Posts Tagged “Eighties”

Not to be confused with John Zorn‘s in-and-out jazz and folk tribe nor the short-lived thrash crew from the late eighties, this death metal unit from Philadelphia was founded in 2008 by guitarist Chris Milewski. Contained amongst his ranks is former IMMOLATION, RELLIK and GOREAPHOBIA skin crusher, Craig Smilowski, who fields drums on two tracks of MASADA‘s “Hideous Rot” EP. Also brought on board for the same deuce on the EP is RELLIK bassist Matt Dwyer.

While still obviously in a developing phase, MASADA employs a few moments of ingenuity outside of their choppy and clunky delivery. Cazz “The Black Lourde of Crucifixion” Grant handles the band’s ralphs and even drums on two tracks, “Hideous Cerebral Pulp” and “Exist to Rot”. Interestingly, those songs bear a better sound capture than the murky production on the SmilowkiDwyer-aided “Suffer Mental Decay” and “Toxic Unreality”.

Sure, the expanded personnel on the latter two tracks opens up MASADA‘s songwriting, in particular the grinding final bars of “Suffer Mental Decay” and then with Dwyer‘s reverberating bass chops taking the forefront of “Toxic Unreality”. However, it’s a shame these tracks are smothered by Dwyer‘s lines and Cazz Grant‘s putrid growls. Also looped with an encompassing narrative soundbyte on “Toxic Unreality”, you have to work a bit to hone in on Smilowski and Milewski.

“Hideous Cerebral Pulp”, handled exclusively by Milewski and Grant, is, oddly enough, the best track of the EP. Despite the limited performing numbers here, the mix is crisper and tighter. We can hear Chris Milewski homogenously layering his guitars and vibrating bass licks with Cazz Grant‘s drumming evenly sewn in. Grant‘s growls may be tempered somewhat in the mix of this cut, but it’s almost staggering how more professional “Hideous Cerebral Pulp” rings than “Suffer Mental Decay” and “Toxic Unreality”.

In-between “Hideous Rot”‘s five tracks is a superb (if downright bizarre) flute and reed percussion interjection, “Fluxeotherapy”, delivered by BLACK WIDOW UK‘s Clive Jones. Spiked by a disturbed lace of sex moans and shivers, “Fluxeotherapy” comes off like JETHRO TULL for S&M fetishists. Afterwards, “Exist to Rot” rumbles forward with a pretty sharp slowdown sequence in which Chris Milewski weaves a VOIVOD-inspired guitar nocturne.

“Hideous Rot” could have been better had the Dwyer and Smilowski tracks been given the same care in transfer. Otherwise, there’s some pretty cool stuff to chew on here with minimal investment time. MASADA may or may not become a write-off side project, but it’s to their benefit to utilize a uniform production value if there’s any objective of continuance.

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EYEHATEGOD frontman Mike Williams has released the following statement:

Joseph M. LaCaze, New Orleans native and drummer for EYEHATEGOD, MYSTICK KREWE OF CLEARLIGHT and OUTLAW ORDER, passed away on August 23rd in New Orleans after a very successful five-week U.K. and European tour with EYEHATEGOD. He also performed ceremonial voodoo drumming and in numerous solo experimental electronic projects. Doctors confirmed to family members the cause as respiratory failure. He also suffered from severe long-term asthma.

“An account is set up for the benefit of his daughter Lilith LaCaze. Checks can be made payable to the Lilith LaCaze or Joseph LaCaze donation fund at any Capital One bank in any city.”

It was recently announced that EYEHATEGOD would make an appearance at Philip Anselmo‘s first annual Housecore Horror Film Festival this fall in Austin, Texas.

Since forming in 1988, EYEHATEGOD has defied all odds and continues to exist and persist despite personal and professional setbacks. They’ve been called doomcore, sludge and stoner rock, survived line-up shuffles, label hassles and a short-lived split. And after more than two decades of creating some of the most corrosive, vile music known to man, EYEHATEGOD still hasn’t lost the piss and vinegar that fueled it back the late Eighties.

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According to numerous reports out of New Orleans, Joey LaCaze, drummer of EYEHATEGOD, OUTLAW ORDER and TEN SUICIDES, has passed away. No further details are currently available.

EYEHATEGOD just completed a month-long tour of Europe and was gearing up for a string of dates in celebration of its 25th anniversary.

It was recently announced that EYEHATEGOD would make an appearance at Philip Anselmo‘s first annual Housecore Horror Film Festival this fall in Austin, Texas.

Since forming in 1988, EYEHATEGOD has defied all odds and continues to exist and persist despite personal and professional setbacks. They’ve been called doomcore, sludge and stoner rock, survived line-up shuffles, label hassles and a short-lived split. And after more than two decades of creating some of the most corrosive, vile music known to man, EYEHATEGOD still hasn’t lost the piss and vinegar that fueled it back the late Eighties.

