Posts Tagged “Hansen”

“Fear Me”, a brand new song from Danish thrashers HATESPHERE, can be streamed in the YouTube clip below. The track comes off the band’s eighth studio album, “Murderlust”, which will be released on September 27 via Massacre Records. The CD was recorded at Antfarm Studios in Aarhus, Denmark with producer Tue Madsen (THE HAUNTED, SICK OF IT ALL, MOONSPELL, DARK TRANQUILLITY) and it once again features cover artwork by MNEMIC‘s Mircea Gabriel Eftemie.

“Murderlust” will be made available as both standard and digipack.

The track listing is as follows:

01. Murderlust
02. Pandora’s Hell
03. Fear Me
04. The Violent Act
05. Punishable By Death
06. In Process
07. Iconoclast
08. Darkest Of Forces
09. Refill The Chest
10. Assassin (MUSE cover)

Digipack bonus tracks:

11. Murderlust (pre-production)
12. 500 Dead People (live)

HATESPHERE will support HYPOCRISY on the second leg of the “End Of Disclosure Tour 2013” this fall.

HATESPHERE‘s most recent album, “The Great Bludgeoning”, entered the official chart in Denmark at position No. 40. The group’s 2009 effort, “To The Nines”, landed at No. 36 while 2007’s “Serpent Smiles and Killer Eyes” debuted at No. 26.

Vocalist Esben “Esse” Hansen joined HATESPHERE as the band’s new singer in June 2010.

hatespheremurderlustcd_600

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Niclas Müller-Hansen of Sweden’s Metalshrine recently conducted an interview with guitarist John Petrucci of progressive metal giants DREAM THEATER. A couple of excerpts from the chat follow below.

Metalshrine: A self-titled album? Was that something that you thought of right away or did it come as you were working on it?

John: Actually, we decided it or brought it up before we ever got into the studio. I had kinda written this proposal up for everybody, outlining what I thought were some of the things that would be cool to try to tackle. Certain engineers and mixers we could use and what kind of album, sound and direction and within that part of it, was the idea, at least to discuss, that it might be a good idea to self-title this one. It wasn’t set in stone and if there was something that was just obviously way more fitting to what we were doing, then we were being open-minded. Keeping that in mind, as we started to talk about the kind of album we wanted to make, we had Mike Mangini [drums] there in the room with us and we’re writing these songs that were coming out really powerful and very signature of DREAM THEATER, it started making a lot of sense. Then when we had presented it to Roadrunner and our management, and only after hearing four songs, they were all aboard and thought it was the greatest idea. Included in the initial proposal, and again with the possibility that it might change, was the idea of just the way the album cover came out. It would just be the symbol, a very understated confidence and basically not titling it, not having our mind on the cover and only using the symbol, was a bold, strong statement. Kinda like they do in the movies when a new “Superman” is coming out. You see an S and you don’t have to say anything else.

Metalshrine: Just using the band name for the album, was that also something to do with it being the first real album with Mangini? Like a fresh start?

John: In a way. It’s funny because we’ve been together for 28 years and one of the things that always bugs me with bands that have been around and have a history, you hear fans going, “Those guys, are they still around?” or they go see them playing live and the band is trying to play a new song and it’s, like, “Don’t play the new song! Play the old stuff!” I don’t want that to ever happen to us. I want us to always reinvent and always having another opportunity to catch people’s attention. Sometimes the way it works out is that the first time they heard our band might be this album and they won’t even know the back catalog.

Metalshrine: How do you push yourselves and challenge yourselves after all this time?

John: It’s kinda part of the fun, to be honest. We take a lot of pride in what we do and when you take a lot of pride in it and you hopefully put that into what you do so there’s quality to it. People kinda get used to the fact that you’re not just gonna be lazy or complacent or not try hard. It’s like when BMW are coming out with cars. If you look at the history of cars, they get better and better. The materials get better and they learn new technology and it’s like they’re proud of each one, it’s a heritage. They’re not gonna come out with a shitty car that doesn’t work. [laughs] The challenge, as you bring it up, to be creative, is the fun of it. It’s like, “What can we do better?” It’s kinda cool.

Metalshrine: Is every member in the band replaceable?

