Posts Tagged “Pioneers”


 Powered by Max Banner Ads 

DrugMetal.ru conducted an interview with reformed industrial metal pioneers GODFLESH prior to their August 24 concert at Moscow Hall in Moscow, Russia. You can now watch the chat below.

GODFLESH will release its first new recording in over 12 years through Decibel magazine’s Flexi Series in October. A cover of the track “F.O.D. (Fuck of Death)” by legendary death thrashers SLAUGHTER (Canada) will be included in the subscriber version of the magazine’s November issue (streeting October 5).

You can now stream the track at this location.

In a recent interview with the French radio station Le 106, GODFLESH‘s Justin Broadrick stated about the band’s forthcoming album — which is tentatively titled “A World Lit Only By Fire” and due in May 2014 — “It will be [musically] similar to the first two or three [GODFLESH albums]. I just think, like we’re playing these shows, we feel very pure about we’re doing and honoring the initial intentions with what we originally set out to do. Which, I think, like most bands and musicians and all the rest of it, by the time you get on to your fourth album, it’s somewhat of a dilution going on to what you initially tried to achieve. It will definitely sound aggressive and it probably won’t sound like any of the other records we’ve made, but it will have the minimalism of the first few records.”

Added GODFLESH bassist G.C. Green: “It won’t sound like the first two record; it will be more the spirit… When you make records over the years, you change as people, you change as musicians, you progress, you develop and you take other styles on, but I think, having had a break from it and come back to it, it seems that we’ve gone straight back into what the essence of it was originally, and that’s why it feels good.”

Continued Justin: “It’s getting straight back to the core of what this is all about. And I think having a break from it has probably even more inspired… It’s like refocusing and obviously, we’re somewhat older and wiser. It’s gonna be a really interesting record. It’s extremely minimal and very, very brutal — a fairly unforgiving record, really, I think.”

GODFLESH‘s seminal debut full-length album, 1989′s “Streetcleaner”, was remastered and reissued in a deluxe digipak in Europe on June 21, 2010 and in North America on August 10, 2010 via Earache Records.

“Streetcleaner” was GODFLESH‘s second release, proving to be one of the band’s finest and most recognized albums and helping them to become one of the most influential industrial bands ever. Now “Streetcleaner” was brought up to date as a special expanded version, with all tracks remastered by GODFLESH founding member Justin Broadrick. The album also includes a bonus disc featuring 12 previously unreleased live tracks, alternate mixes and demos, and comes housed in a deluxe multi-panel digipak with detailed liner notes.

godfleshmoscowposter2013

Comments No Comments »

Legendary Boston metal band WARGASM is commemorating the 25th anniversary of its debut album, “Why Play Around?”, by readying an album comprised of its mid-’80s demos for release before the end of this year. The 11 songs that are featured on the album were taken directly from the original cassettes, and the record will include every track from the band’s four demos: “Satan Stole My Lunch Money”, “Your Dog’s Teeth”, “Gasm It” and “Spirit In Decay”.

“Whoever owns the rights to ‘Why Play Around?’ will probably never re-release it,” says WARGASM bassist/vocalist Bob Mayo. “Half the songs on ‘Why Play Around?’ are on this demos album, so it’s a pretty cool way to celebrate the 25th anniversary.”

Now considered a thrash classic, “Why Play Around?” has been out of print for two decades, though original LP, cassette and CD versions of the album sell for hefty prices in the aftermarket.

Mayo continues: “We were amazed that the cassettes still sounded so great. We did have to do a little work on them because remixing them was out of the question. They don’t sound perfect, but they sound better now than they did on those original demo tapes.”

WARGASM‘s demos were traded extensively in the ’80s metal underground, and one of them, 1986′s legendary “Satan Stole My Lunch Money”, led to WARGASM‘s first record deal and the release of “Why Play Around?”.

“Working on this record definitely brought me back to those days,” says Mayo. “Thrash was just evolving and the tape-trading underground was a really powerful way to get your band heard all over the world. Those times were really special to us and so are these tapes. They’re part of the metal underground’s history and we’re psyched to be able to release them all together this way.”

