Posts Tagged “Hard Time”

Bryan Reesman of Attention Deficit Delirium recently conducted an interview with guitarist John Petrucci of progressive metallers DREAM THEATER. A couple of excerpts from the chat follow below.

Attention Deficit Delirium: Your wife, Rena Sands, plays guitar in the JUDAS PRIESTESS tribute band. Is there ever a chance that you two might do a musical project together?

Petrucci: We would love to. We talk about doing that. It just depends on what the style would be and just finding the time to do that. She’s such a great guitar player. We’re celebrating our 20th wedding anniversary. We just got from back from Vegas actually.

Attention Deficit Delirium: Congratulations.

Petrucci: Thank you. When we first met, music is the thing that we really connected with and has always been a big part of our lives. We now have three kids, all teenagers who play music, and this is something that we’re all really connected to. That would be unbelievable to do something together.

Attention Deficit Delirium: Artists often have a hard time handling relationships because of our crazy schedules. How have you two managed to make things work for 20 years?

Petrucci: It takes a lot of understanding. I think [due to] the fact that my wife is a musician and is in the same career, she completely knows what’s involved and is the type of person who is just unbelievably supportive. When you think about how much time I have to be away because of touring…as you said it’s an unconventional kind industry situation, and I’m in the studio for 10 to 12 hours a day. Meanwhile we had three kids, twins first, so she spent all that time raising them. I’m 100,000,000% convinced that I wouldn’t be where I am today in my life and my career without her and that level of understanding, support and strength. It’s unbelievable. It really is. The fact that she’s able to give me feedback and that we can talk about things creatively and share ideas as I’m writing is just amazing. It’s really, really cool.

Attention Deficit Delirium: I’m enjoying the new DREAM THEATER album a lot. When the band started, it was a mixture of progressive complexity along with melodic elements that made it radio friendly. The mid-period of DREAM THEATER got more into epic songs and complexity, but it seems like the last couple of releases have gotten back to mixing these off-kilter time signatures and crazy riffs with catchy choruses. I wrote that in my recent studio report, and there were some fans who were turned off that idea, but I think it’s a good thing. Was this a conscious return to that style of songwriting, or did it just come about naturally?

Petrucci: It’s definitely something that we wanted to focus on a lot. As far as the style of the band and the way that we come across, it’s important to us that that always stays intact. We’re a progressive band with a metal sound, and the musical style is very powerful. We try to push the boundaries, but having said that, the most important thing is the songwriting. At the end of the day, it’s the compositions, it’s whether or not your music reaches people. It’s communication. It’s always been an important element of our music — the melodic side that you said, the catchy chorus side but also the overall melodic content — how the vocals hit you, how the song message hits you — I think that separates the men from the boys in a lot of aspects as far as writing in a progressive style. The songs need to be catchy, they need to be relatable, they need to be strong, and we did focus more on that this time, there’s no doubt about it. We did go in saying we’re going to make a strong and bold album. It’s going to be everything that we love to do, but we’re going to take extra special attention on the compositional songwriting elements so that within that structure the songs are even that much more powerful emotionally.

Read the entire interview at Attention Deficit Delirium.

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U.K.’s Metal Hammer magazine recently got the chance to chat to SLIPKNOT and SCAR THE MARTYR drummer Joey Jordison and asked him for his thoughts on some of metal’s big-hitters that have been grabbing headlines this year. Here’s what he had to say.

On AVENGED SEVENFOLD:

Jordison: “Honestly, I don’t own any AVENGED SEVENFOLD records and I’ve not heard the new record. I’ve read about comparisons to METALLICA on the new record, and I guess there’s a certain controversy around that, but I’ve not paid that much attention to it. Nothing against them, I’m not knocking them, but I was just never a fan: not that they’re bad, they’re just one of those bands that kinda bypassed me.”

On METALLICA:

Jordison: “That’s the fucking band. Without METALLICA, I wouldn’t be doing what I am doing. I have every METALLICA record, of course, and I would spend hours on drums in my parents’ basement, with the stereo behind me, cranking those records and learning Lars‘ [Ulrich] drum beats, beat by beat. And nowadays, for me, METALLICA can do whatever the fuck they want. I’m not sure that ‘Lulu’ is something I’d be getting into, but METALLICA have a free pass from me to do anything, I can’t really knock anything they do. I mean [LED] ZEPPELIN and THE WHO passed the torch to METALLICA; they’re that band for our generation. Everything they do now is going to be met with a little bit of a backlash just because they’re so big, but without METALLICA, there would be no heavy bands, hardly. People have a hard time saying that, and obviously there’s a ton of other great bands, but there’s a reason that they’re huge and have been able to expand their audience to millions and millions and millions of people. I have nothing but praise for them.”