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They’re so bloody awful you can only appreciate them if you’re a horror fan, especially if you’d lived through the succession of Friday the 13th films that appeared faithfully each year during the eighties.  To watch them on the tube is brainless fun, but really, the Friday films’ purest viewing element was, naturally, the movie theaters. 

Not quite the stuff of cult legend like the notorious midnight Rocky Horror screenings that were booked for ad infinitum, you had to have been there for a Friday the 13th film back in the day to really get it.  The kids who attended the 2009 Friday remake got it and I recall laughing under my breath how much they ass-clowned, shouted at the screen, blared sexual innuendo and cheered on all the sex and the gore…exactly as my generation had throughout the eighties.

I was too young to get in to the first three Friday the 13th films, and I was still too young to see Friday the 13th, The Final Chapter.  Yet I come from an era where frivolent lawsuits were seldom filed and we lived in a less-hyper society, so much that I was able to pass my 14-year-old self and all of my neighborhood buddies into the theater when the laughably titled Final Chapter came out in 1984. 

Our parents knew where we were and since I was the unspoken leader of our development tribe, the parents automatically trusted me.  One of my friend’s dads hauled the whole lot of us to the theater and on the way took us down a creepy dirt road just to mess with us since he knew we were off to the horror show.  I love Mr. Steve for that, he was a righteous dad.

I’ll never forget stepping up to the box office and getting my own ticket for the first time to a rated R flick and then answering the lady in the booth that yes, all those other kids who apparently looked their ages in her eyes were all with me. It was a moment of triumph probably best savored if you’re a young boy already anticipating the gore, the cussing and best of all, the T&A scattered (or splattered, if you like) throughout Friday the 13th, The Final Chapter.  I felt like I’d pulled of the scam of a lifetime.

While hardly the stuff of Oscar worthiness, I tend to favor The Final Chapter over most of the other films, as do most Friday freaks.  Even though the original Friday has future star Kevin Bacon in it, this one came to play with Corey Feldman, who was well on his way to fame as a child star of the eighties, plus Crispin Glover.  If soap operas are your thing, Peter Barton (who’d also been in Hell Night previously) would go on to enjoy notoriety on The Young and the Restless.  I’m not saying the script and the acting of The Final Chapter is stellar stuff, but it does take the time to build our sympathies for Felman’s family of Jarvises before the clothes fly off at the adjacent party pad and Jason Voorhees comes to crash the festivities.

Really, the biggest star of The Final Chapter–and he doesn’t appear in single frame–is Tom Savini.  While his special effects and makeup work in the first Friday is brilliant, consider The Final Chapter one of his masterpieces.   Today I’m more fascinated by the monster masks Savini created for Corey Feldman’s bedroom of bedlam, but the kill scenes in The Final Chapter are one of the reasons for the film’s enduring popularity.  For me, I still appreciate the film’s setting and attention to detail.  Just the opening segment of all the chaos involved in cleaning up the aftermath of Friday the 13th Part III then sudden silence of the farm as everyone hauls out is a rather nifty bit of storytelling that didn’t appear in these films too often.

You can imagine my underage self, my undererage friends and a sold-out theater screaming with revulsion and then applauding like mutants during the scene where Jason saws and twists the head of Bruce Mahler.  We groaned like we were half sick when we finally see Jason’s full hockey mask by the time he smashes through the partition in the shower and crushes Peter Barton’s face to a pulp.  What I remember most was everyone in the theater going out of their minds during Crispin Glover’s one-two punch kill with the corkscrew and meat cleaver.  He’d played his character to such a dorky lilt no one could believe he’d scored with Camilla More, thus his brutal dispatching was actually celebrated by the crowd with shrieks and hysterical laughing.  Ditto for watching Corey Feldman shave his head to look like Jason then whacking the butcher upside the face with that machete.  The way Jason slides down that blade through his eye is something people still revel in today.

I remember being quite a showoff at the theater, making “boingy boingy” noises during the skinny dip scenes and cracking the audience up.  Everyone got into the act from there and the entire experience became as much a riot from the audience participation the only thing that was missing was the flying toilet paper and spinning popcorn buckets.

Really, you had to have been there.

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Found some old relics from my stamping days in the eighties.  Can’t believe I can actually strap ’em on.

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Asking Alexandria: The UK’s bright young hopes?

Asking Alexandria guitarist Ben Bruce reckons the globe-conquering metalcore crew’s new album is mixing up some pretty interesting influences.

“There’s a lot of heavy riffage on this record, whereas in the past we relied more on rhythms and breakdowns,” he muses. “So in that respect it’s very much like old Slipknot,” he tells Guitar World. “But then the choruses and a lot of the bridges are more rock-based, which is our Mötley Crüe side.”