WARGASM released three albums and one EP between 1985 and 1995.

wargasmsatanstole

wargasmdogs

Comments No Comments »

Maryland/DC based doom pioneers Iron Man have debuted a new song from their forthcoming effort, “South of the Earth.” Listen to “The Worst and Longest Day” now via The Obelisk at this location . “South of the Earth” will be released on October 1st via Metal Blade.

The post Iron Man Streaming New Song “The Worst And Longest Day” appeared first on Daily Heavy Metal News.

Comments No Comments »

Reformed industrial metal pioneers GODFLESH will release their first new recording in over 12 years through Decibel magazine’s Flexi Series in October. A cover of the track “F.O.D. (Fuck of Death)” by legendary death thrashers SLAUGHTER (Canada) will be included in the subscriber version of the magazine’s November issue (streeting October 5).

You can now stream the track at this location.

To obtain the GODFLESH flexi disc, subscribe to Decibel by 9 a.m. EST on September 3 to ensure its arrival. Anyone who currently has an active Decibel subscription will automatically receive the GODFLESH disc.

In a recent interview with the French radio station Le 106, GODFLESH‘s Justin Broadrick stated about the band’s forthcoming album — which is tentatively titled “A World Lit Only By Fire” and due in early 2014 — “It will be [musically] similar to the first two or three [GODFLESH albums]. I just think, like we’re playing these shows, we feel very pure about we’re doing and honoring the initial intentions with what we originally set out to do. Which, I think, like most bands and musicians and all the rest of it, by the time you get on to your fourth album, it’s somewhat of a dilution going on to what you initially tried to achieve. It will definitely sound aggressive and it probably won’t sound like any of the other records we’ve made, but it will have the minimalism of the first few records.”

Added GODFLESH bassist G.C. Green: “It won’t sound like the first two record; it will be more the spirit… When you make records over the years, you change as people, you change as musicians, you progress, you develop and you take other styles on, but I think, having had a break from it and come back to it, it seems that we’ve gone straight back into what the essence of it was originally, and that’s why it feels good.”

Continued Justin: “It’s getting straight back to the core of what this is all about. And I think having a break from it has probably even more inspired… It’s like refocusing and obviously, we’re somewhat older and wiser. It’s gonna be a really interesting record. It’s extremely minimal and very, very brutal — a fairly unforgiving record, really, I think.”

GODFLESH‘s seminal debut full-length album, 1989′s “Streetcleaner”, was remastered and reissued in a deluxe digipak in Europe on June 21, 2010 and in North America on August 10, 2010 via Earache Records.

“Streetcleaner” was GODFLESH‘s second release, proving to be one of the band’s finest and most recognized albums and helping them to become one of the most influential industrial bands ever. Now “Streetcleaner” was brought up to date as a special expanded version, with all tracks remastered by GODFLESH founding member Justin Broadrick. The album also includes a bonus disc featuring 12 previously unreleased live tracks, alternate mixes and demos, and comes housed in a deluxe multi-panel digipak with detailed liner notes.

godfleshflexi

godfleshlogo_638

Comments No Comments »

Joseph Schafer of Invisible Oranges recently conducted an interview with bassist/vocalist Jeff Walker of reactivated British extreme metal pioneers CARCASS. A couple of excerpts from the chat follow below.

Invisible Oranges: To me, “Surgical Steel” sounds at its heart to be a very sad record.

Walker: You think?

Invisible Oranges: I think so.

Walker: If anything, “Heartwork” and “Swansong” were, lyrically, very serious. This is a throwback to the old days of CARCASS, where it was very lighthearted. But this is cool because you’re extracting something from this album. Which is fine. I’m not here to dictate how people should perceive or enjoy this album. People who look at the lyrics and titles and think what the fuck they want are ultimately fragile and stupid. There’s no real agenda here, no real issues, nobody’s trying to brainwash anyone. I’m not Barney Greenway [NAPALM DEATH]. You can look at it at whatever level you like. You can view the lyrics as throwaway, or look very deep into it, and that’s fine. People keep asking me what the chorus is, the numbers on “The Dark Granulating Satanic Mills”, and I’m not going to say. I’ve heard some interesting theories as to what those numbers are about, and that is far more interesting than the reality.

Invisible Oranges: Would you describe to me the moment when you realized you were happy doing CARCASS again.

