Posts Tagged “Drummer Scott”

On September 24, Honduras rock journalist Alvaro Villatoro (a.k.a. Lemmy Simmons) of Hard Heavy conducted an interview with conducted an interview with QUEENSRŸCHE drummer Scott Rockenfield. You can now listen to the chat using the SoundCloud widget below. A few excerpts from the chat follow.

On the next QUEENSRŸCHE video:

Scott: “A couple of weeks ago, we finished two brand new music videos for the new record. We went down to Los Angeles and shot the next two videos.

“The next single, I believe, is going to be ‘Spore’. And then the follow-up single after that is going to be ‘A World Without’.

“So what we did is we shot a 10-minute movie of the two songs put together, and it’s really great. It’s a full scripted storyline, there were actors in the videos, and it’s very conceptual. And we do appear in the video as well. But it was really fun and really different, because it’s like a movie.”

On parting ways with original singer Geoff Tate and replacing him with Todd La Torre:

Scott: “I’ve gotta be honest. We just didn’t know what to expect when we made the decision to move on last year. And Todd has been perfect; I mean, it’s absolutely just perfect. He sings so great our old, great songs. Listen, we hadn’t done ‘Queen Of The Reich’ in years, and Todd stepped in and he just sings it — he just does it — and it’s just perfect. I can’t even tell you how excited we are about what’s going on for us right now having him in the band.”

On whether the band felt any pressure to release a new studio album as quickly as possible to compete with the Geoff Tate-fronted version of QUEENSRŸCHE:

Scott: “To be honest, we actually didn’t — we never felt any pressure to get a record out as fast as possible or to do anything to sacrifice the quality that we always had wanted to keep ourselves at. This record was a great example of that. Our focus was on just writing great songs and getting them to where we felt it was at the top of our game, so to speak, and we wanted to keep our level very high and challenge ourselves. And so we were gonna get the record done when the record was gonna be done.

“We were lucky, because the chemistry amongst the five of us now is so great that we just felt that we didn’t have any pressures — we knew we were gonna have a great record and feel really good about it. And I think the response is kind of the proof. The fans and the media have embraced the new record in such a high way; I mean, we’re getting almost 10-star reviews on this record all around the world. So for what that’s worth, I think that’s just the proof that we’ve done what our fans really had wanted us to be doing for a long time. I think they’re very happy that we’re back doing what we feel good about.

“We’ve been around for 30 years as a band, and we’ve made a lot of records, and some really great ones that I’m very proud of. I think this new record is a record that I’m proud of… It’s probably a record that I’m most proud for probably the last 20 years. So, for me, it’s really special and I feel really great about it. And we’re having a great time. We haven’t had a great time for a long time, to be honest; it hasn’t been very fun. I think this is now a turning point for us and we just feel really good. We’re energized and the fans are energized.”

On whether “Queensrÿche” signals a return to the band’s classic sound:

Scott: “I think so. I really do.

“In the last year that we started playing all these shows with Todd, our setlist is a lot of just our first five records — it’s all that great QUEENSRŸCHE classic stuff that we hadn’t played for a long time. And in doing that, I think that started to put us in kind of that mindset, that energy that we had back then, and the chemistry we had together. And so I think when we started making this new record, it was almost natural that we were kind of revisiting that feel for us. And I think this record does.

“I think, to me, if somebody asked me where I would place this record in our catalog in terms of time frame, I think this record fits right back in the days of, like, ‘Operation: Mindcrime’ and ‘Empire’ and ‘Promised Land’ — kind of like in the early Nineties when we were making those records. And I think this record feels like it’s very much a part of that era. And I’m proud of that. And a lot of our fans are telling us that as well.

“So I think that we did — we grabbed a lot of the great, old chemistry, and we made a record with that energy.”

Photos below from video shoot for “Spore” and “A World Without”.

queensrychevideosept20132

queensrychevideosept2013

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Four years since the band’s debut album, Calgary based Sentient is now back. The band is pleased to announce the addition of drummer Scott Tanner to the fold, who has been a member of Thorazine and Operation Wintermist. The boys hope to hit Calgary stages in the upcoming months and hope to see you out there to slam a few brews and get heavy

The post Sentient Working On New Album, Recruits New Drummer Scott Tanner appeared first on Daily Heavy Metal News.