On BLACK SABBATH:

Jordison: “Proper SABBATH is SABBATH with Bill Ward. I’m sorry, it just is. Bill Ward is one of the most underrated drummers ever — the dude is fucking unreal, such a great, great player. And I just can’t bring myself to see SABBATH without Bill Ward, because he was such an integral part of that band. He’s like John Bonham or Keith Moon, one of those drummers who made the drum parts of those classic songs just as special as the guitar riffs or the vocals. I respect those guys doing what they’re doing, but sorry, count me out.”

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Our Joey in Murderdolls mode

We got the chance to chat to Slipknot legend and Scar The Martyr mainman Joey Jordison recently, so we thought we’d ask him for his thoughts on some of metal’s big-hitters that have been grabbing headlines this year. Here’s what he had to say…

On Avenged Sevenfold…

“Honestly I don’t own any Avenged Sevenfold records and I’ve not heard the new record. I’ve read about comparisons to Metallica on the new record, and I guess there’s a certain controversy around that, but I’ve not paid that much attention to it. Nothing against them, I’m not knocking them, but I was just never a fan: not that they’re bad, they’re just one of those bands that kinda bypassed me.”

Scar The Martyr

Joey (far right) with new band Scar The Martyr, who release their debut on Monday

On Metallica…

“That’s the fucking band. Without Metallica I wouldn’t be doing what I am doing. I have every Metallica record of course, and I would spend hours on drums in my parents’ basement, with the stereo behind me, cranking those records and learning Lars’ drum beats, beat by beat. And nowadays, for me, Metallica can do whatever the fuck they want. I’m not sure that Lulu is something I’d be getting into, but Metallica have a free pass from me to do anything, I can’t really knock anything they do. I mean Zeppelin and The Who passed the torch to Metallica, they’re that band for our generation. Everything they do now is going to be met with a little bit of a backlash just because they’re so big, but without Metallica there would be no heavy bands, hardly. People have a hard time saying that, and obviously there’s a ton of other great bands, but there’s a reason that they’re huge and have been able to expand their audience to millions and millions and millions of people. I have nothing but praise for them.”

On Black Sabbath…

“Proper Sabbath is Sabbath with Bill Ward. I’m sorry, it just is. Bill Ward is one of the most underrated drummers ever, the dude is fucking unreal, such a great, great player. And I just can’t bring myself to see Sabbath without Bill Ward because he was such an integral part of that band. He’s like John Bonham or Keith Moon, one of those drummers who made the drum parts of those classic songs just as special as the guitar riffs or the vocals. I respect those guys doing what they’re doing, but sorry, count me out.”

Big words indeed. 

Scar The Martyr‘s debut album lands this Monday (September 30) via Roadrunner. Scar The Martyr play the following dates this winter with Alice In Chains and Ghost:

 

11/09 London, UK – London Alexandra Palace
11/10 Leeds, UK – Leeds O2 Academy
11/11 Manchester, UK – Manchester Academy
11/13 Birmingham, UK – Birmingham O2 Academy
11/14 Glasgow, UK – Glasgow O2 Academy
11/15 Newport, UK – Newport Centre

Tickets are on sale now from www.kililive.comwww.seetickets.com and 0844 871 8803.

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GUNS N’ ROSES guitarist Ron “Bumblefoot” Thal was interviewed on the latest episode of “Totally Driven Radio”, the weekly radio podcast heard live every Thursday night from 8 p.m. to 11:00 p.m. EST on the VOC Nation Radio Network. You can now listen to the podcast using the audio player below.

Asked about GUNS N’ ROSES‘ continual stage tardiness, with long waits for singer Axl Rose just as much a definite at a the band’s concerts a couple of years ago as hearing “Paradise City” or “Welcome To The Jungle”, Thal said: “That hasn’t happened for a long time. But it did for a long time. And that’s not something that I can ignore and pretend hasn’t happened or didn’t happen.

“I absolutely had the hardest time out of anybody in the band with that stuff — with ‘late’ stuff.

“I’m always in touch with one very simple thing: you make music to make people happy. You put on a show, you entertain — whatever you wanna call it — you do it to make people happy. And to be happy, and to just share this great moment together. And anything that takes away from that or undoes that or creates the opposite of that is completely just anti why you’re doing what you’re doing. So if there are 20,000 people that are pissed off, ’cause we just left them…

“I mean, hell, if I have to wait five minutes longer in a doctor’s office, or in traffic or something like that, I’m starting to get annoyed. So imagine, if that’s five minutes, imagine two hours. Yeah, I get it; I totally get it. It’s not like I don’t care, it’s just… there’s nothing I can do.