Walker: The first rehearsal. I was just happy to be playing with Bill [Steer, guitar] again. He’s a far superior musician to me, and a far superior human being as well. It was cool to be back where we started.

Invisible Oranges: It really seems like, retroactively, CARCASS is the relationship between you two.

Walker: Yes, you could argue that. If I hadn’t met Bill, Bill would have achieved musically, but I don’t think CARCASS would have existed, so in that sense you’re right. But the central songwriter of CARCASS has always been in flux. In the old days it was Ken [Owen, drums] who wrote a hell of a lot of the riffs. If you look at “Reek”, we had an equal three-way split. On “Symphonies”, Bill started doing more, and I did more of the lyrics. “Necroticism” is 95 percent Ken and Bill. Mike [Amott, guitar] came in at the end with one riff. “Heartwork” was all Bill and Mike‘s riffs. So as you can see the core of the band is constantly changing in terms of who’s writing the riffs. On “Surgical Steel”, it’s all Bill who’s coming up with the riffs. The more I think of it, you can’t really call the band mine and Bill‘s because in the past so much of it really was Ken. Ken cast a long shadow on this album, and his ghost is in the drumming, is in the lyrics and the songtitles. And he even tracked some backing vocals. He’s still there in spirit very much.

Invisible Oranges: That’s sort of poetic considering the way he is mixed into the record, his vocals are lower, so he almost literally is a ghost in the songs.

Walker: It’s important as far as credibility. If you look at the SLAYER situation, they’re going to have a hard ride now with no [Dave] Lombardo and the death of [Jeff] Hanneman. You could accuse the same thing of CARCASS — there’s no Ken, no Mike Amott. Especially from Mike‘s fanboys [we could hear those accusations]. Mike does deserve credit, but sometimes I think he’s extracted a little too much credit from CARCASS considering what he put in. Some people will hate this album on the basis of there being no Ken and no Mike Amott, so we’re very conscious of that, but we’re not stupid. We know what sounds good. We didn’t want something that would sound like “Swansong” when you compare it to “Heartwork” and “Necroticism”. We know what people want.

Read the entire interview at Invisible Oranges.

Comments No Comments »

U.S. progressive metal pioneers Fates Warning are soon to unleash their new studio album entitled “Darkness In A Different Light” on September 30th, 2013 in Europe and October 1st, 2013 in North America via InsideOutMusic

The post Fates Warning Streaming New Song “I Am” appeared first on Daily Heavy Metal News.

Comments No Comments »

In the October 2013 issue of Decibel magazine, bassist/vocalist Jeff Walker and guitarist Bill Steer of reactivated British extreme metal pioneers CARCASS spoke about the band’s split with guitarist Michael Amott and drummer Daniel Erlandsson, who had been touring with CARCASS since the group’s reunion was announced in 2007.

“In all honesty, once Michael had stepped out of CARCASS again, that’s when we could entertain the idea of doing the new record,” Steer revealed. “He’d made it very clear from the outset that he’d no interest or belief in there being a new CARCASS record. It’s really hard to tell if maybe he felt we were incapable of doing it, or if maybe he was just speaking out of loyalty to [his main band] ARCH ENEMY. I don’t know. But once the reunion shows were over, Michael basically said, ‘Look, I’m gonna be busy for a few years — you guys do whatever you’re gonna do. That meant Jeff and I could talk seriously about doing new material, because neither of us were being pulled in another direction like Michael was. CARCASS had become our main band and had priority treatment.”

When Amott split, Erlandsson followed. “It’s very much a package deal with those two because they’re in the same band, and they’ve invested so much in it,” Steer offered. “There’s no way that either Jeff or I could condemn them for doing that because ARCH ENEMY is their thing — especially for Michael. It’s a band that’s made its name from his direction — obviously his lady [ARCH ENEMY singer Angela Gossow] is involved, and until recently his brother was. So, it’s always gonna mean more to him than CARCASS, and we can understand that.”

“I wouldn’t expect any different, honestly,” Walker concurred. “ARCH ENEMY is Mike‘s band. So are SPIRITUAL BEGGARS. And CARCASS is our band. It just doesn’t mean as much to him as it does to me and Bill. We’ve been doing this since we were 17. The best way I can put it is this: Any band that Bill or I play with — whether it’s BRUJERIA, ANGEL WITCH or GENTLEMANS PISTOLS, CARCASS is our priority. With Mike, this would never be his priority.”

