Billboard 200 chart), and that of “Brave New World”, which moved 38,000 copies in June 2000 to land at No. 39 on The Billboard 200 chart.

“The Final Frontier” was IRON MAIDEN‘s fourth U.K. No. 1 album. The band previously topped the chart in 1982 with “The Number of the Beast”, in 1988 with “Seventh Son of a Seventh Son” and in 1992 with “Fear of the Dark”.



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Iron MaidenThe Final Frontier
2010 Universal Music
Ray Van Horn, Jr.

It’s never easy being held to a standard when you’re the greatest metal band of all time. New work comes at a premium, usually in the form of scrutiny. In the case of Iron Maiden, there’s little more for them to accomplish at this point in their illustrious careers other than to enjoy the ride. Having all of its core principals intact for the fourth album in a row since Bruce Dickinson and Adrian Smith returned to the flock, it stands to reason Iron Maiden are in it for the pride.

The Final Frontier, like its predecessors A Matter of Life and Death, Dance of Death and Brave New World is not a grab you by the throat and rattle you from start-to-finish album like Powerslave, Piece of Mind or Number of the Beast. Those days are long gone and Iron Maiden, to their credit, haven’t sought to replicate them–wholly. As of The Final Frontier, that ethos changes. Borrowed nuggets, chords and melody lines are found all over this album. Albeit, Iron Maiden does a fantastic job of altering their scripts and giving The Final Frontier the benefit of their roles as elder statesmen conveying their sageness by concocting a new art within their of-late marathon compositions.

In other words, you’re best to treat The Final Frontier like a pet project and give it a number of spins before passing judgment. Like A Matter of Life of Death, this is an album destined for its share of critics as much as its regallers. That being said, the biggest compliment to The Final Frontier is its willingness to shoot from the hip at times and its purposeful strides towards reinvention. In all, this works to Iron Maiden’s fortune, because they give their listeners a ton to digest on The Final Frontier.

Kudos for the exquisite tom march of “Satellite 15…The Final Frontier” opening the album. It’s ingenius, it sets a thrumming precedent for Maiden and it builds high anticipation for the long journey of The Final Frontier. While the celestial theme of this album is inherent and insinuated, you will have to work your ears over at times to keep them floating in Andromeda.

For the nine-minute-plus “Isle of Avalon,” Maiden does the work for you (even with its Arthurian lore) as the quieted melody threads and hi-hat furrows in the opening few minutes build a launchpad and then rockets upon beautiful prog solos from Maiden’s triple attack of Dave Murray, Adrian Smith and Janick Gers. It’s not quite “The Loneliness of the Long Distance Runner,” but there’s parallels to be noted between the two.

In its own right, the galloping huzzah of “El Dorado” can be construed as a space trucker as much as it can be a grounded charge into the land of gold with echoes of “The Trooper” and “Run to the Hills” giving it leverage. While fans initially criticized “El Dorado” when previewed as a single, it mingles in nicely following the head-bobbing smacks of “The Final Frontier” portion in the opening track. Frankly, “El Dorado” is one of the most exciting and identifiable songs Maiden has done in recent memory.

“Mother of Mercy” and “Coming Home” are slower, methodic and well-birthed from Piece of Mind, Number of the Beast and even Killers if you listen carefully. “Coming Home” lyrically sounds more in league with Maiden’s Flight 666 DVD with Dickinson piloting his band’s plane around the world, so don’t expect everything on The Final Frontier to fall in line thematically. Instead, you’ll be spending time picking out threads of “Still Life” and “Revelations” at this point in the album.

There’s a reason for this ladle dipping on The Final Frontier, as Maiden traversed back to Compass Point Studios where many of their halcyon recordings were laid down. Reconnection is hardly the word here. The quick pick-up of “The Alchemist” feels reminiscent of “Back to the Village” from Powerslave as much as it does “The Prisoner” and “Gangland” from Number of the Beast. It’s an ankle-provoking toe tapper which is the fastest Iron Maiden’s been in some time.

It’s also the mark where The Final Frontier begins its quest for the ultimate odyssey, which presents the album’s most challenge. Nothing below 7 minutes each beginning with “Isle of Avalon” straight through, so make sure the coffee’s hot on your first spin. What you’re listening for the remainder of the swirling, crawling pace is some nifty soloing and a few signature adjustments. Example, the dirty classic rock bashing in the middle of “Starblind” or the progfest splicing the steadfast plod of “The Talisman” which rides on a time-true set of Maiden riffs, straight down to Steve Harris’ golden bass plucks.

“The Man Who Would Be King” could’ve been a serious hiccup if Maiden didn’t write in some outstanding tempo changes and gorgeous note scales on their extensive solo section. Also drifting a key shift on the song’s bridges, it all saves a song which pitter-patters through its incredibly nervous verses. Harris loses his guys many times on “The Man Who Would Be King” until the artistry of the song unites them again.

Bruce Dickinson should be regarded as a natural wonder because his chops are still hanging tough almost thirty years in association with a band he’s punished his throat for. Still able to peel off falsettos like nectarine skins, Dickinson’s return home in 2000 is one of the chief reasons Iron Maiden still has a pulse. Even with these seventh-innning stretch tunes Maiden favors lately, you’re mesmerized by Dickinson as a perpetual narrator.

The songs in the latter half of The Final Frontier are a virtual exercise and in some ways, they derail the excitment established by the first five tunes. It’s not because the epic songs lack heaviness, it’s because they lack constraint at times. Much as Iron Maiden pulls off a number of spiffy surprises, there’s a say-when factor that needs to be adhered to despite your standing in the music world.

It doesn’t mean the bobbing crunch in the second-third of “When the Wild Wind Blows” lacks conviction. Quite the opposite. It’s a strident trudge to the quietus finishing The Final Frontier on a whisper. By this point, however, The Final Frontier could’ve glossed up and trimmed down the lead-ins to the more fascinating dimensions Iron Maiden adroitly incorporates. Then we would’ve had quite the monster album on our hands.

Never easy to flag the masters in their court, because The Final Frontier would be considered gifted genius by anyone else but Iron Maiden. Despite the repetition and the grossly-hijacked chord progressions of albums past, The Final Frontier is still an enjoyable ride. It’s Maiden, for Christ’s sake! “Rime of The Ancient Mariner” remains the greatest metal epic written by the greatest metal band in history, but its success was only duplicated within the years it was conceived, i.e. “Alexander the Great,” “Loneliness of the Long Distance Runner” and “Seventh Son of a Seventh Son.” It appears Iron Maiden wants to reclaim their stature as supreme artisans on a War and Peace level. Unfortunately, War and Peace isn’t for everyone.

Rating: ****

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