Posts Tagged “Music Business”

Robb Flynn of San Francisco Bay Area metallers MACHINE HEAD has posted the latest installment of his online blog, “The General Journals: Diary Of A Frontman… And Other Ramblings”. It follows below in its entirety.

“I’m in a shitty mood.

“Not for the story I’m about to tell, but because of my thoughts afterward.

“I went out to San Francisco for my buddy Joe‘s birthday shenanigans. We went out for Moroccan food at a joint called El Mansour. The place had a great vibe, belly dancing, sword balancing, and amazing food! The lamb in particular was to-freakin’-die-for, slow roasted and covered in honey and cinnamon.

“On the way out there, Joe‘s buddy Tony picked me up from JingleTown [studio], since I didn’t want to drive as I knew I’d be drinking. On the hour-long trip out (Saturday traffic to San Francisco), he was telling me some pretty awesome stories about growing up in the ”70s. You see, Tony was a teenager in 1975, and used to go the famous San Francisco venue Winterland. Winterland was before my time, but being part of the scene you heard the legend, the stories and the history.

Tony is a big BLACK SABBATH fan, saw them back in ’75 on the ‘Sabotage’ tour and said it was a life-changing experience. Him and his buddies used to go to Winterland, load up on LSD, cigarettes, and weed, and go watch pretty much the cream of the crop of classic rock bands. TED NUGENT, SABBATH, DEEP PURPLE, JOURNEY, MONTROSE, you name it, he went and saw it. The shows would start and if people loved the opening band (essentially cheering non-stop) they’d get to do encores. He was telling me about a show JOURNEY (the opener!), killed it, and they got 4 encores, the support band got 4 encores! Then the headliner, MONTROSE, got 5 ENCORES! MONTROSE didn’t stop playing until 2:30 in the morning, everyone stayed, no one would even dare consider leaving and people experienced some of the best music of their lives.

“An opener getting encores, crazy…

“And the venue allowed things like this to happen. The venue just kept the bands rolling.

“Not only that, but all of the shows at Winterland were $4.50.

“4 dollars and 50 cents…..18 freakin’ quarters!

“Wow…?!?

“All I could think of was ‘what an amazing time for music.’

“People wonder why the ‘classic rock’ bands were so good. They were playing by their own rules, and they had a culture of venues and people around that were as crazy and fly-by-the-seat-of-their-pants as the bands themselves. The promoters around that time did anything to make the bands happy and if it meant playing all goddamn night? Let ’em!

“I tell you right now, though, there isn’t a band out there who would play til 2:30 a.m. nowadays, let alone find a major venue that would even ALLOW such a thing.

“I remember when I first started going to /playing thrash shows, it was a very similar thing. It was no rules, no security, no safety, no curfews, and for the most part anything went!
Venues these days are mostly run with union workers. In most major cities, you have to take breaks during the day, where a band can’t even sound check for an hour because the union workers need a ‘break.’ Nowadays if you play 1 minute past 11 p.m. at any of the large union venues, it costs the band $1,000 dollars a minute. When we were out with METALLICA playing arenas they regularly play 20 minutes past 11:00 p.m., and they regularly paid $20,000 to do so.

“I went and saw PEARL JAM about a month ago, and they played one of the best, most truly rock ‘n’ roll shows I’ve seen in eons. It was fucking magical, Eddie Vedder drank 3 bottles of wine, and about 2 hours into the set, he started getting a little sloppy, forgetting lyrics, missing cues, it looked like it was about to fall off the rails. The band then they took a quick break and he came back and played ‘Black’.

“Let me tell you, it was magic! I’m getting goose bumps writing this, just remembering it. It was such a turn-around; it totally took the night to an even higher level. At this point they were already 45 minutes past 11. They played several more songs and eventually the Oakland Arena (currently called the Oracle Arena, until some different stupid corporate sponsor buys it and changes it to something ridiculous like Florida’s 1-800-Ask Gary Amphitheater) turned on the house lights, signaling them to stop. PEARL JAM said ‘fuck you!’ and played 2 more songs with the house lights on! Eddie Vedder then brought the band back out onstage to do an extra-long goodbye to the crowd. I love their fucking attitude.

“In the end, they played 70 minutes over ‘curfew’ and I’d imagine left Oakland about $70,000 dollars lighter to do so. Of course PEARL JAM can afford it, and frankly it gave every single person there one of the best shows of their life. But this gesture to keep the ‘room’ in a good mood in conjunction with the Winterland conversation, it got me thinking.