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FU MANCHU guitarist/vocalist Bob Balch and drummer Scott Reeder have joined forces with former KYUSS bassist Scott Thomas Reeder in SUN & SAIL CLUB. Their debut album, “Mannequin”, will be released in early November via Satin Records.

The first in a series of video clips featuring footage from the “Mannequin” studio sessions can be seen below.

Said Balch: “In between FU MANCHU tours, I was writing all this material that was really frantic and dark. Lots of notes and strange chords.

“A lot of times I would go interview a guitar player for my site PlayThisRiff.com and come back inspired and full of ideas. Just to make Scott Reeder laugh I would send him a file to play drums on.

“Well, anybody who has seen FU MANCHU live knows Reeder is a monster behind the kit. So I would try to throw him some curveballs to trip him up. No such luck. Every riff I sent him he nailed. After a while, there was an album’s worth of stuff.

“I really wanted Scott Thomas Reeder to play bass on it. I love the work he has done in his recording studio too, so I figured that if we recorded stuff there, hopefully he’d dig it and play on it.

“I remember after the first take we walked into the control room and Reeder said, ‘I had an idea!’ He asked to play on it and I almost crapped myself. I don’t think I’ve ever said ‘Yes!’ faster.

“His bass lines are insane. Lots of drop-A stuff which is probably pretty hard on bass. He nailed it too!

“Once the bass tracks were in place, we needed vocals.

“I had lyrics and melodies in my head. A lot of the vocal parts were four-part harmonies. Crazy stuff. So I laid down vocals on the home demos using a vocoder and a guitar.

“I thought if I could get an unmixed album with vocoder vocals together, I could start sending it out to singers that I liked to see if they had any interest. I went back into Scott Thomas Reeder‘s studio to lay down the vocoder parts as a guide for singers. I did the track ‘Gang Justice’ first and Reeder turned around and said, ‘That’s how the vocals will stay. It’s inane.’ He asked, ‘Do you have stuff for every song using the vocoder?’ I did. So we went to work. The only song I didn’t have vocals for Reeder sang. It’s named ‘I’m Not Upside Down’.

“Overall, this record is heavy and dark. It’s inspired by DEVO, VOIVOD, KRAFTWORK, TORCHE, SLAYER and much as it’s inspired by ASWAD, JOE PASS and WES MONTGOMERY. The riffs are heavy and the vocoder vocals are full of harmonies.

“I wanted a super-heavy groove that would support angelic vocal harmonies. I think we achieved that.

Added Scott Thomas Reeder: “Yeah, Bob from FU MANCHU came into The Sanctuary do some recording with the other Scott Reeder — the drummer from FU MANCHU. I was stoked — been wanting to meet that guy for years! So they knocked out some crazy tracks all in a day — jaw- droppingly great stuff. I didn’t know if it was supposed to just be drums and guitar… so I asked later on, ‘Who’s playing bass on this stuff?’ They hadn’t decided yet, but Bob was gonna come back and put some bass tracks down later. I suggested that maybe I take a stab at it, and they were down! It’s really crazy stuff, the most challenging material I’ve done since I was in THE OBSESSED. I got through most of it — there were a few ‘guide tracks’ in there that I asked Bob to put down that were flawless — I ended up leaving those in. Spent just a few more days with Bob coming back to the ranch to add some textures with his arsenal of effects.

“I was kinda bummed when we wrapped on tracking! It was a blast working with these guys, and I’m glad the the other Reeder is a great guy and a monster drummer — can’t wait for the confusion that is sure to come from having both of us on this thing.”

Said Scott Reeder: About two years ago, Bob and I started trading riffs and beats back and forth via the wonders of modern technology. Sometimes he would be sending me three different things in one file and I would just throw up a 57 as an overhead and record my whole kit and send it back. Or I might have a beat and say, ‘Hey, play something to this.’ ‘Whites Of Your Eyes’ started that way. It was much faster and I was just warming up around the kit and got inspired to get it down. Then we got together and just slowed down the tempo and he added new parts.