According to Walker, Amott changed his mind once he heard that Jeff and Bill were actively working on new material. “The reality is that Mike was very keen, more than anyone, for CARCASS to reunite,” Jeff said. “A few years later. he wasn’t keen for the reunion to continue, and he wasn’t keen on the idea of CARCASS doing a new album. This is despite the fact that he contacted me, after we were a year into the songwriting, because he heard we were doing a new album, and indicated that he wanted to be involved. I think Bill had an exchange with Mike about this and gave Mike an opportunity to put his cards on the table, [but] it became clear that Mike wasn’t really interested enough to walk away from any of the projects that he’s involved in . And don’t get me wrong — we’ve never expected that of anyone . But I think it could be fitted around each other’s projects. I still do BRUJERIA, you know?”

When Decibel contacted Amott via e-mail to ask why he didn’t participate in the new CARCASS album, he told the magazine, “Nothing happened, per se. In 2010, after two years of reunion shows and tours with CARCASS, I started working on a new ARCH ENEMY record and touring cycle. In the meantime, I guess Bill and Jeff started making new CARCASS music, which to me makes a lot of sense, actually. It’s what they should be doing. Anything else would be a terrible waste of talent and opportunity, in my opinion. I am very happy for them and the fans of the band. I’ve not heard any of the new music yet, but there is no doubt in my mind that they can still deliver.”

CARCASS‘ new album, “Surgical Steel”, will be released on September 16 in the U.K., September 13 in the rest of Europe and September 17 in North America via Nuclear Blast Records. The effort was produced by Colin Richardson (FEAR FACTORY, MACHINE HEAD, NAPALM DEATH, SLIPKNOT, BULLET FOR MY VALENTINE) and mixed by Andy Sneap (MEGADETH, ACCEPT, EXODUS, ARCH ENEMY).

carcassdecibelcover_600

Comments No Comments »

Sam Dunn of Banger Films Inc. spoke with bassist Shane Embury of British grincore pioneers NAPALM DEATH for the “lost” episode of the “Metal Evolution” series focusing on “Extreme Metal”. The episode will take viewers on an unprecedented journey across Europe and North America to tell the story of metal’s most aggressive and misunderstood sub-genre.

In the clip below, Embury defines the ever-popular blast beat.

After an enormously successful Indiegogo crowdfunding campaign raising nearly $40,000, Grammy-nominated and Juno-winning Banger Films is embarking on a final push to create the “Extreme Metal” episode.

“Our first Indiegogo campaign was a huge success and we were blown-away by the support of the metal community,” says Banger Films co-founder Sam Dunn. “The research, writing, travel and filming is now complete and we’ve captured some amazing interviews and footage. But we need to turn this footage into an episode!” The new campaign kicked off August 9. Details of the campaign, including a brand-new trailer featuring exclusive footage from Banger‘s “Extreme Metal” filming trip, can be found here.

Originally broadcast on VH1 Classic (USA) and Much More Music (Canada), Scot McFadyen and Sam Dunn‘s series “Metal Evolution” presented 11 episodes based on the Heavy Metal Family Tree originally shown in their groundbreaking documentary “Metal: A Headbanger’s Journey”. Host and metalhead-turned-anthropologist Dunn crisscrossed the globe exploring the vast history of heavy metal across its 40-plus year history, covering everything from the pre-history of metal and shock rock to grunge and thrash metal. But one very important episode was left out: “Extreme Metal”. “Some of the networks felt that extreme metal was too heavy or too niche. We’re out to prove that extreme metal is metal’s most vital sub-genre and that metal would probably die without it!,” says Dunn.

Tom Gabriel Warrior, legendary frontman for extreme metal bands HELLHAMMER, CELTIC FROST and TRIPTYKON, was interviewed by Dunn for the episode. “It was an absolute honor and a pleasure to host Sam and his outstanding team at my place in Zurich,” said Tom. “That extreme metal has been overlooked in this series so far is a scandal. This episode is utterly overdue!”