“But that was something I had a very hard time with, and there’s been times when I just walked off stage and just started throwing a fit on the side. I had a really hard time with that, and I understand, and I know. And it’s not just that, it’s not just the waiting, it’s the fact that.. if you’re gonna do that to someone that isn’t expecting that and has a babysitter waiting, or you have to be up in four hours for work, or whatever it is, or the buses are gonna stop running soon, or whatever it is.

“It’s, like, you didn’t go out that night and buy those tickets and do us the honor of having your presence there just to stain our existence so that we could completely fuck you and inconvenience you and put you in this position wher, alright, ‘My life is gonna be really annoying, and I have to choose between missing the show after waiting for it, or seeing it.’

“I’ve gotten so much resentment over that from people. And they have the right. And I’m just happy that that’s not happening anymore. And I’m really, really happy that we’ve been going on time, close to on time, sometimes early. And I know the fans are very happy; the people that come to the show are much happier about that.

“There’s always the fans that are, like, ‘Nah, it’s a rock concert. They should be three hours late.’ Maybe for you, but not for the other 20,000 people… Everyone’s got responsibilities. Rent isn’t what it was in the ’70s. There’s a lot more living hand to mouth, and you can’t fuck with that. And I get it. And this is not some kind of, like… I’m not trying to bash Axl or anything. I get it. And I’m just glad that we’ve been doing better with that.”

In an August 2010 radio interview, former SKID ROW singer Sebastian Bach, a close personal friend of Axl Rose, offered an explanation for why the GUNS N’ ROSES frontman is persistently late going on stage. “Everybody has all these theories as to why he acts the way he acts, and there’s no big mystery,” Bach said. “He tells me the source of all of the insanity — it’s his voice. It’s his job to sing like that, and sometimes that sound is hard for him. And a lot of singers, you know… To sing in that range is just not an easy thing to do. And he does what he can, and it takes him 45 more minutes to warm up his pipes so he can sing ‘Sweet Child O’Mine’.”

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In the brand new issue of U.K.’s Metal Hammer magazine, the members of KORN discuss the return of guitarist Brian “Head” Welch to the band seven years after he quit the group to become a born-again Christian.

Asked about the harsh words that were spoken on both sides when Welch left, KORN singer Jonathan Davis said: “Well, he was just cuckoo with religious stuff. I’ve seen people go through it, and he was kicking speed so obviously he’s not gonna be right in the head for a while. Him getting all crazy Christian and stuff, what it really did was save his life, so I don’t give a fuck. I’ve had too many people around me die from drugs and I wouldn’t want that to happen. Him and Reggie [KORN bassist Reginald ‘Fieldy’ Arvizu] are born-again Christians, that’s fine. I don’t choose sides, I’ve got Christian friends and Satanist friends.”

According to Davis, no one needed persuading that Head should be back in the band. “I think everyone was on board with it,” the singer said. “Me and [guitarist] Munky were thinking, ‘Is he gonna take off again? Is he fucking crazy?’ But he just came back and he was normal Head. He left a long time ago and this is a different band now, so he’s getting used to different things. He had to go and do his thing and we went off in another direction creatively. Another thing was Head wanted to come and check things out to see if we were all partying still. He wanted to make sure he wouldn’t fall off the wagon because everyone was partying, but we all stopped a long time ago. What I’d give just to be able to do that again, drink and do drugs, and wake up feeling fine, but you get those three-, four-day hangovers. I had them at 28, that’s why I had to stop.”

Welch spoke about whether he had any reserations about rejoining KORN, telling Metal Hammer, “I heard Jonathan was having a hard time, and that made me have second thoughts if he’s not all there. But I talked to him, and since I’ve been back he’s come a long way. He was on all this medication and he was in a dark place. Ever since this year he’s come out of it. I ended up at a KORN concert and I felt the connection with the crowd and with my friends in KORN; it was just really emotional. Then Munky asked me back in and I felt it was time.”

He added: “It was the first time I’d seen him or spoken to him in eight years. Everyone would call Munky their best friend, he’s just that type of guy, but when he started drinking he turned into the opposite of what he was. When I was with him at that concert he looked like the guy I used to hang out with.”

Asked what it means to KORN having Head back in the band, Munky said: “It’s a lot of different things and they’re all positive, starting with having a chilghood friend back in our family. I wanted to make sure we stayed friends and have him back in my life. It was something that everybody wanted me to ask and it was only right that it should come from me. I think time heals most of that, between when he left the band and those words were said. We’ve all gone through those stupid-ass moments where we just regret a lot of things that we’ve done or said. It’s sort of like, ‘It’s OK, it’s all good.’ It’s about forgiveness and compassion.”

kornmetalhammercover2013

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Joe Wickstrom, founder of Nether Regions and bassist of Atriarch, has hit some hard time when it comes to his health. Come on in and help a dude out! There's really no way better I can describe Wickstrom's situation than his YouCaring.com fundraiser site, which I strongly encourage you to check out and donate to after …

The post Help Out Portland Metal Musician JOE WICKSTROM! appeared first on Metal Injection.

