Posts Tagged “Essence”

Karl Lean of Australia’s Heavy magazine recently conducted an interview with THE CULT singer Ian Astbury. A couple of excerpts from the chat follow below.

On the band’s heavy touring schedule:

Astbury: “It’s what we do. Since we started we’ve been live musicans, it’s always been live first. Recording, record deals, career and everything else came afterwards. It was really just about playing in bars to start with.”

“The band’s been rolling pretty consistently the past 7 or 8 years, and we just don’t want to stop. We’ve got momentum, we’ve got the album out and it’s going strong.

‘Choice Of Weapon’ did really really well. Previous to that, we did the Capsule collection, and previous to that, we did the ‘Love’ tour, which was great. That was kind of inspired by seeing Bowie do the ‘Low’ album, probably one of the first artists to go out and play an album, an iconic record in its entirety. So for us, we’re between albums right now, but we want to keep playing.”

On performing the “Electric” album in its entirety:

Astbury: “A lot these songs we’ve never played live.

“We don’t really think of this material as ‘old’; the action of playing live makes it all become fresh. It’s always like kind of an external perception of what we do; there’s memories and connections to a piece or body of work. So for us, ‘Electric 13’ is those ‘Electric’ songs brought alive again. We’re probably better musicans now than we were then; we’re at the top of our game right now. The shows have been amazing. The band’s on fire. It’s the most consistent lineup we’ve had. We’ve been playing together for 7 or 8 years, so it’s really tight.”

On offering plenty more than just a nostalgia trip for older fans:

Astbury: “We don’t identify ourselves as classic rock. To me, that term is like an old custodian. But this band is vital, it’s virile, aggressive, guttural. It can be sublime, it can be violent, it can be poetic. Within that is the essence of THE CULT. We have 9 studio albums and a history of working different genres — from hard rock to modern alternative post rock; very eclectic. We are still here.”

On the ups and downs of touring life:

Astbury: “Touring has always been a grind. It’s a tough lifestyle. It’s not like every day you get to be in Sydney, or Tokyo, or New York, or Paris.

“Touring is basically going from venue to venue. We just drove 10 hours from our last gig to here in Biloxi, Mississippi. Tomorrow we’ll do a 14-hour drive to the next show.

“The drives are really long, especially here in the States. And it’s the down times that you get into trouble. You try and keep your head together and not get into trouble.

“I much prefer driving to flying, though; all that sitting in airports. You don’t get offstage until after midnight, and you’ll have a flight at 9 in the morning. By the time you get cleaned up, you never sleep; you’re constantly tired, living on caffeine. That’s what it is.

“You chose the lifestyle and I’m not going to cry about that; it’s just the reality of touring. But once you do get on stage, it’s like catharsis, a release — that’s the time you really get to express yourself and it’s gratifying having an audience that has stayed with the band for so long.”

Read more from Heavy magazine.

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Karl Lean of Australia’s Heavy magazine recently conducted an interview with THE CULT singer Ian Astbury. A couple of excerpts from the chat follow below.

On the band’s heavy touring schedule:

Astbury: “It’s what we do. Since we started we’ve been live musicans, it’s always been live first. Recording, record deals, career and everything else came afterwards. It was really just about playing in bars to start with.”

“The band’s been rolling pretty consistently the past 7 or 8 years, and we just don’t want to stop. We’ve got momentum, we’ve got the album out and it’s going strong.

‘Choice Of Weapon’ did really really well. Previous to that, we did the Capsule collection, and previous to that, we did the ‘Love’ tour, which was great. That was kind of inspired by seeing Bowie do the ‘Low’ album, probably one of the first artists to go out and play an album, an iconic record in its entirety. So for us, we’re between albums right now, but we want to keep playing.”

On performing the “Electric” album in its entirety:

Astbury: “A lot these songs we’ve never played live.