“We agreed that most of the stuff needed not to be super picked apart and scrutinized. It was more of a ‘first-thought-best-thought’ approach. And whatever made us just laugh and go, ‘Yeah, that’s super weird. It’s gotta be that way!!’

“It all springs from Bob‘s riffs; he can play anything, but he plays it the way you want to hear it!! As always, that’s the most fun stuff to play to. I think that shows up in recording. It’s fun to listen to.

“We blasted through 10 songs of basics in four hours. We were just having a great time, so we just knocked it out!! And to have that great bass playing of Scott‘s in there, I could not imagine it sounding heavier but, of course, he just blew me away.”

Continued Balch: “In the end, we had J. Robbins (CLUTCH, THE SWORD, THE HIDDEN HAND) mix the record. I loved his work and I’m a big fan of the band he played bass in GOVERNMENT ISSUE. He mixed THE HIDDEN HAND‘s ‘Mother, Teacher, Destroyer’, which is one of my favorite-sounding records. I wanted to get a heavy sound like that, but I also wanted a DEVO ‘Duty Now For The Future’ or RUSH ‘Moving Pictures’ vibe. I think that those ingredients play off the vocoder really well.

“I’ve never even met J. Robbins. It’s funny, I don’t even know what he looks like. We spoke on the phone about the approach I wanted and then I sent the tunes to the East Coast to have him work on it. He did an insane job and was a total pleasure to work with.

“We picked Dan Coutant at Sun Room Audio to master the record. He has worked with CLUTCH and COLISEUM in the past. We saw eye to eye immediately.”

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FU MANCHU guitarist/vocalist Bob Balch and drummer Scott Reeder have joined forces with former KYUSS bassist Scott Thomas Reeder in SUN & SAIL CLUB. Their debut album, “Mannequin”, will be released in early November via Satin Records.

Said Balch: “In between FU MANCHU tours, I was writing all this material that was really frantic and dark. Lots of notes and strange chords.

“A lot of times I would go interview a guitar player for my site PlayThisRiff.com and come back inspired and full of ideas. Just to make Scott Reeder laugh I would send him a file to play drums on.

“Well, anybody who has seen FU MANCHU live knows Reeder is a monster behind the kit. So I would try to throw him some curveballs to trip him up. No such luck. Every riff I sent him he nailed. After a while, there was an album’s worth of stuff.

“I really wanted Scott Thomas Reeder to play bass on it. I love the work he has done in his recording studio too, so I figured that if we recorded stuff there, hopefully he’d dig it and play on it.

“I remember after the first take we walked into the control room and Reeder said, ‘I had an idea!’ He asked to play on it and I almost crapped myself. I don’t think I’ve ever said ‘Yes!’ faster.

“His bass lines are insane. Lots of drop-A stuff which is probably pretty hard on bass. He nailed it too!

“Once the bass tracks were in place, we needed vocals.

“I had lyrics and melodies in my head. A lot of the vocal parts were four-part harmonies. Crazy stuff. So I laid down vocals on the home demos using a vocoder and a guitar.

“I thought if I could get an unmixed album with vocoder vocals together, I could start sending it out to singers that I liked to see if they had any interest. I went back into Scott Thomas Reeder‘s studio to lay down the vocoder parts as a guide for singers. I did the track ‘Gang Justice’ first and Reeder turned around and said, ‘That’s how the vocals will stay. It’s inane.’ He asked, ‘Do you have stuff for every song using the vocoder?’ I did. So we went to work. The only song I didn’t have vocals for Reeder sang. It’s named ‘I’m Not Upside Down’.

“Overall, this record is heavy and dark. It’s inspired by DEVO, VOIVOD, KRAFTWORK, TORCHE, SLAYER and much as it’s inspired by ASWAD, JOE PASS and WES MONTGOMERY. The riffs are heavy and the vocoder vocals are full of harmonies.

“I wanted a super-heavy groove that would support angelic vocal harmonies. I think we achieved that.