John: No, I wouldn’t say that. In fact, you don’t even wanna think about it. It’s a weird thing to think of. It’s like one of those competitive slogans: “Everyone’s replaceable.” I guess it’s true in concept, but I think it gets to the point where if a certain combination or a certain person isn’t in a certain band, the sound is gone. It depends on each band and who it might be. You don’t wanna get too cocky about it, right, because “everyone’s replaceable.” [laughs]

Metalshrine: Could you see [former DREAM THEATER drummer] Mike Portnoy‘s band THE WINERY DOGS opening up for DREAM THEATER if he asked you?

John: Yeah. I mean… I said this a long time ago. When you play with somebody for that long, I don’t see that you would never see that person again. I can picture us playing a festival or something and we have history involved with all of our ex members. Sounds like a club! [laughs] I think the best thing to do is keep that type of thing friendly. It’s just the way to be in life, you know, but the next tour we’re doing is just ‘An evening with DREAM THEATER,” so there are no opening bands.

Read the entire interview at Metalshrine.

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“Murderlust”, the title track of the eighth studio album from Danish thrashers HATESPHERE, can be streamed in the YouTube clip below. Due on September 27 via Massacre Records, the CD was recorded at Antfarm Studios in Aarhus, Denmark with producer Tue Madsen (THE HAUNTED, SICK OF IT ALL, MOONSPELL, DARK TRANQUILLITY) and it once again features cover artwork by MNEMIC‘s Mircea Gabriel Eftemie.

“Murderlust” will be made available as both standard and digipack.

The track listing is as follows:

01. Murderlust
02. Pandora’s Hell
03. Fear Me
04. The Violent Act
05. Punishable By Death
06. In Process
07. Iconoclast
08. Darkest Of Forces
09. Refill The Chest
10. Assassin (MUSE cover)

Digipack bonus tracks:

11. Murderlust (pre-production)
12. 500 Dead People (live)

HATESPHERE will support HYPOCRISY on the second leg of the “End Of Disclosure Tour 2013” this fall.

HATESPHERE‘s most recent album, “The Great Bludgeoning”, entered the official chart in Denmark at position No. 40. The group’s 2009 effort, “To The Nines”, landed at No. 36 while 2007’s “Serpent Smiles and Killer Eyes” debuted at No. 26.

Vocalist Esben “Esse” Hansen joined HATESPHERE as the band’s new singer in June 2010.

hatespheremurderlustcd_600

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Niclas Müller-Hansen of Sweden’s Metalshrine recently conducted an interview with vocalist Sigurd “Satyr” Wongraven of Norwegian black metallers SATYRICON. A couple of excerpts from the chat follow below.

Metalshrine: The [new, self-titled] album [from SATYRICON] was recorded using analog equipment. A lot of bands seem to be doing this now. What’s your thoughts about it? I get the feeling that it’s kinda coming back.

Satyr: Well, I’m actually under the impression that it’s not coming back. I might be wrong, but my impression is that music throughout the last three or four years is disgustingly processed. I have talked to people that have worked with some of the true superstars. There’s this Norwegian production bureau called Stargate and they do a lot of stuff for Rihanna and so on and they are obviously very good at what they do, but I’ve talked to them as a musician and about sound and some of the things that I intensely hate about modern-day music productions and they explained to me that it’s what the artists want, management wants, record company wants, radio wants. They don’t want it to sound real, they want it to sound super processed and as a producer, that’s what you cater to, of course. I guess that’s the shocking part of it. I drove around once in a car with one of the instrument endorsers of SATYRICON and he played me some record from a very famous metal band, that was heavily processed. Everything sounded very powerful and ultra-tight, but to me, it was lifeless and dead. He was very enthusiastic and he was blasting it in the car. It was impressive, but I still hated it. I just said, “OK, fine,” but I thought to myself, “How can you not hear that this sounds so fake, so manufactured?” I was hoping that this SATYRICON record, working they way that we worked, not only would it communicate the emotions within the songs, the atmosphere, but also perhaps somehow contribute to what I’m hoping will become more of a trend, because that would be one of those good trends. For bands to do things more organic. That’s not something new to SATYRICON, but the difference is that it’s been so much hardcore and uncompromising on this record, compared to previous records, and that’s perhaps because we felt these songs needed it more than what we’ve done previously. But it was also because I’ve never felt so strongly about these things as I do now. When I had discussions about the record with A&R legend Monte Conner, and he’s a music nerd like me, and I said to him, “I think a lot of the sounds you’ve been hearing from metal bands in the last few years are gonna be tomorrow’s embarrassments, just like when people look at photos of themselves from the ’80s.” I think a lot of people a few years down the road, when they listen to their records from like 2012, are gonna go. “What were we thinking?” Then Monte said “I think you’re right. I actually think a few years down the road, a lot of the records that are popular today, are gonna be remastered to make them sound more analog,” which is the complete fuckup of some of the classic analog records that are being remastered in a way to make them sound more digital and sterile. I think the purist approach on the record helped create the record that it is. We thought that if we were gonna get this to come across the right way, and to have these songs provide that kinda authentic language, like we feel when we play them, we had to make the record, to a large degree, like it feels that you’re in the room with SATYRICON when you hear the record. That’s what we tried to do and I think we succeded. There’s a reason why it’s self-titled, because we really feel it defines the mentality and the musical philosophy of the band in terms of song writing and it shows what SATYRICON is about and it also points at the future. A part of what defines SATYRICON is a progressive attitude.