“We don’t really think of this material as ‘old’; the action of playing live makes it all become fresh. It’s always like kind of an external perception of what we do; there’s memories and connections to a piece or body of work. So for us, ‘Electric 13’ is those ‘Electric’ songs brought alive again. We’re probably better musicans now than we were then; we’re at the top of our game right now. The shows have been amazing. The band’s on fire. It’s the most consistent lineup we’ve had. We’ve been playing together for 7 or 8 years, so it’s really tight.”

On offering plenty more than just a nostalgia trip for older fans:

Astbury: “We don’t identify ourselves as classic rock. To me, that term is like an old custodian. But this band is vital, it’s virile, aggressive, gutteral. It can be sublime, it can be violent, it can be poetic. Within that is the essence of THE CULT. We have 9 studio albums and a history of working different genres — from hard rock to modern alternative post rock; very eclectic. We are still here.”

On the ups and downs of touring life:

Astbury: “Touring has always been a grind. It’s a tough lifestyle. It’s not like every day you get to be in Sydney, or Tokyo, or New York, or Paris.

“Touring is basically going from venue to venue. We just drove 10 hours from our last gig to here in Biloxi, Mississippi. Tomorrow we’ll do a 14-hour drive to the next show.

“The drives are really long, especially here in the States. And it’s the down times that you get into trouble. You try and keep your head together and not get into trouble.

“I much prefer driving to flying, though; all that sitting in airports. You don’t get offstage until after midnight, and you’ll have a flight at 9 in the morning. By the time you get cleaned up, you never sleep; you’re constantly tired, living on caffeine. That’s what it is.

“You chose the lifestyle and I’m not going to cry about that; it’s just the reality of touring. But once you do get on stage, it’s like catharsis, a release — that’s the time you really get to express yourself and it’s gratifying having an audience that has stayed with the band for so long.”

Read more from Heavy magazine.

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Megadeth frontman talks essence of guitar solos, claims Chris Broderick is the best guitarist he’s ever played with.

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Israel’s melodic black metal outfit Magor has released the band’s first official music video for the track “Essence To The Oblivion.” Check it out below. “Essence To The Oblivion” is taken from the debut album “Drawn To The Dark,” which was recorded, mixed, and mastered by Miko Haronian At Metal Sound Studios

The post Magor Releases First Music Video For “Essence To The Oblivion” appeared first on Daily Heavy Metal News.

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Mercenary is out on the road with Essence and Omnium Gatherum. The band has now posted the following message online about Essence dropping off the tour: “It is with great regret that we must inform you that Essence has left our European tour early. Due to health issues the band chose to cancel the rest of the tour.

The post Essence Drops Off European Tour With Mercenary appeared first on Daily Heavy Metal News.

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David E. Gehlke of DeadRhetoric.com recently conducted an interview with WATAIN mainman Erik Danielsson. A few excerpts from the chat follow below.

DeadRhetoric.com: It seems like everything you’ve done of late has been on a bigger scale. I think a lot of us can remember you coming up with “Casus Luciferi” and “Sworn To The Dark”, but leading up to “The Wild Hunt”, things are of greater scale.

Erik Danielsson: It’s the way it goes, I guess. We’ve been doing this for 15 years and people have come to understand that we’re a force to be reckoned with and you have to let the fans do that, and business people, too. To be honest, things have changed very literally in the world in WATAIN. To us, it’s very much the same thing, the same purpose in our lives. From where we stand, nothing has really changed, but at the same time, we have more and more people working, we have tour agencies and management and whatever that are taken care of this and this. So I suppose it’s a reflection of how people relate to the band. It’s rather something that matters more for other people than us.

DeadRhetoric.com: What’s your take on people who think bands have to stay within certain parameters to be black metal?

Danielsson: I very much agree with them. To the extent of that to me, it’s not a matter of staying true to a musical spine; that spine is one rather of atmosphere and ideology rather than a musical one. And that’s what defines WATAIN. Black metal music is music that, in essence, is diabolical and has diabolical energies and that is where the definition lies to me. Incorporating elements like keyboards… it only takes away from the diabolical aspect of it, because we’re talking about the wild, the untamed, ferocious, predatory aspect of it, the tribe within this music. You cannot really get into that permutation with those things if you have a sound that opposes those things.