Added Scott Thomas Reeder: “Yeah, Bob from FU MANCHU came into The Sanctuary do some recording with the other Scott Reeder — the drummer from FU MANCHU. I was stoked — been wanting to meet that guy for years! So they knocked out some crazy tracks all in a day — jaw- droppingly great stuff. I didn’t know if it was supposed to just be drums and guitar… so I asked later on, ‘Who’s playing bass on this stuff?’ They hadn’t decided yet, but Bob was gonna come back and put some bass tracks down later. I suggested that maybe I take a stab at it, and they were down! It’s really crazy stuff, the most challenging material I’ve done since I was in THE OBSESSED. I got through most of it — there were a few ‘guide tracks’ in there that I asked Bob to put down that were flawless — I ended up leaving those in. Spent just a few more days with Bob coming back to the ranch to add some textures with his arsenal of effects.

“I was kinda bummed when we wrapped on tracking! It was a blast working with these guys, and I’m glad the the other Reeder is a great guy and a monster drummer — can’t wait for the confusion that is sure to come from having both of us on this thing.”

Said Scott Reeder: About two years ago, Bob and I started trading riffs and beats back and forth via the wonders of modern technology. Sometimes he would be sending me three different things in one file and I would just throw up a 57 as an overhead and record my whole kit and send it back. Or I might have a beat and say, ‘Hey, play something to this.’ ‘Whites Of Your Eyes’ started that way. It was much faster and I was just warming up around the kit and got inspired to get it down. Then we got together and just slowed down the tempo and he added new parts.

“We agreed that most of the stuff needed not to be super picked apart and scrutinized. It was more of a ‘first-thought-best-thought’ approach. And whatever made us just laugh and go, ‘Yeah, that’s super weird. It’s gotta be that way!!’

“It all springs from Bob‘s riffs; he can play anything, but he plays it the way you want to hear it!! As always, that’s the most fun stuff to play to. I think that shows up in recording. It’s fun to listen to.

“We blasted through 10 songs of basics in four hours. We were just having a great time, so we just knocked it out!! And to have that great bass playing of Scott‘s in there, I could not imagine it sounding heavier but, of course, he just blew me away.”

Continued Balch: “In the end, we had J. Robbins (CLUTCH, THE SWORD, THE HIDDEN HAND) mix the record. I loved his work and I’m a big fan of the band he played bass in GOVERNMENT ISSUE. He mixed THE HIDDEN HAND‘s ‘Mother, Teacher, Destroyer’, which is one of my favorite-sounding records. I wanted to get a heavy sound like that, but I also wanted a DEVO ‘Duty Now For The Future’ or RUSH ‘Moving Pictures’ vibe. I think that those ingredients play off the vocoder really well.

“I’ve never even met J. Robbins. It’s funny, I don’t even know what he looks like. We spoke on the phone about the approach I wanted and then I sent the tunes to the East Coast to have him work on it. He did an insane job and was a total pleasure to work with.

“We picked Dan Coutant at Sun Room Audio to master the record. He has worked with CLUTCH and COLISEUM in the past. We saw eye to eye immediately.”

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Skwerl of Antiquiet recently conducted an interview with former KYUSS and current VISTA CHINO singer John Garcia and drummer Brant Bjork. A couple of excerpts from the chat follow below.

Antiquiet: First, do you think the media got the story straight [with the lawsuit between you and former KYUSS guitarist Josh Homme and bassist Scott Reeder over the rights to the KYUSS name]?

Brant Bjork: No. The media, you know, nine out of ten times, never gets the story straight. And I think part of [Josh Homme‘s] strategy from day one was to, you know, set things up so the media wouldn’t get things straight. That’s kind of been the cornerstone of Josh‘s whole trip for years. And this lawsuit was just a super extreme extension of that kind of manipulation and falsity. It’s a real drag and it really makes it stressful and painful and frustrating, because you know, he’s got a voice and he’s got a lot of money. When you’re dealing with someone who is aggressive and bitter and bullying you with that kind of power, it’s a difficult thing to manage.

Antiquiet: You think he manipulated the media as just a “scorched-earth” move to make his point, or what?

Brant Bjork: Well, I think he just wanted to smear us and, I mean, he falsely accused of things that we never did. In fact, the irony is that he publicly accused us of something that, technically, he did. If anyone infringed on a trademark, it would have been him. But once again, when you get pulled into a lawsuit, it’s not usually based on law or principle, it’s usually based on economics. He knew from day one that we don’t stand a chance economically. John and I fought as hard as we could, and we educated ourselves, and I studied the law every day, but in the end we just couldn’t afford to move forward, there was just nothing we could do.

