Posts Tagged “Peace”

Alter Bridge: taking over the UK in October

Alter Bridge have sat down with our buds at Classic Rock for an exclusive series detailing the making of their immense new album, Fortress!

Check out part one below:

Fortress is out September 30 via Roadrunner.

Fortress Track Listing

1. Cry Of Achilles
2. Addicted To Pain
3. Bleed It Dry
4. Lover
5. The Uninvited
6. Peace Is Broken
7. Calm The Fire
8. Waters Rising
9. Farther Than The Sun
10. Cry A River
11. All Ends Well
12. Fortress

Alter Bridge play the following dates with Shinedown and Halestorm later this year:

Oct 16: Nottingham Arena
Oct 17: Birmingham NIA
Oct 18: London Wembley Arena
Oct 20: Cardiff Motorpoint Arena
Oct 21: Glasgow Hydro
Oct 22: Manchester Arena

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U.K. technical death metal act Man Must Die is streaming the new track “On the Verge of Collapse.” The song appears on the upcoming release “Peace Was Never An Option,” the band’s fourth LP, which is due out on October 28th (EU) and November 12th (North America) via Lifeforce Records. The track list for the album is: 1

The post New Track “On The Verge Of Collapse” Streaming From Man Must Die appeared first on Daily Heavy Metal News.

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Alter Bridge: taking over the UK in October

Arena-filling rock heavyweights Alter Bridge have released a new video from their (fucking brilliant, if we do say so ourselves) new album Fortress, out September 30 via Roadrunner.

Watch Addicted To Pain here

Fortress Track Listing

1. Cry Of Achilles
2. Addicted To Pain
3. Bleed It Dry
4. Lover
5. The Uninvited
6. Peace Is Broken
7. Calm The Fire
8. Waters Rising
9. Farther Than The Sun
10. Cry A River
11. All Ends Well
12. Fortress

Alter Bridge play the following dates with Shinedown and Halestorm later this year:

Oct 16: Nottingham Arena
Oct 17: Birmingham NIA
Oct 18: London Wembley Arena
Oct 20: Cardiff Motorpoint Arena
Oct 21: Glasgow Hydro
Oct 22: Manchester Arena

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After legal action from former members over the name Kyuss Lives!, the band changed their name to Vista Chino. Their debut album Peace will appeal to Kyuss fans, but also has some different elements. I spoke with the band’s vocalist John Garcia about the creation of the new album, overcoming the legal issues, playing new material live and other topics.

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Uncle Phil: still fresh

Phil Anselmo has once again reiterated his desire to make peace with former Pantera bandmate Vinnie Paul in a new interview with Fuse TV.

“For me, really, I think it would mean a lot for Rex and  Vince and myself to sit down and, I guess, bury the hatchet where we can be on more friendly terms,” he muses. “And, you know, I think it would mean a lot to the fans. Without Vince, there’s not any Pantera reunion at all; it’s useless. But he damn well knows my door’s wide open. He needs to bust out the keys and unlock his, man. I’m waiting, but I’m not holding my breath.”

Check out the video here

Vinnie and Phil remain on non-speaking terms since the death of Vinnie’s brother and Pantera guitarist, Dimebag Darrell, in 2004.

 

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Man Must Die are all geared up to release their Peace Was Never An Option record on October 29 via Lifeforce Records. The band seem pretty stoked on it too. Man Must Die are back after a four year gap in their discography, the last record being 2009's No Tolerance for Imperfection. The record will …

The post MAN MUST DIE Announce New Album, Peace Was Never An Option appeared first on Metal Injection.

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Mike Portnoy says that bridges are finally being built between himself and his former bandmates in Dream Theater.

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Thom Yorke also says that project is too “complicated” to explain to people.

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John Parks of Legendary Rock Interviews recently conducted an interview with KORN guitarist and LOVE & DEATH frontman Brian “Head” Welch. A couple of excerpts from the chat follow below.

Legendary Rock Interviews: You’ve been pulling double shifts playing with KORN and opening up shows with LOVE & DEATH where you’re touring all over the world. You’re talking to me right now from a hotel room. Does your mind ever flash back to the differences between what you and KORN might have been doing 15 years ago on the road and the fact that you’re Skyping with your daughter from your room now??

Welch: Yeah, it’s crazy! I mean, back then I was just up to no good, up to no good at all, to the point where I really just ended up sick. Not necessarily sick in the sense of throwing up but just feeling sick and ill every night, towards the end of every night on tour back in the day. Now I really feel like we are having a better experience overall. It’s such a contrast from how it used to be; it’s a total 180.

Legendary Rock Interviews: All of the things that are involved with touring beyond the time you are on stage can be draining and the old demons can come in just from monotony or boredom. How are you staying sane out there?

Welch: I’ve found a lot of peace just working on music and staying busy with both of these bands. [laughs] I know what you mean, though — the demons can definitely creep in, and they still do, but now instead of getting drunk for, like, a week binge, I will find myself on a sugar binge for, like, five days. I got sick from eating sugar, like crazy, almost eating disorder levels of consuming sugar. [laughs] Then I fell into this dark depression because it made me feel all horrible; sugar makes me feel depressed, for some reason, after I eat it. It’s a chemical thing, it’s not like I’m being some whiny crybaby, it’s just chemically, for my make-up or whatever, sugar makes me feel really horrible. I don’t know if the grind on the road is just the loneliness or just the wear-and-tear on your emotions but all of the factors that make you think and feel normal can get clouded when you’re on the road, even when drugs and alcohol are out of the equation. It happens to everybody, but you just get through it and it makes the moments onstage that much more rewarding.