“Shit has changed.

“On the one hand, I love PEARL JAM‘s ‘fuck you, were doing it our way’ attitude, and on the other hand, it angered and depressed me.

“Only the METALLICAs and PEARL JAMs can pull things like this. Bands that have sold millions of records, and they can afford it.

“If MACHINE HEAD tried playing an hour over curfew at say, the House Of Blues in Dallas, Texas, we’d be walking out of there with our entire guarantee eaten up. Even if the fans wanted it, some venue would do their best to shut it down, cut power, close curtain, whatever.

“The music business has sucked the life out of creativity. No one is encouraged to take risks, no one is encouraged to push the envelope, because it’s all about first-week sales! It’s about pointless radio play and how good your last tour went. How venues and promoters are squeezing the last drop of spontaneity out of your soul by not ‘allowing’ you to playing past curfew and not drawing outside the line.

“When we play that game, we essentially applaud mediocrity.

“There’s nothing dangerous about music these days, there’s nothing surprising about it either. There can’t be. Other than PEARL JAM, the only ‘band’ that doesn’t seem to really give a flying fuck and plays by their own rules isn’t really a band at all, are they? Axl and the ROSES are known for bending the rules and telling the powers that be to ‘fuck off,’ but because their band is so confusing they come across as a joke. But people don’t see this. People don’t see any of this!

“And the reason you don’t care is because it’s too easy to get sucked into your phone, or your Facebook, or your Twitter, or your Tumblr, or your Instagram, or your games, or your TV shows.

“Music isn’t important anymore. Say it is all you want, but the fact is, the 2 biggest rock records of last year only sold 400,000 copies, neither even went gold.

“Music is in the background of a game. Why go to a show when you can watch clips of it on YouTube and bitch about how it stinks live?

“And you know what, I miss music being important! I miss live shows being important. I miss feeling a part of something that was so high on my list I’d crawl through broken glass to get it.

“All this technology we have now that’s supposed to make us ‘connected?’ It’s making me feel more fucking disconnected than ever. I mean watching all the things that other people are doing that I’m not invited to or even a apart of? And yet at the same time completely disgusted by faux-self-importance it has given everyone, (here’s my dog or cat for the millionth time, here’s a selfie for the millionth time, here’s my kids for the millionth time, here’ the food I’m eating for the millionth time, here’s what I’m doing and you’re not). Don’t you wish you were eating what I’m eating?

“Fuck you!

I’ve thought of tweeting or Facebooking something so many time and just went, ‘who cares’, why should anyone care about this, and you SHOULDN’T care.

“You’re all my ‘friends,’ you’ve all ‘liked’ me, but really, you’re not my friends, because we don’t know each other. You took a photo of me, or you interviewed me, or we talked after a show. And after you get past the initial coolness, of re-connecting with someone from high school on Facebook or Twitter, you realize you truly have drifted apart.

“And fuckin’ A, I’m glad we did.

“I don’t want to be ‘friends’ with everyone; I don’t want to be ‘liked’ by everyone. I want to feel connected to something. And nothing I look at in the music business does that. I don’t get radio bands; I don’t get any of these fucking ‘scene bands.’ I don’t get bands singing about how great being American is, as if the geographic location you were born, (and had zero control over in any way shape or form), somehow makes us better than any other geographical place of birth!?

“I don’t get why people don’t want to see live music anymore, I don’t get it. Did you see the clip of Hetfield talking about how America needs to start ‘wanting’ music again? This is James ‘Fucking’ Hetfield talking, people! Didn’t those words do anything to anyone? Didn’t what he said make you feel a bit disgusted? I’m a METALLICA fan and those words being spoken kind of stung a bit.

“You can bitch all you want that MACHINE HEAD only does festival tours and only plays for 30 minutes, but all those bands (including us) that play festival tours, can’t draw squat when were not on festival tours. And even the big metal festivals are having troubles. Maybe the days of bands touring is coming to an end? Bands didn’t always tour, you know, Mozart didn’t hit the road for a year or 2 back in the day. Touring is really a phenomenon of the last 60 years or so. People didn’t always buy records, or CDs, or files, or streams, that’s also a phenomenon of the last 60 or 70 years.

“I don’t get the political fucking correctness of music anymore.

“I don’t get the narrow-mindedness of the world anymore.