Slipknot vs Mötley Crüe. Interesting…

“The album is by no means a regurgitation of the Eighties,” he adds. “If kids buy this record thinking it’s going to sound like Girls Girls Girls, it doesn’t fucking sound like Girls Girls Girls. It sounds like Asking Alexandria.”

The new AA opus was recorded with producer Joey Sturgis at Foundation Recording Studios in Indiana and will be released in the first half of 2013 via Sumerian. The band play four huge, sold-out homecoming shows on these shores this and next month with While She Sleeps, Motionless In White and Betraying The Martyrs. Be proud, UK. We have a young metal band that are selling out Academy venues in 2013. Not bad at all.

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In high school, I was, of course, a grit, a headbanger, a longhair, a hockey head, whatever you want to call it, so long as you don’t affix the word “mullet,” since that term was never a part of eighties lexicon.  After a year-and-a-half in fierce defense of the music I loved against our mocking school body, I found myself in an interesting position.  I was hardly Marc Price’s “Ragman” from Trick Or Treat, the beaten and bruised outcast nobody wanted around.  The secret I discovered to working the high school social scene despite having little in common with my peers, was taking weightlifting from sophomore to senior years and getting to know the jocks.  The more reps I pumped and the higher my weight class went, I was accepted despite my heaving boy-shag.  Then I was able to converse with girls about anything and everything.  That strategm didn’t win me many dates until I found a serious girlfriend in junior year, but I’d become a soundboard for many of the ladies in our school and in time, I had double the amount of friends outside my own kind, as it were.

If there was one sect of kids I found it hard to penetrate, it was the punk rockers.  I loved punk and was always curious about the skaters and mohawks parading around the school in their leather, bristles and acne (to call upon GBH for a moment), not to mention their records, almost all of which were carrying Black Flag.  I dug the speed and the intensity of eighties hardcore and I tripped on the brackish muck of Iggy and the Stooges.  Before you knew it, I was adding records by Adrenalin OD, DRI, Agent Orange, Discharge, Broken Bones, The Exploited, the Ramones and of course, GBH to my metalhead library.

There seemed something secretive about Black Flag amongst our punk sanction.  Maybe it was because the farmer bruisers at school targeted them more than anyone else, albeit the mousier metalheads weren’t far off their radar.  I remember one legendary day when one of the punks smarted off to the FFA clique and then a high speed chase ensued out of the school parking lot with the farmers beaming down on the punks via the then-backwoods throughway of our town, Hampstead well into the neighboring burg, Manchester.  Suffice it to say from those who followed the action, the punkers didn’t fare well thereafter.

It was shortly thereafter I made a point to get to know these punk kids.  They hated me because I was metal, albeit when push comes to shove, they had their own latent affinities for Black Sabbath and even the early years of Iron Maiden, since Paul DiAnno was a punk in his own right.  It took me some prodding and nudging into their ranks and mostly I was met with “fuck off” or “go to hell.”  Soon enough, though, they’d found out me and my headbanger friends were listening to the same music they were.  Elusive as they’d been in the past, suddenly we were allied.  I knew that because of crossover, we were all bound to join ranks, which is why I pushed as hard as I did to align our causes.

Finally, the ice melted and I found Black Flag in my hands as we stepped over the subdivision lines and traded records.  I had Loose Nut, Damaged, Slip It In and My War on loan and I taped all of them onto cassette. It was then when I realized just why those punkers were so protective of these records.  For them to swap these slabs of destruction with others outside of their own bracket really became a profound thing.  I laughed myself silly over “T.V. Party” and the perverse sex moans of “Slip It In.”  For the longest time, I muttered the chorus of “Black Coffee” under my breath in the school hallways, even to my then-girlfriend who thought I was insane–even more so when I’d actually played the song for her.  A fond memory indeed, right up there with the time she was changing clothes in my car while I had Anvil’s “Mad Dog” pounding in her poor anti-metal ears.  Yet by the time I put on My War in private, I was no longer laughing. 

If you can find an angrier song on this planet than “My War,” I’m not sure I want to hear it.  “My War” is by far the most dangerous song I’ve ever encountered, and yet, it’s strangely empowering.  If you’re in control of your emotions, “My War” is full-on adrenaline to draw unimaginable power from.  If you’re in a dark place, though, “My War” is likely to set you off or, on the opposite end of the spectrum, heal you.  By no means would anyone want to be the bullseye of Henry Rollins’ wrath circa 1984, complete with all of the spit and the howling he tosses into “My War.”  His voice in Black Flag was always the sound of writhing angst, unchained fury, a rabid, tatted harbinger of borderline nihilism.  Yet the man possesses high-end intelligence that makes you listen up, scary as the prospect may be when confronting My War in its entirety, much less the scathing title track.