DeadRhetoric.com: In North America, we have a lot of what is called “Cascadian” or post-black metal bands who don’t look the part whatsoever. Have you caught wind of them?

Danielsson: I haven’t caught their wind — I stay out of that wind as much as I can. [laughs] I’m in my own world with WATAIN. What I can say with black metal is that it’s as much about ideology and spiritually and if those things are real, they’ll reflect in everything else. Especially aesthetics and the way people appear. For me, the concept of performing black metal in jogging pants and jogging shoes and a CANNIBAL CORPSE t-shirt is impossible; it’s not meant to be that way. To me, it’s an art form that demands everything. If you want to be in a black metal band, you take yourself as an adversary of society, because that’s what black metal is. That has to go beyond just playing songs. That has to reflect on every aspect of your life if you really want to place your focus on this movement. So yeah, that’s my advice. [laughs]

Read the entire interview at DeadRhetoric.com.

“The Wild Hunt” full-album stream:



watainwildhuntdigi


watainwildhuntvinyl

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David E. Gehlke of DeadRhetoric.com recently conducted an interview with WATAIN mainman Erik Danielsson. A few excerpts from the chat follow below.

DeadRhetoric.com: It seems like everything you’ve done of late has been on a bigger scale. I think a lot of us can remember you coming up with “Casus Luciferi” and “Sworn To The Dark”, but leading up to “The Wild Hunt”, things are of greater scale.

Erik Danielsson: It’s the way it goes, I guess. We’ve been doing this for 15 years and people have come to understand that we’re a force to be reckoned with and you have to let the fans do that, and business people, too. To be honest, things have changed very literally in the world in WATAIN. To us, it’s very much the same thing, the same purpose in our lives. From where we stand, nothing has really changed, but at the same time, we have more and more people working, we have tour agencies and management and whatever that are taken care of this and this. So I suppose it’s a reflection of how people relate to the band. It’s rather something that matters more for other people than us.

DeadRhetoric.com: What’s your take on people who think bands have to stay within certain parameters to be black metal?

Danielsson: I very much agree with them. To the extent of that to me, it’s not a matter of staying true to a musical spine; that spine is one rather of atmosphere and ideology rather than a musical one. And that’s what defines WATAIN. Black metal music is music that, in essence, is diabolical and has diabolical energies and that is where the definition lies to me. Incorporating elements like keyboards… it only takes away from the diabolical aspect of it, because we’re talking about the wild, the untamed, ferocious, predatory aspect of it, the tribe within this music. You cannot really get into that permutation with those things if you have a sound that opposes those things.

DeadRhetoric.com: In North America, we have a lot of what is called “Cascadian” or post-black metal bands who don’t look the part whatsoever. Have you caught wind of them?

Danielsson: I haven’t caught their wind — I stay out of that wind as much as I can. [laughs] I’m in my own world with WATAIN. What I can say with black metal is that it’s as much about ideology and spiritually and if those things are real, they’ll reflect in everything else. Especially aesthetics and the way people appear. For me, the concept of performing black metal in jogging pants and jogging shoes and a CANNIBAL CORPSE t-shirt is impossible; it’s not meant to be that way. To me, it’s an art form that demands everything. If you want to be in a black metal band, you take yourself as an adversary of society, because that’s what black metal is. That has to go beyond just playing songs. That has to reflect on every aspect of your life if you really want to place your focus on this movement. So yeah, that’s my advice. [laughs]

Read the entire interview at DeadRhetoric.com.

“The Wild Hunt” full-album stream:



watainwildhuntdigi


watainwildhuntvinyl

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“Gemstones”, the new video from Danish thrashers ESSENCE, can be seen below.

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Danish thrash act Essence posted a album preview clip for the band’s new album “Last Night of Solace.” The album is set for release March 29, 2013 via NoiseArt Records.

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Danish thrashers ESSENCE will release their new album, “Last Night Of Solace”, on March 29 via NoiseArt Records.

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