Bands appearing in the episode include VENOM, CELTIC FROST/HELLHAMMER, SLAYER, NAPALM DEATH, CARCASS, DEATH, MORBID ANGEL, OBITUARY, DARKTHRONE, MAYHEM, EMPEROR, DIMMU BORGIR, CRADLE OF FILTH, ENSLAVED, GOJIRA and more. The episode will also feature some renowned locations in the history of extreme metal, including Morrisound Studios in Tampa, Florida, as well as travel footage from Norway, Switzerland, U.K., U.S., and Hellfest (France), one of the world’s biggest metal festivals.

Contributors’ support for the new Indiegogo campaign will cover costs of finishing the episode which includes editing, archival and music licensing, onlining, sound mixing and other post-production costs.

“People are often surprised by how much making quality film and TV costs,” says Dunn. “It requires a lot of hard work from a team of talented people to ensure we make the best possible show. ‘Extreme Metal’ deserves the same high-production value and attention to detail that we gave the other ‘Metal Evolution’ episodes. I’m not getting paid to make this episode but what matters to me is that the ‘Metal Evolution’ series is finally completed!”

For more information, visit BangerFilms.com.

Comments No Comments »

David E. Gehlke of DeadRhetoric.com recently conducted an interview with bassist/vocalist Jeff Walker of reactivated British extreme-metal pioneers CARCASS. An excerpt from the second part of the chat follows below.

DeadRhetoric.com: The albatross over the [new CARCASS album, "Surgical Steeel"] album is [guitarist] Mike [Amott] not being involved. Had he been involved, do you think the album would be even more melodic than what it already is?

Walker: It’s very hypothetical, isn’t it? What do people think this melody is? Are they referring to the dual guitars on “Granulating Dark Satanic Mills”? That’s not melody in itself. If you go back even to “Reek”, there’s melody. There’s not twin-guitar harmonies, but it’s there. Do I think there would have been any more melody? I don’t know, but the reality is, Mike is not on the album. I think, credit where credit is due, Mike definitely brought something to “Necroticism” and “Heartwork”, but with all due respect, he’s got a lot of mileage and credit if we were to analyze the situation, some of it would be quite unfair to Bill [Steer, CARCASS guitarist]. Things are credited that are actually Bill‘s at the end of the day.

DeadRhetoric.com: Just reference some songs on “Swansong”, like “Child’s Play”. That’s melodic, and all Bill.

Walker: You can’t take away from what Mike contributed on the leads — it’s fantastic, and a breath of fresh air when juxtaposed to Bill‘s playing. But there are a lot of leads that are on “Heartwork” that people assume are Mike, but it’s Bill. There’s one moment on the new album on “Granulating Dark Satanic Mills” and Bill plays this lick and we’re like “Hmmmmm…” Even Bill was like, “Uh, okay.” Even after, when having a drink, he goes “Hang on, that’s like my lead from ‘Heartwork’.” I think a lot of people are downloading music and not reading the credits. Like I said — I didn’t want to take anything away from Mike Amott and his contributions to CARCASS, but I do think people have ran with it.

DeadRhetoric.com: He’s now a high-profile name, so that’s probably why.

Walker: He is, and he’s proven himself to be better than me and Bill when it comes to running with the ARCH ENEMY thing. People can think, “Look at Bill and Jeff — they’ve had no success when it comes to running a melodic death metal band,” so it’s understandable. If you’re asking what Mike could have brought, I’m not sure. How many albums has ARCH ENEMY done?

DeadRhetoric.com: I think they’re up to eight or nine.

Walker: Some people ask if I’m missing Mike‘s riff or leads, my response is “There’s eight fucking albums to go off of.” [laughs]

DeadRhetoric.com: Are you slowly working through the process with people in terms of what the reasons for him not being involved are? I think it’s clear now.

Walker: Not really. For example, we did some gigs in South America, [and] his name wasn’t mentioned once. These interviews, it depends on the people asking the questions know anything about the band, or they’re just Mike Amott fanboys. What’s annoying slightly, it’s hard to choose your words carefully, because no matter what you say, when it’s in black or white and in print, it can look nasty. There’s no real… problem either way. I’m happy with the album and I don’t think it’s missing Mike. I don’t think it would have benefited with him playing on it, and I don’t mean it bitterly. We did talk about getting another guitarist involved, but Bill never really showed any interest. Bill wanted to do this to prove he’s kind of the daddy when it comes to CARCASS. If we were very cynical, it would have been great to have Mike involved, never mind the fact the man sales-wise, has a large fanbase. The guy is practically a rock star in Japan, and that’s not an exaggeration. He’s a Marty Friedman character there, but it’s also important for us to set the history straight, you know?

