Posts Tagged “Love”


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Melodic technical metal band Subversion comes back swinging from a short hiatus with a new sound, new label, and a taste for blood. Rogue Records America is proud to announce the signing of Subversion for a two album deal for publishing and distribution, which includes a bundle with the new album and the band’s previous EP. Dean Martinetti of Rogue Records comments: “I remember hearing Subversion a while back, actually putting them on one of our compilations Songs in the Key of D and thinking how much I’d love to work with them one day… well that day has finally come and I am super excited.

The post Subversion Signs Deal With Rogue Records appeared first on Daily Heavy Metal News.

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Heavy-as-balls UK post-punk mainstays October File have unleashed a new song.

Heroes Are Welcome is taken from the band’s brand new album, The Application of Loneliness, Ignorance, Misery, Love and Despair - An Introspective of the Human Condition, out May 26 via Candlelight.

The guys also play Bloodstock in August. Head to bloodstock.uk.com and grab your ticket right now! Bloodstock 2014 takes place August 7-10 at Catton Hall, Derby and is headlined by Down, Emperor and Megadeth.

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Canadian multi-instrumentalist, singer, songwriter and producer Devin Townsend was interviewed on the March 7-9 edition of Full Metal Jackie‘s nationally syndicated radio show. You can now listen to the chat using the Podbean widget below.

To see a full list of stations carrying the program and when it airs, go to FullMetalJackieRadio.com.

The cover artwork for the forthcoming debut album from the CASUALTIES OF COOL project from Devin Townsend can be seen below.

Devin recently launched a three-month-long crowdfunding campaign on PledgeMusic for CASUALTIES OF COOL since the album will be released without record-label backing.

In a 2013 interview with BluntMag.com.au, Devin stated about CASUALTIES OF COOL: “If there’s anybody who’s new to what I do, who maybe heard ‘Liberation’ or some of the songs off ‘Epicloud’ and thought, ‘This is really cool, I could get into this,’ you’re going to hate CASUALTIES. [laughs] I mean, really, it’s as opposite of ‘Epicloud’ as ‘Ghost’ was to ‘Deconstruction’. It’s this weird, dark, not evil but verging on it, bluesy, Johnny Cash-y, strange, quiet folk record. But I love it, it’s the one record that I’ve done over the past 10 or 15 years where I can truly say, ‘This is where I am right now.’

“You know, the other things that I’ve done have been as well in their own right, ‘Epicloud’, ‘Deconstruction’ and ‘Addicted!’, but there was an agenda with those, I was trying to say something with them or I was trying to prove a point, make a statement about the past or whatever. CASUALTIES is something that I’ve done without any pressure, without anybody telling me what to do, without showing it to anyone, it’s just what evolved when I wasn’t thinking about it. As a result of that, I’m incredibly proud of it, but it remains to be seen whether or not other people will resonate with it. I think they will, man. I think it’s fucking awesome, and I mean, I haven’t smoked weed in a long time but I can’t imagine that it wouldn’t be awesome while you’re smoking. [laughs]”

Asked where CASUALTIES OF COOL will fit into the Devin Townsend discography in terms of sound — among his more traditional-sounding albums, or a bit more removed like his ambient albums, Devin said: “Somewhere in the middle, you know, somewhere in the middle. It’s like, if you took the weird elements of ‘Ki’ and the weird elements of ‘Devlab’ and added a vintage sort of vibe.

“My management had a suggestion, which I think is pretty cool, which was, ‘You shouldn’t call it DEVIN TOWNSEND PROJECT, you shouldn’t even put your name on it, just call it CASUALTIES OF COOL and put it out as its own thing.’ It’s got a different singer, I sing on like half of it right, but it’s got this lady [Vancouver artist Ché Aimee Dorval, who also appears on ‘Ki’] who’s just this brilliant singer, she’s a young, despondent-sounding bluesy vocalist and it’s creepy. I think that that might be a way for me to get away with it, putting it out without it being part of the DTP [DEVIN TOWNSEND PROJECT] or whatever.