“I don’t get people asking me every week to try and write ‘more like ‘Burn My Eyes’, please.’

“I don’t get religious nutjobs who think that when they die they’re going to 72 virgins when they get to heaven. (‘You’re guaranteed to get some pussy in the afterlife, boys,’ so obviously written by a man!)

“I don’t get religious fucking nutjobs who think that Jesus is coming back soon, wearing a white, blood-stained robe (stained with the blood of his enemies…whoever those are) and will be carrying a sword, and by ‘sword,’ the bible meant an AR-15!

“What did Napoleon say? ‘Religion is what keeps the poor from murdering the rich.’

“I don’t get why we need to hear ‘America The Beautiful’ and ‘thank a soldier’ in a TV commercial, 22 and 14 times respectively during the Superbowl.

“I don’t fucking get it.

“You don’t care about music, and I don’t care about music, and I sit here wondering if this feeling is a result of the business itself, or is the business a result of our own apathy towards music.

I feel lost.

“I feel alone.

“Something has to change.

“Someone has to stir the pot.

“Something needs to come along and wake us up out of the slumber.”

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Former JUDAS PRIEST guitarist Kenneth “K.K.” Downing spoke to Midland Rocks about his shocking April 2011 announcement that he was leaving the band prior to their “Epitaph” world tour.

Downing, who recently started a career as a rock promoter under the banner The Future Of Heavy Metal, says that, contrary to popular belief, he didn’t retire from the music business.

“I’ll never get away from this retirement thing, but what happened was that I quit,” Downing explains. “Retired implies that I am not physically able to do it. I am able to do it, but I didn’t want to do it; I just wasn’t enjoying it anymore

“A lot of things had changed. I think I counted about thirty reasons why I didn’t want to do it at the time, and that is an awful lot of reasons.

“In all honesty, I think that in so many respects it had run its course.

“If you’re part of a songwriting team, you get the recognition and reward for creating something, but for me, PRIEST became about going out and playing live and replicating exactly what people had enjoyed ten, twenty or thirty years ago. The fans would be just as happy if they could see us bin all of the modern guitars we now play and take them on a walk down memory lane, because I think that’s what people enjoy most. And I understand that, because if I could go out now and see Eric Clapton with CREAM, then I would be the happiest person in the world.”

He continues: “One of the beautiful things about being in the industry was the ability to continue to invent and create, constructing songs and making good records. You do feel the need to be creative, and that was taken away with the downloading thing, and as you get older, the balance of the scales starts to tip. So if you can’t be creative, why would you want to continue to dedicate the time into something?

“I suppose if the industry was still healthy and people still had to spend their hard-earned money buying a record, it would be different, but if you give something away, then it has no value.

“We used to buy an album and think, ‘Well, it’s not that good, but I’ll play it a million times [and] I’m sure I’ll get into it, and now it doesn’t really get a second chance.

“In the past, there was always the opportunity to create a record like ‘Dark Side Of The Moon’ [PINK FLOYD] or ‘British Steel’ [JUDAS PRIEST] or ‘Back In Black’ [AC/DC] that would be one of those albums that would be indelible and people will always come back to. And I think that opportunity has gone now, and I think it would take a miracle for one of those to happen again.

“If you consider an album like [JUDAS PRIEST‘s much-maligned conceptual effort] ‘Nostradamus’, then if that had been released in 1978, then it would have been another ‘Dark Side Of The Moon’, but it is all about the timing.

“When you think about it, in the early days, we had the opportunity to write great songs, play great solos and have great vocal performances, but people get used to it and it is hard now to get the reaction of, ‘Wow, have you heard the new PRIEST album?’

“The industry has changed so much… I see companies that are repackaging and rehashing, and that started happening to us, and that was not a pretty thing to be a part of. It’s kind of duping the fans a bit, because there are fans around the world that have got to have everything to complete their collection, so even if there are only a few thousand of them, if you put out a box collection, it might be $100, which is a lot of dollars, and so for me, that is something that I didn’t get into music for.”

Downing‘s place in JUDAS PRIEST was filled by new guitarist Richie Faulkner.

JUDAS PRIEST is currently writing and recording material for a new studio album, to be released sometime next year.

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We were joined by our friend Bob from Relapse Records as well as Jake on this edition of the Livecast. Rob discussed attending the SiriusXM Metallica concert the night prior, as well as attending a screening of their 3D movie. Bob talked about his love of Prince and ICP. This music business ended up being …

The post METAL INJECTION LIVECAST #227 – Sonic Quality of the Sound appeared first on Metal Injection.