Metalshrine: You worked on it in a very isolated place for a long time. What do you draw inspiration from? Do you read a lot?

Satyr: I never stay in such a way that I stay there all the time. What I did was that I talked to an engineer friend of mine, where I know that he was using this old cabin lodge on his private property and it’s actually dated from 1550, because you can see it in the wood and from the building techniques. He had almost like an antique garage in there where he would set up his music and being in there is so cool. I said, “I love the atmosphere in here and to have something like this and do the SATYRICON record in,” and he said, “You can do that!” I was, like, “No, we can’t do a record in here.” But he just answered, “I think you could.” I started going through the process of myself, since having done this for so long and being used to be working in some of the best studios in the world, and then all of a sudden try to move into something that was actually made to either store food in or to keep goats or pigs in. We actually did most of the album in there. We were in the studio for about six months and five months were in there and we did six to eight months of pre-production and rehearsals in there as well, to get used to the place and feed off of the vibein the song writing and get acquainted and just feel at home. I’m very glad that I did that and I think a part of how I convinced myself into taking that chance, was based on experiences like the “Now, Diabolical” record, which I’m very pleased with, but there are things on the record that I would’ve wanted differently and I think part of why certain things didn’t come out they way I wanted them to was that I wasn’t where I needed to be mentally because I hated the place where I was working so much. In hindsight, I realized that it affected me more negatively than I understood at the time.

Metalshrine: So hadn’t you stayed in this cabin, it might have been a different-sounding album?

Satyr: Yes, definitely. Even the fact that everything was so primitive. There’s not much to do outside of recording, and I guess that it is actually quite nice to be at a place where there’s a sense of comfort and a possibility to have a little bit of variation during the day, but again, if you have something which is very rustic and primitive, it becomes very intense. You never have breaks, you just go, go, go, because there’s nothing else to do. That creates a bubble, and you find yourself living in a world within the world. To disconnect from reality when working with music is something I have great experiences with and I think that’s why a lot of people, whether they’re in music or journalism or whatever, find it constructive to do work during the night. I don’t think it’s the fact that it’s dark outside or some dark force connecting with your inner self, I just think it’s because the phone doesn’t ring, there aren’t as many new e-mails, there’s no spouse telling you to do things. It’s more quiet and you enjoy being in that state of mind where you undistracted can move on with your stuff and stay in that mind frame.

Read the entire interview at Metalshrine.

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UNISONIC, the band featuring former HELLOWEEN vocalist Michael Kiske and Hansen alongside guitarist Mandy Meyer (ASIA, GOTTHARD and KROKUS), bassist Dennis Ward and drummer Kosta Zafiriou (both of Germany’s PINK CREAM 69), has “started collecting and exchanging ideas” for its second full-length album, to be released in 2014.

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Niclas Müller-Hansen of Sweden’s Metalshrine recently conducted an interview with vocalist Ivan Moody of Las Vegas metallers FIVE FINGER DEATH PUNCH.

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Niclas Müller-Hansen of Sweden’s Metalshrine recently conducted an interview with THIN LIZZY and BLACK STAR RIDERS frontman Ricky Warwick.

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Danish melodic death metallers MERCENARY recently entered Hansen Studios in Ribe, Denmark to begin recording their seventh album for a late 2013 release via NoiseArt Records in Europe and Prosthetic Records in North America.

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Niclas Müller-Hansen of Sweden’s Metalshrine recently conducted an interview with former SKID ROW singer Sebastian Bach.

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Niclas Müller-Hansen of Sweden’s Metalshrine recently conducted an interview with frontwoman Lzzy Hale and guitarist Joe Hottinger of Pennsylvanian rockers HALESTORM.

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