Legendary Rock Interviews: A lot of people are much more into the idea or receptive to the idea of KORN now that you are returning to the band. All respect to those guys but some people have questioned the motives. To be semi blunt, are you guys really all connected as brothers again or is this simply a great, calculated business move?

Welch: You know, everyone’s human. Everyone has mixed motives inside of themselves — me too — but I’m telling you, hanging out with these guys, connecting with them, working with them again and just seeing our lives happen… I’ve known these guys my whole life, but I’m seeing these guys lives again and a couple of them, their kids are hanging around and it’s all about family, which is huge. What we were talking about earlier, the win-win situation, that’s just it, it’s all win because we get to hang out, all of us, all of our families, some of which we haven’t seen in years. I think it helps the whole KORN family with me coming back, but I think it also helps what I’m doing with LOVE & DEATH. Everyone’s happy in every way with the end result no matter whether the beginning motives for one person might have been for KORN first and friendship second. I don’t know. I don’t think that’s the case, but even if it was, it is still a great situation for me.

Legendary Rock Interviews: So much attention has been placed on how you have changed in the years since you left KORN, but do you think sometimes people tend to overlook that your bandmates have evolved or changed in those years also?

Welch: Yeah, dude, and they really have — every single one of them. The only one I can’t really speak on, ’cause I haven’t hung out with him, is our old drummer, David [Silveria], but I wish nothing but the very best for him also. I am telling you, I am stoked to be telling you, that ever since I’ve been working with the KORN guys again, it has been amazing. Everyone’s positive, everyone gets along, there’s no drama anymore, and it’s such a change that at first I was tripping out. [laughs] You’re right, though — everyone talks about me, but all of those guys have evolved in their own way and people forget about that.

Read the entire interview at Legendary Rock Interviews.

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Joe Daly of The Weeklings recently conducted an interview with SLIPKNOT and STONE SOUR singer Corey Taylor. A couple of excerpts from the chat follow below.

The Weeklings: After reading [your new book, “A Funny Thing Happened On The Way To Heaven (Or, How I Made Peace With The Paranormal And Stigmatized Zealots And Cynics In The Process)”], it would seem that you’ve had considerably more paranormal experiences than most people. Do you think that’s true?

Corey Taylor: I think I’m definitely up there, but it’s not so much seeing them as much as it’s about having these experiences of things that I can’t explain. Trust me, I’m the first one to try to disprove things; I’m not the one who just jumps into the ghost pond just because my feet got wet. I really try to come at it from a different perspective, and I genuinely try to figure out if there’s a logical explanation behind some of this stuff. The stuff that I talk about in the book is the stuff that I just can’t explain from any angle. Yeah, there’s been a lot of stuff that’s happened to me over the years, and it seems like it’s happening more and more and more, but what people need to realize is that usually it’s happening in a place where I live or where I work, so these are places that I’m going to all the time. It’s not like I go into a house and I’m like, “Whoa… It’s haunted. It’s coming after me…” [laughs] These are things that tend to happen where I live, so it’s almost like a one-stop-shop kind of thing.

The Weeklings: With all these different experiences, have you noticed any common threads or any evidence that suggests why you, more than the average bear, seem to have these experiences?

Corey Taylor: I think it’s just something about my personality maybe, or the energy I give out — my soul, basically. In the book, I talk about one of the hypotheses I came up with, which is an idea called “The Intelligent Energy” idea, where these spirits could be the result of a person’s personality or will that is so strong that it’s able to encode itself onto the energy of what makes up its soul; and when the body dies, that soul carries on with that personality fairly in tact, one way or another. Doing the research on this book, I realized that certain bundles of energy attract each other and become supercharged, and we see that in nature all of the time. From the human side of things, we always talk about the “soulmate” idea, where you meet someone and there’s an immediate attraction there, and you just need to be around that person all the time. If that’s true in both examples, then why couldn’t it be a case of a person giving off a certain type of energy that attracts these things to them? I think that’s the case with me; I just think that maybe various spirits and whatnot are attracted to me because of who I am and because of the energy I give off.

The Weeklings: You also speak about metaphysics in the book. Do you allow for the possibility that by simply thinking about the supernatural, in positive or negative terms, you are putting an energy out there that attracts these experiences?

Corey Taylor: I think it’s part of it now, definitely. Over the last ten years, things have definitely grown a lot crazier around me, and I think that maybe the older I’ve gotten and the more set in my ways that I become, I’ve come to appreciate the things that I see a little more, so maybe that has opened me up to seeing different things or feeling different things. The crazy thing about being a free-minded individual is the fact that we’re always changing, so the energy is always changing; what you emboss onto that energy is always changing, so maybe because I’ve embraced the fact that these things happen, it’s attracted to me a little more and maybe it’s encouraged them to show themselves a little more.

The Weeklings: On its face, it’s interesting to have a musician talking about ghost stories, but you take a sharp left when you bring God into it. How do those concepts play against each other?

Corey Taylor: You know, that was one of the reasons that I wanted to write this book. I pride myself on being a pretty together atheist who uses common sense more than fascination, and yet here I was, a guy very dedicated to my belief that ghosts exist — just because of the things that I’ve seen — and like I said in the book, it comes down to knowing and believing. Maybe this is me being a little more self-assured or cocky than most people because I’m saying that I know ghosts exist because I’ve seen them, and I don’t believe that God exists because I’ve never seen God, but the biggest reason for writing this book was to figure things out for myself. I’m not trying to put out a pamphlet or start a cult or anything like that. I’m trying to figure these things out for myself and get some answers that might give me some peace when it comes to stuff like this. If people read it and relate to it, that’s just extra, but for me it was more about settling this argument in my own head and being able to come to terms with it.

Read the entire interview from The Weeklings.

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