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Mat Sinner (PRIMAL FEAR, SINNER) was interviewed on the latest edition of “The Classic Metal Show”, which is heard live on Saturdays from 9 p.m. to 3 a.m. EST at TheClassicMetalShow.com. You can now listen to the chat using the audio player below.

SINNER‘s album of re-recorded versions of the best songs from the band’s early years, “Touch Of Sin 2” (in a nod to SINNER‘s 1985 album, “Touch Of Sin”), was released on August 30 in Europe and September 10 in North America via AFM Records.

Commented Sinner: “When we were younger and new to the music business, we were proud to be part of the Noise Records family and to get the chance to sign a contract with them. Reading this contract so many years later, you can’t but shake your head in disbelief and wonder what must have possessed us. The exclusive rights to the recordings have since been bought and sold numerous times with the effect that none of those who owned them has ever had any relation to either the production itself or to how it was created.

“Today, the older SINNER songs still enjoy great popularity within the scene. We continue to play them live, even though the CDs aren’t available any longer. It is Universal who owns the albums at the moment — but does not distribute the CDs. Therefore, they’re to be held responsible that CDs from this era can only be purchased at exorbitant prices. Unfortunately, the musicians and songwriters involved have no means of dealing with the matter — our hands are tied.

“When I offered to do a remix on several songs for a best-of album, I was told that the original tapes have mysteriously disappeared and were probably burned in an ‘accidental’ fire. That much about the pearls of our past.

AFM Records and I — business partners for many years — came up with the idea to once again record the best songs from this era. The album was supposed to feature several guests and to come with a wicked fan package. Initially, I was sceptical. But recent shows have shown the amount of fun and energy the band would put into these songs. However, I will only put this plan into action under one condition: the whole band has to lock themselves into the studio and record the whole thing together. I’m fed up with the assumption that it works if everyone records their stuff at home or comes cheaper. That’s bullshit — this challenge meets us at exactly the right time and we’ll face it!”

“Touch Of Sin 2”, which was mixed by Achim Köhler (PRIMAL FEAR, BRAINSTORM), features guest appearances by David Readman (PINK CREAM 69, VOODOO CIRCLE), Erik Martensson (ECLIPSE, W.E.T.), Tom Naumann (PRIMAL FEAR) and Diego Valdez (HELKER).

“Touch Of Sin 2” track listing:

01. Born To Rock
02. Comin’ Out Fighting
03. Bad Girl
04. Knife In My Heart
05. Concrete Jungle
06. Don’t Believe A Word
07. Shout
08. Germany Rocks
09. Danger Zone
10. Emerald
11. Blood On The Sand
12. Lost In A Minute
13. Masquerade
14. Heat Of The City

The official lyric video for “Comin’ Out Fighting” can be seen below.

SINNER‘s latest album, “One Bullet Left”, was released in September 2011 via AFM Records, the CD was recorded in Stuttgart, Germany with Mat Sinner producing and Achim Köhler engineering.

SINNER‘s current lineup features Mat Sinner (bass, vocals) and guitarist Christof Leim (THE NEW BLACK) along with Alexander Scholpp (TARJA, FARMER BOYS) on guitar, André Hilgers (RAGE) on drums and Alexander Beyrodt (PRIMAL FEAR, VOODOO CIRCLE) on third guitar.


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Last week, Do512 blog conducted an interview with MEGADETH mainman Dave Mustaine. A couple of excerpts from the chat follow below.

Do512: With such a huge catalog of music, how does MEGADETH form their set list from night to night?

Mustaine: It always changes. Sometimes we’ll have a set that we use for the entire tour, sometimes there will be a song that we are working in or out of the set and it just doesn’t come together as a song to be performed live very well, or it will be in the wrong spot so we’ll move it around a little bit because the show is all about timing, too. When you go to the circus, they don’t bring the lions out first because everyone would split. The music business is so competitive now, you really want to make sure your show is a full-on experience… Our catalog is so vast, we could do a set with a band like FOREIGNER or JOURNEY or we could go out and do this thing with [IRON] MAIDEN which is the current setlist we’re talking about. We added “Tornado Of Souls” back into it. And we can do the same thing when we do the set with [BLACK] SABBATH. We should make a set list for that that’s totally unique and killer just for that tour.