Read the entire interview at DeadRhetoric.com.

Comments No Comments »

David E. Gehlke of DeadRhetoric.com recently conducted an interview with bassist/vocalist Jeff Walker of reactivated British extreme-metal pioneers CARCASS. A few excerpts from the chat follow below.

DeadRhetoric.com: With the new album ["Surgical Steel"], what was your “Hey, this is going to work” moment?

Walker: In the rehearsal room; it’s that simple. Bill [Steer, guitar] actually was like, “Okay, let’s try this out and if it works, great, if not, we haven’t lost anything.” My attitude was that it will work, like, “Don’t worry, Bill.” I have enough confidence in myself and him as a guitar player, and Daniel [Wilding] is a fantastic drummer and I was never under any illusion that we couldn’t pull something great off. I mean, we’re hungry and we have something to prove after 17 years and we don’t want to disappoint people. We don’t want to be one of these bands who come back after a long period of time with an album that people are like, “That album sucks!” We already made that album — it’s called “Swansong”. It’s important we don’t shit on our legacy. This is almost like making our first album. We’ve done this off our own volition, with our own time, and our own money. No one was dangling a carrot in front of us. We could have easily found a record deal, then made this album. But I think it was out of pride — especially from my side that it was more important we put our money where our mouth is. We kept it secret, and we didn’t want to be accused of doing it for the money.

DeadRhetoric.com: There’s no money in metal anyway.

Walker: I disagree. [laughs] Joking aside, it’s easy to deal with those kind of snipes, but I don’t want to give people ammunition.

DeadRhetoric.com: Is there any sort of pride in knowing how many bands have ripped off “Heartwork” and “Symphonies Of Sickness”, and you guys can come back and do it better than before?

Walker: Yeah, obviously there’s an element of bragging rights. But I don’t know… do we? Can we? It’s all in the eye of the beholder. There’s certain bands that are post-CARCASS that think we’re a bunch of old farts, that we’re not extreme, but we’re not trying to compete with anybody other than ourselves. We’re old school. This is an old-school album. We’re not trying to do whatever the fuck the kids are doing nowadays. And we’re not trying to compete with any bands that are influenced by CARCASS other than the fact we can do CARCASS better than them.

DeadRhetoric.com: Was it important for Dan to mirror the way Ken [Owen] played? He does some Ken Owen-type beats on the album, or at least plays in the manner Ken did. Was it important for him to stay in that vein?

Walker: I honestly don’t know because it’s not the result of any pressure from me and Bill. All I can say — and it wasn’t any real arm-twisting. In his previous bands, he was playing all the blast beats on two kick drums, which is kind of atypically modern. We call it the “Euro blast,” the “cheap beat,” which we trace back to Shane Embury from when he was in UNSEEN TERROR. With CARCASS and the bands we’ve been involved with — NAPALM DEATH, THE ELECTRO-HIPPIES, my old band — all the blast beats on the kick drum are post-punk rock. It comes from bands like SIEGE, D.R.I., etc. I might have commented about that, but to be honest, Bill was very laissez faire. It was important, but I never made a big deal about it. I didn’t put any pressure on Dan, but on his own volition, he started to play in this style and I asked why he was doing this, and he’s like, “Well, this is what suits CARCASS.” So maybe he has done his homework, but it’s not like Bill and I have kept on his back. If anything with Ken, Bill was always standing over his drum kit. With this, I said to Bill, “You don’t seem to be spending much time directing Dan.” If anything, I was that guy. [laughs] I don’t necessarily feel bad, but Dan‘s his own man. He’s done his homework and I want to read interviews where people are asking him what he’s done. The reality is in the studio, he could have easily overplayed because he’s an accomplished drummer, but he knows where he fits in the music. The next album we’ll let him overplay. [laughs]

Read the entire interview at DeadRhetoric.com.

“Captive Bolt Pistol” lyric video:



carcasssurgicalsteel3d

Comments No Comments »