“I don’t know what to tell you, man. I just go where it feels the most honest to go, then I deal with people thinking it’s weird afterwards. [laughs]”

Regarding whether there is a particular atmosphere he wants to create or a story he wants to convey with CASUALTIES OF COOL, Devin said: “Yeah there’s a story, definitely. It’s going to take a little longer than what we’ve got for me to explain it, but you’ll hear it eventually. I want it to be something you listen to quietly, by yourself, in the middle of the night, with a big old full moon outside. It’ll work perfectly.”

Interview (audio):

devintownsendcasualtiescover

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Showcasing the band’s love of llamas, the zany punk/metal duo of Do I Scare Ya?

The post Do I Scare Ya? Posts “Llama Llama Ding Dong” Music Video appeared first on Daily Heavy Metal News.

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The Great Southern Brainfart recently conducted an interview with GWAR frontman Oderus Urungus. A couple of excerpts from the chat follow below.

The Great Southern Brainfart: This is an exciting time to be a GWAR fan. After the passing of Flattus Maximus, it was really awesome to see the metal community pull together to support the band and his immediate family. It made me feel proud to be a fan of a band. When you saw that outpouring of love how did it make you feel?

Oderus: Well, it made us feel very proud to have such awesome fans. They weren’t going to let us fail or stop and they were going to support us every step of the way. They all came out and showed us how much they really love us and it really meant a lot to us. We couldn’t have done it without their strength and we may have never made it through that period. There’s not a day that goes by that we don’t miss Flattus but somehow we’ve made it through and Pustulous Maximus is settled in his new position and he’s kicking fucking ass. Life goes on.

The Great Southern Brainfart: What can you tell us about Pustulous Maximus and what can we all expect to see from him?

Oderus: Well, he’s a little bigger than Flattus. He’s a little more obnoxious and meaner. He’s a little more rowdy on stage and he breaks more stuff. His guitar playing is a big more vicious as well. He’s a different player than Flattus. Flattus has a smoother shredding style whereas Pustulous is just all over the fucking place. He’s capable of playing the smooth shit but yet he can play incredibly vicious as well. His sound has definitely taken GWAR into a new direction musically. I’m not exactly sure what that direction is. Maybe even a little more like our old-school thrash metal kind of sound. It definitely doesn’t sound like “Bloody Pit Of Horror”, that’s for sure.

The Great Southern Brainfart: I’ve been listening to the new album, “Battle Maximus”, a good bit and I fucking love this album. It sounds more like the old-school stuff than anything GWAR‘s done in years. Was that intentional or was this brought on by the new blood, pun intended?

Oderus: [laughs] No, it just kind of happened naturally. We just kind of let it kind of rally behind Pustulous‘ playing and we didn’t try to make it go in any direction. We just let it kind of organically suggest itself. That’s the way Pustulous sounds when he plays guitar so there for GWAR followed right along with him. It’s got the sound of those old GWAR albums but it has the additional excellence of the fact that it sounds better. We’ve been in the studio longer and we know what we’re doing now. We’ve got our own studio and we know exactly how to get the best sounds out of it. It’s got that old-school GWAR sound that everyone likes, but it sounds better than all the old records.

The Great Southern Brainfart: Looking back on GWAR‘s vast catalog, is there anything you look at and say, “I wish we would’ve done that differently?”

Oderus: Nah, I wouldn’t change a fucking thing. If you change anything about GWAR, you might ruin something that was incredibly perfect. I’m not really how GWAR started to begin with, but I do know that it’s hard to change or mess around with it very much. You could ruin that balance that made it so great to begin with. I’ve been completely satisfied with everything we’ve done. I wouldn’t change a goddamn thing.

The Great Southern Brainfart: GWAR not too long ago released a great cover of ALICE COOPER‘s “School’s Out”. Are there any future covers that we can look forward to hearing GWAR unleash on us?

Oderus: Right now we are working on a cover of “Get Out of My Dreams, Get Into My Car” by BILLY OCEAN for The AV Club. We did KANSAS“Carry On My Wayward Son” last year, so we’re doing this one this year. Matter of fact, I wouldn’t be surprised if you see an entire GWAR covers album at some point.

Read the entire interview at The Great Southern Brainfart.

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Karl Lean of Australia’s Heavy magazine recently conducted an interview with THE CULT singer Ian Astbury. A couple of excerpts from the chat follow below.