Do512: Outside of music, outside of your life in MEGADETH, what do you like to do in your free time and with your family?

Mustaine: I like to read a lot. I’m very curious about history, world history, American history. I went to school to be a stockbroker; I’m a New York Times bestselling author. I have three black belts in various martial arts styles. I like to golf. I used to skydive and do stuff like bungee jumping but then I had a surgery on my neck which makes it a little difficult for me to do anything that’s going to be dangerous for my neck. Those are some of the things I like to do. I like to surf. I used to skateboard but again with the neck thing, hitting the ground hard or something like that can be very painful. [laughs] We also have horses and I love exotic cars. I have an Aston Martin Vanquish S that I just got. I am really grateful that our fans have supported us and given me the opportunity to have a neat car or have a car at all. That’s why when we get out onstage we work as hard as we do and we sign autographs. Man, I remember signing autographs in the snow with wet hair! It’s not comfortable, but it’s the right thing to do.

Do512: What do you see the future holding for MEGADETH in the next 5 to 10 years?

Mustaine: I think for the next five years we are going to try and maintain where we are at and just build on the legacy we have right now. We’re at that point now where we’ve gone from being just a historic heavy metal band to getting into those legacy periods where you either go out in a blaze of glory or you kind of fizzle out and people say, “Oh, them again?” And I think right now we’re doing everything right.

Read the entire interview at Do512 blog.

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Wait, what? Ol' Drake just quit Evile? Why do bad things keep happening to good bands! Come on in and read all the details… According to the man himself: "Over the past year, I've, unfortunately, found myself becoming more and more detached from the touring/band lifestyle. In my opinion, the music business for a band …

The post EVILE Guitarist OL' DRAKE Quits appeared first on Metal Injection.

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Sad faces around the Metal Hammer office today as it’s been revealed that mecha-talented guitarist Ol Drake has left Evile!

“It’s been half my life (15 years) since I started jamming in a room with three other guys, in a group in which I didn’t know would grow to be Evile, go through what Evile has gone through and achieve what Evile has so far achieved,” says the man himself in a statement. “Since 1999, I’ve put 100% of my time and life into the band we formed, while us all had/have to sacrifice a lot financially and personally along the way. I’ve had some of the best times of my life in the past 15 years and met some amazing and fascinating people. I’ve had the huge honour to play a part in so many things I’d never have dreamed of: paying tribute to Dimebag [Pantera] by covering Cemetery Gates in Metal Hammer; supporting Megadeth, Exodus and many bands I grew up listening to; playing and recording with Destruction; touring/seeing places in the world I’d never have got to see otherwise and many more.

“Over the past year, I’ve, unfortunately, found myself becoming more and more detached from the touring/band lifestyle. In my opinion, the music business for a band of our genre and ‘level’ determines a very unrealistic way of life to me, and I personally find it difficult to make a living and have a ‘normal’ life. This is not a plea for sympathy, I’m simply being honest. I’ve reached a point where I want a family/kids, a house, a steady and definite income and everything in between, and in regard to my personal preferences, a touring band’s income and uncertainties, in the state that I feel they would continue to be in, has become incompatible with how I feel and what I want/need.

Evile: Flying the thrash flag

“There is no animosity between the rest of the band and I. This is purely a personal and financial decision I’ve been mulling over for a while and I wish them all the best for the future. I am not unappreciative of the position Evile has in the music world; I know a lot of people would love to be where Evile are. I want to thank each and every person who supports the band, and I want to extend a special thanks to Digby and the Earache Records crew. Huge apologies to anyone this disappoints, but I have to do what makes sense to me. I am not quitting writing or playing; I do plan on continuing to record and write my own music (solo project, general composing/recording etc), I just won’t be touring etc. I’ll still be playing the two upcoming festival shows Evile have.

“You can keep up to date with what I’ll be doing on my Twitter or on Facebook. A big thank you to everyone!”

Evile remain with Ol’s brother Matt, bassist Joel Graham and drummer Ben Carter.

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Guitarist Ol Drake has announced his departure from British thrashers EVILE.

His official statement on the matter reads as follows:

“It’s been half my life (15 years) since I started jamming in a room with three other guys, in a group in which I didn’t know would grow to be EVILE, go through what EVILE has gone through and achieve what EVILE has so far achieved.

“Since 1999, I’ve put 100% of my time and life into the band we formed, while us all had/have to sacrifice a lot financially and personally along the way.