John Garcia: The whole thing was unnecessary. We never tried to steal the name. I think it could have been settled with one phone call, by Josh calling me and going, “Hey, dude, change the name or I’m going to sue you.” As simple as that. But it was, you know, I think it was a huge embarrassment, for Scott and Josh, and as well as Brant and I. Brant and I don’t like parking tickets, let alone federal lawsuits slapped upon our… I mean, who does?

Antiquiet: I can relate.

John Garcia: To answer your question, sorry about going off on a different avenue there… I didn’t really read a lot [of media reports], but the truth of the matter is that it was truly unnecessary. It could have been settled. Brant and I fought, I think put up a pretty good fight, but in the United States, sometimes those with the most money — I think the majority of the time, those with the most money — win. And we decided that it was worth the initial fight, but in the end, it got to the point where we thought it would be much, much better to stop it. The lawyers, and the bills, it took a little bit too much of a toll on us, and we said, “Look, we’re going to change our name.”

Antiquiet: If Josh had just called you up, ahead of time, and said, “Look, change the name or I’m going to sue you,” are you saying you would have done that, you would have changed the name? Or did the fight have to happen, in some form?

John Garcia: Well, it could have been that simple. But because of his, you know… At first he loved the idea [of us playing KYUSS songs under the name KYUSS LIVES!]. I mean, everywhere [he] went, “Hey, what do you think about John and Brant doing this stuff?” “Oh, yeah, go get ’em, guys. Fuckin’ more power to you. Fuckin’ kick ass…” And then all of a sudden, he thought that we were trying to steal the name, to trademark the name. And that was not true. We were never going to be called KYUSS. It was always KYUSS LIVES! And we had three band members — four of them. Fuck, me, Brant, Nick and Scott Reeder are playing in the band. So, you know, we never meant to steal the name, we never wanted to steal the name… But I think, yes, to answer your question, I think if Josh would have called me up, or emailed me, and said, “Hey, change the name, or I’m going to sue you,” I would have said, “Okay.” Absolutely, 100%, yes.

Brant Bjork: No one wants conflict. John and I want to make music, you know? We all have our own individual beliefs, and John and I, and I think I speak for Nick [Oliveri, former KYUSS bassist] as well, John asked me in 2010 to get KYUSS back together. He didn’t ask me to start a new band. I wouldn’t have been interested in starting a new band. And that’s what we did. KYUSS was, you know, I feel obligated to say it these days, but you know, KYUSS was a band that I started, and it was a name that I found. I didn’t see any reason in having to change it. And if we would have been threatened, we might have looked at other options to avoid any kind of complications, just so we could focus on getting the music to the people, but it just never happened. He kind of waited until the whole thing had kind of ran its course. It was very strange, and I’m still a little shocked, to be honest — a lot shocked, to be honest.

Antiquiet: I sat down with Nick in a bar, like last year when he was quitting [KYUSS LIVES!], and we talked about a lot of different things, and at the time, he said he felt the lawsuit was going to end friendships and ensure you guys were never going to play with Josh or Scott again. Now that it’s behind you, how has the fallout been? Are the friendships fucked up?

Brant Bjork: Well, I mean, Josh and I haven’t been friends for many years. There’s been pockets of time where we’ve been amicable and we tried to deal with our differences and whatever. Over the years, I’ve reached out to try and just kind of smooth things out, and for whatever reason, he just has always continuously fallen into this like, disdain for me. I don’t know what it is. It’s no big deal to me, really. I don’t really care. I don’t need him as a friend, and Scott, I could say the same. I mean, there was a time I respected them as musicians. But after something like this, I don’t have any respect for them. I think they’re shallow people. I think they’ve got serious ego problems, and they’re just all-around negative. This lawsuit affected me and my family, man, you know? I can’t tolerate that on any level. Scott Reeder and Josh Homme are two people that I just don’t recognize; I don’t believe in them at all.

Read the entire interview at Antiquiet.

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Drummer Scott Rockenfield talks pressure band faced during “Queensryche” recording.

