Posts Tagged “Infinitum”

Swedish death metal act Sorcery will be touring the U.S. for the very first time, in support “Arrival at Six” released both on CD & 12″ LP back in January through Xtreem Music. The tour features a total of 15 shows across the U.S

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INFINITUM OBSCURE entered Audio Zombie Recordings in Tijuana, México on January 5 2013 to record a new single entitled “The Luminous Black” with producer Diego Soria.

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Mare Infinitum is a new project formed by two members of the Russian doom metal scene, A.K. iEzor (Comatose Vigil, Abstract Spirit) and Homer (ex-Who Dies In Siberian Slush). The album they have put out, “Sea of Infinity,” is nearly an hour of funeral doom/death which you may stream here or access in the widget below. The album consists of five compositions including one instrumental, and features guests doing clean singing to accompany the growls of A.K. iEzor.

Sea Of Infinity by Mare Infinitum

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Former Incantation bassist Joey “Fingers” Lombard died on January 3, 2012. He was 42 years old. Lombard played with Incantation from 2001-2005 and played on the following releases: “Blasphemy” (2002), “Decimate Christendom” (2004) and “Primordial Domination” (2006).

Former live Incantation bassist Roberto Lizárraga, who immediately stepped in when Lombard departed in 2005, posted the following statement, which the band re-posted on its Facebook Page:

“In 2003, while INCANTATION toured for the “Blasphemy” album, they played in San Diego and in Tijuana. INFINITUM OBSCURE played in the Tijuana gig. In this tour, I met this genuinely GREAT guy by the name of Joey Lombard, who was Incan’s bassist at the time (2001-2006).

“In 2005 I was asked to step into INCANTATION as live session bassist, since Joey would not be able to commit for all the touring for the “Decimate Christendom” album, then “Primordial Domination”.

“We also toured together in January 2005, I played bass for THE CHASM and he was still in INCANTATION. We shared a tour together.

“Joey even let me use his gear on 2 of those tours, we’ve had drinks together, dinner at John’s house, hung out in Johnstown, PA. Joey let me have a lot of the tabs he wrote for Incan bass lines so that I could learn them and practice them. We shared the same spot in the same band, but in different spectrum: Him in the recording and me in the Live section. I’ve done 10 tours/festival appearances, with Incantation between 2005 and 2009.

“With a deep DEEP sadness and gloom, I learned last night form my dear friend Jill McEntee that our dear brother and loved friend, Joey, had decided to leave this world on his own…

“Everyone in the INCANTATION family is deeply saddened by this. Joey was a GREAT GREAT guy, mellow, really sincere, calm, honest, and with a really BIG heart and an excellent musician.

“My dear brother, you are now in peace, the one you longed for. You will be deeply missed, thank you for everything dear friend…

Till we meet again…”

Lombard is not the only former bassist of the band to pass away. Bassist Aragon Amori, who played with the band from 1989-1990 passed away in 1996.

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OMISION’s In the Shadow of the Cross iscrushing death metal from Tijuana, Mexico that features past and present members of Sadistic Intent and Infinitum Obscure.  It is recommended for fans of…

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OMISION’s In the Shadow of the Cross iscrushing death metal from Tijuana, Mexico that features past and present members of Sadistic Intent and Infinitum Obscure.  It is recommended for fans of…

Read the rest of this article at www.Braingell.com and tune in to Braingell Radio!

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As Judas Priest will be hitting the road this year for their reported final tour, it’s appropriate to wander back to their 1977 masterwork, Sin After Sin.

Sin After Sin was, at one time, an acquired taste in Priest’s catalog. While it remains one of their all-time heaviest and most polished recordings, most fans picked up with the band either via British Steel and Hell Bent For Leather or Screaming for Vengeance and Defenders of the Faith. Those albums are slicker, louder and filled with iconic heavy metal classics. Sin After Sin is iconic itself, but you really had to dig backwards when learning the history of metal in order to appreciate their grinding “Dissident Aggressor” (made popular by benefit of Slayer’s cover) and the banging “Sinner,” “Race With the Devil” and “Starbreaker.”

A bit more refined than the over-the-top bludgeoning and tunefulness of their later work, Sin After Sin is a portal into a heavy metal wonderland, in sound by “Last Rose of Summer” and visually by the album’s escapist artwork. I have a great fondness for a lot of the older, detailed paintings gracing Judas Priest’s albums, in particular for Sad Wings of Destiny, Rocka Rolla and the Hero Hero compilation. I’m most fond, however, of the minimalist copier paper trail to infinitum found on Point of Entry. As a writer, that triggers my neurons and sends them scampering in search of that elusive vanishing point.