On the band’s heavy touring schedule:

Astbury: “It’s what we do. Since we started we’ve been live musicans, it’s always been live first. Recording, record deals, career and everything else came afterwards. It was really just about playing in bars to start with.”

“The band’s been rolling pretty consistently the past 7 or 8 years, and we just don’t want to stop. We’ve got momentum, we’ve got the album out and it’s going strong.

‘Choice Of Weapon’ did really really well. Previous to that, we did the Capsule collection, and previous to that, we did the ‘Love’ tour, which was great. That was kind of inspired by seeing Bowie do the ‘Low’ album, probably one of the first artists to go out and play an album, an iconic record in its entirety. So for us, we’re between albums right now, but we want to keep playing.”

On performing the “Electric” album in its entirety:

Astbury: “A lot these songs we’ve never played live.

“We don’t really think of this material as ‘old’; the action of playing live makes it all become fresh. It’s always like kind of an external perception of what we do; there’s memories and connections to a piece or body of work. So for us, ‘Electric 13′ is those ‘Electric’ songs brought alive again. We’re probably better musicans now than we were then; we’re at the top of our game right now. The shows have been amazing. The band’s on fire. It’s the most consistent lineup we’ve had. We’ve been playing together for 7 or 8 years, so it’s really tight.”

On offering plenty more than just a nostalgia trip for older fans:

Astbury: “We don’t identify ourselves as classic rock. To me, that term is like an old custodian. But this band is vital, it’s virile, aggressive, guttural. It can be sublime, it can be violent, it can be poetic. Within that is the essence of THE CULT. We have 9 studio albums and a history of working different genres — from hard rock to modern alternative post rock; very eclectic. We are still here.”

On the ups and downs of touring life:

Astbury: “Touring has always been a grind. It’s a tough lifestyle. It’s not like every day you get to be in Sydney, or Tokyo, or New York, or Paris.

“Touring is basically going from venue to venue. We just drove 10 hours from our last gig to here in Biloxi, Mississippi. Tomorrow we’ll do a 14-hour drive to the next show.

“The drives are really long, especially here in the States. And it’s the down times that you get into trouble. You try and keep your head together and not get into trouble.

“I much prefer driving to flying, though; all that sitting in airports. You don’t get offstage until after midnight, and you’ll have a flight at 9 in the morning. By the time you get cleaned up, you never sleep; you’re constantly tired, living on caffeine. That’s what it is.

“You chose the lifestyle and I’m not going to cry about that; it’s just the reality of touring. But once you do get on stage, it’s like catharsis, a release — that’s the time you really get to express yourself and it’s gratifying having an audience that has stayed with the band for so long.”

Read more from Heavy magazine.

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Karl Lean of Australia’s Heavy magazine recently conducted an interview with THE CULT singer Ian Astbury. A couple of excerpts from the chat follow below.

On the band’s heavy touring schedule:

Astbury: “It’s what we do. Since we started we’ve been live musicans, it’s always been live first. Recording, record deals, career and everything else came afterwards. It was really just about playing in bars to start with.”

“The band’s been rolling pretty consistently the past 7 or 8 years, and we just don’t want to stop. We’ve got momentum, we’ve got the album out and it’s going strong.

‘Choice Of Weapon’ did really really well. Previous to that, we did the Capsule collection, and previous to that, we did the ‘Love’ tour, which was great. That was kind of inspired by seeing Bowie do the ‘Low’ album, probably one of the first artists to go out and play an album, an iconic record in its entirety. So for us, we’re between albums right now, but we want to keep playing.”

On performing the “Electric” album in its entirety:

Astbury: “A lot these songs we’ve never played live.

“We don’t really think of this material as ‘old’; the action of playing live makes it all become fresh. It’s always like kind of an external perception of what we do; there’s memories and connections to a piece or body of work. So for us, ‘Electric 13′ is those ‘Electric’ songs brought alive again. We’re probably better musicans now than we were then; we’re at the top of our game right now. The shows have been amazing. The band’s on fire. It’s the most consistent lineup we’ve had. We’ve been playing together for 7 or 8 years, so it’s really tight.”