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Vinny Cecolini of Jam Magazine recently conducted an interview with QUEENSRŸCHE drummer Scott Rockenfield. A couple of excerpts from the chat follow below.

Jam Magazine: Do you at all regret that your disagreement with Geoff Tate spilled out onto the Internet and into the music media worldwide?

Scott: We have always only spoken the truth. We have never avoided any type of engagement on this matter and we’re not here to defend ourselves. I’d rather let the music, this band and our chemistry together do the talking for us. There are fans on the Internet, however, who insert themselves into the rhetoric. For what it’s worth, this would be an interesting reality show if you trolled the Internet to read about our transition. However, it would be time-consuming, and I’d rather write new songs and focus on what I’m good at.

Jam Magazine: When I spoke with Geoff Tate earlier last spring, he said the legal battle involving the band’s names is about the dissolution of a corporation.

Scott: [Silent pause] My answer to all of that is simple. If the case goes all the way ’til the actual [January 2014] court date, the judge is going to look at the facts and he or she will make a ruling. Hopefully, his or her decision will be based upon what is best for the band QUEENSRŸCHE, the brand QUEENSRŸCHE and the corporation QUEENSRŸCHE. It is an entity, and a successful one at that. I hope that come [January], the judge overseeing this case will do what is right for the band as far as who carries on with the name. I’m not a legal guy, so I do not know all of the details. But I have learned a lot from my attorney.

Jam Magazine: You don’t seem stressed about the upcoming ruling?

Scott: If I worried about everything that was going on right now, it would eat me alive. Whatever happens, Todd [La Torre, vocals], Parker [Lundgren, guitar], Michael [Wilton, guitar], Eddie [Jackson, bass] and I going on as a group regardless of the [January] ruling. We will continue on as a unit of five guys that makes records and plays shows. We have something that no one can take away from us — chemistry and friendship. No one can take that away from us.

Jam Magazine: How long did it take La Torre to become comfortable performing as QUEENSRŸCHE‘s singer?

Scott: When we played our first song together during the first RISING WEST show, the four of us knew instantly we were going to be able to do something together. The band felt comfortable on stage and off. We knew that traveling together was not going to be a problem. During the last year, we have gone on multiple tours using a bus. It felt like we were meant to be together. Being on the road was so much fun; we were always looking forward to our next tour rather than dreading it. That had been a case for a while. Now we just count down the days until new shows are booked and we’re back on the road performing another show.

Read the entire interview at Jam Magazine.

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Hold your excitement, metal fans, here’s the ultimate Rock ‘N’ Roll Fantasy Camp specifically for you metalheads. Rock ‘N’ Roll Fantasy Camp is proud to present JUDAS PRIEST bandmembers — including singer Rob Halford, bassist Ian Hill, drummer Scott Travis, and guitarist Richie Faulkner. (Please note: Glenn Tipton is still in the band but is unable to attend the camp.) More metal masters include Zakk Wylde (OZZY OSBOURNE, BLACK LABEL SOCIETY) and Geoff Tate (QUEENSRŸCHE). This camp will be hosted in Las Vegas at the Rock ‘N’ Roll Fantasy Camp complex and MGM Grand Hotel & Casino from Thursday, February 27 through Sunday, March 2, 2014.

Over the course of four metal-filled days, campers will be placed into bands led by rock star counselors, including Rudy Sarzo (QUEENSRŸCHE, QUIOT RIOT), Vinny Appice (DIO, BLACK SABBATH), Phil Soussan (OZZY OSBOURNE), and Lita Ford (THE RUNAWAYS). Musicians will hone their stage presence, learn to play some of metal music’s greatest songs, get tips on playing as a band and hear stories of life on the road from their rock star counselors. Campers will also attend master classes with these renowned musicians prior to performing live with their band in front of an audience at MGM Grand Hotel & Casino in Las Vegas!

For more information, visit RockCamp.com.

judaspriestcamp

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Full Throttle Rock recently conducted an interview with QUEENSRŸCHE drummer Scott Rockenfield.

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Mark Uricheck of The Musician’s Voice blog recently conducted an interview with QUEENSRŸCHE drummer Scott Rockenfield.

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