“I’ve had some of the best times of my life in the past 15 years and met some amazing and fascinating people. I’ve had the huge honour to play a part in so many things I’d never have dreamed of: paying tribute to Dimebag [PANTERA] by covering ‘Cemetery Gates’ in Metal Hammer; supporting MEGADETH, EXODUS and many bands I grew up listening to; playing and recording with DESTRUCTION; touring/seeing places in the world I’d never have got to see otherwise and many more.

“Over the past year, I’ve, unfortunately, found myself becoming more and more detached from the touring/band lifestyle.

“In my opinion, the music business for a band of our genre and ‘level’ determines a very unrealistic way of life to me, and I personally find it difficult to make a living and have a ‘normal’ life.

“This is not a plea for sympathy, I’m simply being honest.

“I’ve reached a point where I want a family/kids, a house, a steady and definite income and everything in between, and in regard to my personal preferences, a touring band’s income and uncertainties, in the state that I feel they would continue to be in, has become incompatible with how I feel and what I want/need.

“There is no animosity between the rest of the band and I. This is purely a personal and financial decision I’ve been mulling over for a while and I wish them all the best for the future.

“I am not unappreciative of the position EVILE has in the music world; I know a lot of people would love to be where EVILE are.

“I want to thank each and every person who supports the band, and I want to extend a special thanks to Digby and the Earache Records crew.

“Huge apologies to anyone this disappoints, but I have to do what makes sense to me.

“I am not quitting writing or playing; I do plan on continuing to record and write my own music (solo project, general composing/recording etc), I just won’t be touring etc.

“I’ll still be playing the two upcoming festival shows EVILE have.

“You can keep up to date with what I’ll be doing on my Twitter or on Facebook.

“A big thank you to everyone!

EVILE released its fourth album, “Skull”, on May 27 in Europe on Earache Records and in North America via Century Media/Earache Records. The follow-up to 2011’s “Five Serpent’s Teeth” was once again recorded with producer Russ Russell (NAPALM DEATH, DIMMU BORGIR) at Parlour Studios in Kettering, England. The artwork for the album was painted by artist Eliran Kantor (TESTAMENT, SODOM, HATEBREED).

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Bending Reality TV conducted a short interview with QUEENSRŸCHE singer Geoff Tate at the fourth annual Vegas Rocks! Magazine Music Awards, which rocked the Joint at the Las Vegas Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Sunday night (August 25) with some of the most legendary rock artists in the music business. You can watch the chat below.

“Frequency Unknown”, the latest album from the Geoff Tate-fronted version of QUEENSRŸCHE, sold around 5,500 copies in its first week of release in the United States to land at position No. 82 on The Billboard 200 chart. Released on April 23, it was produced by Jason Slater at a studio in Northern California.

Tate‘s second solo album, “Kings & Thieves”, sold 1,800 copies in the United States in its first week of release. The CD arrived in stores on November 6, 2012 via InsideOut Music.

In an interview with ARTISTdirect.com, Tate stated about his vision for “Kings & Thieves”, “Typically, when I make a record, I have an idea of what I want to try to accomplish. I go about making that happen by making lists. I’m a list maker. I jot down all of these ideas I’ve got and I form those ideas into an outline. Then, I start using it as a punch list to take care of all these details I’d like to do. I knew I wanted to make a really solid rock record. I didn’t want to stray too far into other musical endeavors. I wanted to keep it more rock-oriented with traditional rock instruments. I also knew that I wanted it to be more of a live record where all of the musicians get in a room and actually play together. A lot of it was recorded and written at the same time. That was very fun, and I’ve never done that before. It has an effect that makes the music seem more immediate and raw rather than being a polished, rehearsed-into-the-ground record, which I’ve done throughout most of my career. Making this record was a different process for me, and I made it very quickly. It flowed from the moment I started until the time I was done with it. It only took about six months to make. By comparison, QUEENSRŸCHE records have taken years to make.”

Asked if there is any connection to his first solo record, Tate said, “Well, it has been a long time. It’s been a long time coming too. They’re two really different records to me. On that first solo record, I really wanted to stretch outside of the QUEENSRŸCHE box and do everything I could never do. I wanted to explore my influences in my writing. That first album has R&B influences, which I’m very into. It’s got classical and electronica influences, but it doesn’t have a lot of rock. ‘Kings & Thieves’ is really a rock record. I focused on that aspect.”

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Veteran musician and artist manager brings wealth of music industry experience to new role.

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