On offering plenty more than just a nostalgia trip for older fans:

Astbury: “We don’t identify ourselves as classic rock. To me, that term is like an old custodian. But this band is vital, it’s virile, aggressive, gutteral. It can be sublime, it can be violent, it can be poetic. Within that is the essence of THE CULT. We have 9 studio albums and a history of working different genres — from hard rock to modern alternative post rock; very eclectic. We are still here.”

On the ups and downs of touring life:

Astbury: “Touring has always been a grind. It’s a tough lifestyle. It’s not like every day you get to be in Sydney, or Tokyo, or New York, or Paris.

“Touring is basically going from venue to venue. We just drove 10 hours from our last gig to here in Biloxi, Mississippi. Tomorrow we’ll do a 14-hour drive to the next show.

“The drives are really long, especially here in the States. And it’s the down times that you get into trouble. You try and keep your head together and not get into trouble.

“I much prefer driving to flying, though; all that sitting in airports. You don’t get offstage until after midnight, and you’ll have a flight at 9 in the morning. By the time you get cleaned up, you never sleep; you’re constantly tired, living on caffeine. That’s what it is.

“You chose the lifestyle and I’m not going to cry about that; it’s just the reality of touring. But once you do get on stage, it’s like catharsis, a release — that’s the time you really get to express yourself and it’s gratifying having an audience that has stayed with the band for so long.”

Read more from Heavy magazine.

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We were joined by our friend Bob from Relapse Records as well as Jake on this edition of the Livecast. Rob discussed attending the SiriusXM Metallica concert the night prior, as well as attending a screening of their 3D movie. Bob talked about his love of Prince and ICP. This music business ended up being …

The post METAL INJECTION LIVECAST #227 – Sonic Quality of the Sound appeared first on Metal Injection.

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AltRockLive.com conducted an interview with drummer James Cassells of the British metalcore act ASKING ALEXANDRIA at the Aftershock festival, which took place September 14-15 at Discovery Park in Sacramento, California. You can now watch the chat below.

ASKING ALEXANDRIA‘s third album, “From Death To Destiny”, sold 38,000 copies in the United States in its first week of release to land at position No. 6 on The Billboard 200 chart.

In a recent interview with Kill Your Stereo, ASKING ALEXANDRIA guitarist Ben Bruce stated about the band’s musical progression on “From Death To Destiny”: “When we recorded ‘Stand Up And Scream’, we were kids — we were 17 to 19 years old. We all loved ’80s music then. [However] I don’t think we were brave enough or competent enough to show our passion for ’80s rock back then at the time. With ‘Reckless And Relentless’, it was the same thing; there was a little bit more of it and you could see our ’80s rock ‘n’ roll love coming through, but again, I don’t think we had the balls to go out and fully do it. But this time around, we sat down and intentionally said, ‘OK, we want to show our love of ’80s music in this record.’ But we don’t want it to sound like a regurgitated ’80s album because we’ve been there, we’ve done that. It wouldn’t be fun, it wouldn’t be fresh and it wouldn’t work, so we had the challenge to try and incorporate modern day rock and metal into our love and passion for the ’80s. I think we did a really did a good job of it.”

Asked how important social lmedia is in promoting a band like ASKING ALEXANDRIA, Bruce said: “I think it’s a vital part of promoting a band. There are so many different bands out there. It’s not like back in the day where you were put in a magazine and everyone would subscribe to that magazine. You knew lots of people were going to read about you in a magazine. These days, magazines still sell but they’ve taken a huge hit, just as record sales have. The biggest platform anyone has these days to release any information regarding whatever it may be, for instance, our new album, is the Internet. The harder you work at that and try and connect with your fans, the more they feel a connection with their favorite band and therefore the more interested they become. It grows. We have 3.5 million followers on our Facebook page, which is a shit-ton of people. [laughs] You can’t even imagine 3.5 million people. Although it’s just a number on a screen, essentially you are writing a letter to each one of these people to tell them about our album coming out or we’ll be playing this city on this day, so I think it’s absolutely vital these days to make the most of your social networking.”

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Due to personal reasons, guitarist Ross Ragusa has chosen to amicably part ways with Connecticut based metal band Dead by Wednesday. Ross states, “I love my brothers in DBW, I wish them nothing but success, as they deserve it for the years of hard work they put into this project

The post Dead By Wednesday Splits With Guitarist Ross Ragusa appeared first on Daily Heavy Metal News.

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