Yet the Sin After Sin album cover may provoke the most imagination of any of Priest’s albums. I think of Heavy Metal the magazine, I think of Arthur’s fadeout in Excalibur and I think of lust and desire, depicted in the abstract forms found at the sepulchure’s portal on this cover. One must deal with temptation from both sides when approaching the tomb, which really strikes my fancy.

Seduction and damnation await all who enter, and yet the Sin After Sin cover makes you want to see more, particularly to see if there’s a payout to the suggested sex by the translucent girl parting her legs to the side. What’s she hiding between her thighs? Kind of reminds you of an installment of Den from the pages of Heavy Metal, yes? With the devil obscura towards panel left, you get the feeling there’s pain coming with the pleasure, woe be to your genitalia…

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Doro – Fear No Evil Ultimate Collector’s Edition
2010 AFM Records
Ray Van Horn, Jr.

Doro, we love you.

The love gets amped infinitum with this boxed re-release of Doro Pesch’s 2009 Fear No Evil album, her best-selling work in two decades. Despite the tinny production that robbed some of the album’s integrity, the masses have spoken its approval and with that, AFM and Doro Pesch bring you the Fear No Evil Ultimate Collector’s Edition.

Mandatory for diehards, this attractive box set of Fear No Evil offers an expanded version of the album with alternate artwork and two added tracks, “All We Are 2007” and “On My Own.” That’s only getting warmed up. Also included are two maxi-singles for “Celebrate” and “Herzblut,” plus a sticker and a dual-sided small poster. For all of you harboring crushes upon the Queen of Metal (as this writer once did), the close-up spread of Doro Pesch is an instant reminder why it’s easy to get smitten by the lady–and on a personal note, having interviewed Doro many times now, her gentle speaking voice alone could melt even the harshest winters.

Fear No Evil, despite hollow output betrayals on a few songs, has been so welcomed by the metal public because Doro and her merry men consisting of Johnny Dee, Nick Douglas, Joe Taylor, Oliver Palotai and Luca Princiotta at least put in a sincere effort. The songs themsleves are amongst the heaviest tunes Doro’s signed her name to. For more elaboration of the album itself, feel free to kick up the original review of Fear No Evil in this site’s review archives, but suffice it to say, songs like “Night of the Warlock,” “Caught in a Battle,” “Running From the Devil” and the powerful “Herzblut” are as stout as they come in metal. Lift the stein and hail “Prost!” or “Zum Wohl!”

Each of the maxi-singles contain recurring versions of the songs including multi-lingual takes on “Herzblut” (which also need to be listened to for the arrangement variations, particularly the French version, “A Fond le Coeur”) and modified takes of “Celebrate.” The latter song is interesting to revisit with the vocal mixes of Saxon’s Biff Byford only and then the femme posse version featuring the bevvy of metal starlets and wolverines such as Sabina Classen, Angela Gossow, Liv Kristine Espanaes-Krull, the Girlschool posse, Veronica Freeman, Ji-In Cho, Floor Janssen and Liv from Sister Sin. The gang choruses of “Celebrate” with Doro’s Dream Team presents a smile-producing mix of gusts and growls you’ll no doubt want to hit the playback for just to take it all in.

Both maxi-single contains a new track, “Rescue Me” on “Celebrate” and “Share My Fate” for “Herzblut.” “Rescue Me” is the better of the two and the more polished. Dreamy and romantic, “Rescue Me” is further proof positive nobody can field a power ballad with ease as Doro can. Not far off from her “Let Love Rain On Me,” (or even “Walking With the Angels” on Fear No Evil) this one draws Doro’s flock in with its passionate yearning. Whenever Doro Pesch settles upon a mate in this life, said partner will be the recipient of some heaven-sent wooing, bank on that.

“Share My Fate” has a raw, slightly unfinished tone to it, yet it has a prototype hammer down power edge that has a foreseeable future in Doro’s live sets. Fists up, willya?

Tack on the extra half star from the original review of Fear No Evil for a spiffy package, some worthwhile bonus songs and a gorgeous fold out featuring one of the finest and classiest ladies in all of show biz revealing her resplendent joy. The pop divas should stop a minute and see how it’s done before the proverbial pan sears finality in their eyes. This is why Doro Pesch has enjoyed longevity over the course of three decades. All we are, all we are we are…we are all…you know the rest.

Rating: ****

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Mexico’s INFINITUM OBSCURE will enter a Los Angeles studio on May 29 with producer/engineer Bill Metoyer (SLAYER, W.A.S.P., LIZZY BORDEN, TROUBLE) to begin recording the band’s second album.

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