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Our Rob

So Rob Trujillo isn’t afraid to admit that a lot of Metallica fans weren’t exactly enamored with that whole Lulu thing…

“Obviously there were mixed reviews on our Lou Reed experience,” he tells the Detroit Free Press. “Some people thought it was an amazing artistic statement. A lot of Metallica fans thought it was crap. [laughs]

“You take chances and kind of go with the flow of it. We just try to have a good time. That’s the name of the game — be creative — and sometimes it works, sometimes it doesn’t work.

“That’s what makes the band special — the fact that Metallica can go in and play with an orchestra and collaborate with the likes of a Lou Reed, and actually do a bit of improvising in uncharted territory.

Metallicaaaaaah

“In this day and age, it’s important in staying relevant, especially for us. We’re inspired by so much, we like to try things. Sometimes financially it can be a task. We’re there to deliver the passion we feel for music. When we put on the guitars it’s like we’re kids again. And that’s different from a lot of bands when they get older, to still connect with music that way. We come up with so many riffs — our problem is trying to keep them all out of one song. [laughs] It’s a good problem to have.

“Right now we’re having a hard time focusing on making a new record because there’s so much else going on.”

Such as that new Metallica 3D movie out in September, for instance….

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Our Rob

So Rob Trujillo isn’t afraid to admit that a lot of Metallica fans weren’t exactly enamored with that whole Lulu thing…

“Obviously there were mixed reviews on our Lou Reed experience,” he tells the Detroit Free Press. “Some people thought it was an amazing artistic statement. A lot of Metallica fans thought it was crap. [laughs]

“You take chances and kind of go with the flow of it. We just try to have a good time. That’s the name of the game — be creative — and sometimes it works, sometimes it doesn’t work.

“That’s what makes the band special — the fact that Metallica can go in and play with an orchestra and collaborate with the likes of a Lou Reed, and actually do a bit of improvising in uncharted territory.

Metallicaaaaaah

“In this day and age, it’s important in staying relevant, especially for us. We’re inspired by so much, we like to try things. Sometimes financially it can be a task. We’re there to deliver the passion we feel for music. When we put on the guitars it’s like we’re kids again. And that’s different from a lot of bands when they get older, to still connect with music that way. We come up with so many riffs — our problem is trying to keep them all out of one song. [laughs] It’s a good problem to have.

“Right now we’re having a hard time focusing on making a new record because there’s so much else going on.”

Such as that new Metallica 3D movie out in September, for instance….

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Wisconsin State Journal has posted an obituary for former WHITE ZOMBIE and LAST CRACK drummer Phil Buerstatte, who died on May 19 at the age of 46.

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Ghost, featuring some Nameless Ghouls.

We spoke to one of the Nameless Ghouls from Ghost about why they worked with Dave Grohl, why their frontman Papa Emeritus II doesn’t exist, what happened to his predecessor Papa Emeritus, Darth Vader, and the possibility of a Ghost musical. Yes, really.

Why did you choose to work with Dave Grohl? He can’t have been the first guy who wanted to work with you.

“We were bringing him into the band, not the opposite way around. Most of the time people suggest [a collaboration] they want Papa in their context, which won’t work. I’m not saying for the rest of our career we will never ever do that, but in most other bands and contexts, Papa does not work. Sometimes people have a hard time understanding that Papa does not really exist. He exists in the same way Darth Vader exists, or Don Corleone.”

In that case, what other contexts might Papa work in?

“The only sort of non-Ghost context that we have been toying around with is going into a musical. Where we can adapt the story. Let’s say, just for example, that we would do Dracula. Take that whole story, we come up with the music and play, and Papa could obviously be Dracula. He would be the character as Dracula, but you know it’s Papa. He can come in many forms. That would be the narrative of the show. Papa could easily be the Phantom [of the Opera]. He’s basically that sort of character. To understand what Papa is, you have to look at Phantom Of The Opera, Dracula and Don Corleone.”

Papa Emeritus has been replaced for your second album with Papa Emerius II. Will there be a new Papa for every record?

“Yes.”

What are the old Papas going to do?

“The old Papas are retiring. He’s so decrepit anyway, so he’s not going anywhere. We’re just keeping him in the ministry. Then we’re going to put him up on display.”

What have you made of the rise of the occult rock scene?

“We aren’t really doing a lot to participate in the scene, because we have our agenda. Our agenda was to become a big theatrical rock act; it wasn’t to bring back doom to the people. But we were positioned there. I read somewhere that some people take offence because they hold the doom scene so dearly, and they see the new bands, and they talk about us coming in and destroying that. We’re just trying to do our thing.”

Interview by Tom Dare

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