If you’re familiar with My War, you’ll attest it’s a yin and yan audile experience with the first half of songs set on an ionized, heavy-stepping pace of aggression, while the second part is slower, tempered, in harmony with punk and doom favorites, Saint Vitus and of course, Sabbath before either of them.  We can all relate to the claustrophobic, hyper agitation of “Can’t Decide” and “Beat My Head Against the Wall,” while “Three Nights” and  “Scream” are meticulous, scraping modes of punk drone that, frankly, have the potential to scare the shit out of even the most stoic listener upon first greeting.

Greg Ginn is a fuzz-bombed superstar on “My War.”  Even going so far as to handle the bass duties under the alias of Dale Nixon while Black Flag was in a contractual skirmish during the recording of this album, Ginn’s work on My War is probably the most laborious, pinpointed and harrowing of his Black Flag era.  Rollins frequently screeches like his nads are being electrocuted by Ginn’s reverb, particularly on “Scream.”  You understand full well why the punk rock class of ’84 held this album tight upon their hypothetical chests.

Damaged is acknowledged by many as Black Flag’s finest hour, yet, I pose that if you have the stones to confront My War, you’ll get a better grasp of what Black Flag stood for and moreover, what they meant to their audience.  Otherwise, you’re just one of them.

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Giant X is the new project by Running Wild founder Rock ‘n’ Rolf Kasparek and guitarist Peter J. Jordan. The debut release “I” will contain 3 new tracks and will be issued through SPV Records on January 18, 2013 (Germany), January 21, 2013 (Europe) and January 22, 2012 (North America).

Jordan commented: ““Giant X have a broader musical range which allows Rolf and myself to present ourselves from a totally different side. Our material consists of consciously multi-layered numbers, more in the tradition of Kiss, Queen, Thin Lizzy, Van Halen but also Billy Talent, in other words: rock music in the tradition of the seventies, eighties and nineties – our shared musical roots. The main thing for us was that people would be able hear the lightness and spontaneity of our collaboration.”

Check out the first teaser here:

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Roxx Records is excited to announce that Italian thrash band Boarders has just signed on to the label’s roster for the release of sophomore effort “R-Existence.” Roxx comments:

“While the band had briefly offered this new release as a free digital only download to their fanbase, it is now being remastered to include 5 additional bonus tracks, 3 brand new songs and 2 previously unreleased demos, and put on to CD for the very first time.

“A band that can trace its history back to the late eighties, Boarders presents a unique melding of the aggressive thrash and melodic metal that draws extensively from the musical trends of that era. And nowhere is that more evident than on the material from the groups debut ‘The World Hates Me’ which was released in 2009.

“R-Existence marks a return to form of that melding of thrash and metal with songs certain to garner the attention of those into Megadeth, Metallica, and old school Deliverance. As a matter of fact, Boarders once gained notoriety in Italy as a Megadeth tribute band; hence, the inclusion of the old Megadeth song ‘In My Darkest Hour’ (off So Far, So Good, So What) on their debut release.”

Bill Bafford of Roxx Records also had this to say about the signing: “We are very excited to be working with Boarders on this release, we have been becoming more and more focused on the thrash scene as the label expands and Boarders is an excellent addition to our roster.”

Watch for the limited edition CD version of “R-Existence” and reissued digital editions to hit the streets on December 11th, 2012.

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Roxx Records is excited to announce that Italian thrash band Boarders has just signed on to the label’s roster for the release of sophomore effort “R-Existence.” Roxx comments:

“While the band had briefly offered this new release as a free digital only download to their fanbase, it is now being remastered to include 5 additional bonus tracks, 3 brand new songs and 2 previously unreleased demos, and put on to CD for the very first time.

“A band that can trace its history back to the late eighties, Boarders presents a unique melding of the aggressive thrash and melodic metal that draws extensively from the musical trends of that era. And nowhere is that more evident than on the material from the groups debut ‘The World Hates Me’ which was released in 2009.

“R-Existence marks a return to form of that melding of thrash and metal with songs certain to garner the attention of those into Megadeth, Metallica, and old school Deliverance. As a matter of fact, Boarders once gained notoriety in Italy as a Megadeth tribute band; hence, the inclusion of the old Megadeth song ‘In My Darkest Hour’ (off So Far, So Good, So What) on their debut release.”

Bill Bafford of Roxx Records also had this to say about the signing: “We are very excited to be working with Boarders on this release, we have been becoming more and more focused on the thrash scene as the label expands and Boarders is an excellent addition to our roster.”

Watch for the limited edition CD version of “R-Existence” and reissued digital editions to hit the streets on December 11th, 2012.

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