Posts Tagged “Real World”

Ben Smith of VH1.com‘s Tuner recently conducted an interview with MEGADETH mainman Dave Mustaine. A couple of excerpts from the chat follow below.

VH1.com: Why do you think metal continually doesn’t get the respect it deserves?

Mustaine: You’ve got to look at a lot the participants in it. To their own demise, a lot of heavy metal performers act stupid. You know, “Hey bro, duh.” It doesn’t further our cause any. If you want to be treated intelligently, then act intelligent. I remember a lot of the opportunities that I’ve had to do coverage for different shows or stuff, with the whole political process. People forget that. You don’t have to be like, “Hey, F you, dude,” this kind of stuff to be cool. I think that rock ‘n’roll and heavy metal is about rebellion and if everyone thinks you’re stupid then rebel, be smart. A lot of the bands that were thrash and speed metal bands were anti-authoritarian, anti-establishment bands but there were also a lot that played heavy metal that were singing about mythology and taking it to the extreme with death and black metal bands. I have nothing against it. I just kind of think that’s where it started to spider web into all these different fragments of metal. Think about it, there are dozens and dozens of types of metal. To me, it’s all metal. It’s basically how you sing. The majority of these black and death metal bands have great players but people won’t take them seriously because of their lyrical content. I think if you want to appeal to the masses you have to talk about what’s happening in the real world or you have to address things that are happening emotionally with people that’s going on inside their own personal world. If not it’s like in “Purple Rain” when the guy looks at Prince and said, “The only person who understands your music is yourself.” That’s one of my favorite lines in any musical movie because you can very easily lose the plot.

VH1.com: Growing up in the ’80s and listening to the thrash metal and hardcore bands, when one of those bands got any sort of acknowledgment from the greater, more commercial, music world, it was such a big deal because those bands mattered so much to the fans. I don’t see that as much today. Do new bands still matter like the way they did back then?

Mustaine: I think the whole thing is there isn’t that culture of community. It’s not just the metal community. It’s people in general. People in general have a sense of entitlement right now like people owe them something. We’ve been on tour and had several incidents where there’s been bands that were nobodies and acted like they should be headlining over us, and it’s like, bless your heart, that’s a great attitude to take but you know, don’t shit the bed. It’s kind of weird sometimes how people, because of the digital audio work stations and how easy you can make a song on a computer, lose sight of that fact that that doesn’t make you a musician. It means you know how to cut and paste. And if you can write a song and you’re a great musician, that doesn’t necessarily mean you’ve got a great band. You can have 3 or 4 guys that play music and a musician and you can go and do stuff like these celebrities that have acting careers but are playing in a band with some schmoes. When you get into a band where there’s a bunch of musicians and a star, that’s when things start to happen. And if the surrounding members become stars themselves, it forces the leader to become more than that which is where you get into the elevation to superstar or legendary status. And the problems is everybody is so living in the moment with Instagram and tweeting and Facebook and everybody knows everything about everybody else. We’re profiling so much and it’s about our outsides. Because we compare our outsides to other people’s insides. And our insides to other people’s outsides. We’ll see somebody and think they’ve got it all going on but we don’t know what’s going on with them. You see some of these bands that think they’re entitled to this stuff, they want to be just like us. Well, you got to work for it. It’s called paying your dues. If you pay your dues and you deserve it people treat you with respect.

Read the entire interview at VH1.com.



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Guitarist/vocalist Doc Coyle of New Brunswick, New Jersey’s melodic, thrash-metal warriors GOD FORBID has posted the following message on his official blog:

“I am sorry to say that I am indeed leaving GOD FORBID.

“I started playing with these guys since I was 16 years old. Now I’m 32. You do the math.

“To say this is difficult and a big move for me would be an understatement. It has been very emotional and very sad for me to actually follow through with this, but I feel in my heart and head that it is the right thing to do.

“Let’s first remove the elephant from the room, and explain why I am leaving.

“I don’t want to leave the band, but there are elements of disorganization and unprofessionalism within the group that have made it impossible to be an effectively active band. I don’t feel like I’m being treated in a way that meets my standards, so I have to remove myself from the equation.

“I’m not going into great detail because I don’t want to throw anyone under the bus.

“I still love all the guys in GOD FORBID. They will always be my family, even if there isn’t a working band. But just because you love your family doesn’t mean you can work with them in a professional sense.

“Anyone who has read any of my blogs has probably heard me talk about trying to cope with confronting adulthood after living a musician’s life for my entire youth. I probably never, ever even entertained the idea of quitting GOD FORBID until my brother left in the spring of 2009. I always thought we were destined to ‘make it.’ I thought we were special. Nothing existed outside of the band. Nothing else mattered. Girlfriends, financial security, real world stuff would always take a back seat to the band. Even my girlfriends pretty much knew that.

“When Dallas quit, I became emboldened to carry on in spite of him. I wanted to prove that we didn’t need him. And carry on we did as GOD FORBID had three of the biggest tours we ever had all booked in a row with Kris Norris filling in on a massive tour with LAMB OF GOD, and then Matt Wicklund finally coming in to finish a festival run in Europe and then Mayhem fest in the states. I never really dealt with Dallas leaving on an emotional level, because we were steadily on the road. I was so angry with him. He was pretty much by my side for my entire life either on stage, binge-watching movies, drawing comics, playing basketball, playing guitar together or living in the bedroom next to mine in the same house. Then just like that… he was gone.

“Things began to unravel on the Mayhem fest 2009. The band was financially and logistically unprepared for the tour with very little label support, because we were at the end of our contract with Century Media despite the efforts of A&R at the time, the eager and helpful Ray Harkins. We ended up splitting with our manager at the beginning of the tour because of the shitstorm of unpreparedness. Plus I could just tell we weren’t connecting with fans the same way we had, say at Ozzfest five years prior. The tour featured a lot of death metal, BEHEMOTH, JOB FOR A COWBOY, THE BLACK DAHLIA MURDER. There just seemed to be a turning of the tide, and as an artist you have to be aware of how the world is perceiving you. For some reason, whatever we were doing was not breaking through to the populous the same way.

“Just to put a cherry on top, my girlfriend broke up with me literally on the drive home from the tour due to finding out about some fuckery on my behalf. It didn’t really hit me ’till I walked in my door at home, but I realized my brother was gone, my girl was gone, and my band career as a full-time thing was probably over. I fell into a deep depression because I didn’t have a leg to stand on and probably didn’t get back on track for another 7-8 months. For the first time in my adult life, though, I didn’t really care about GOD FORBID. At that point, the band seemed to be the cause of my problems.

“But playing with the guys, and writing with Matt Wicklund in particular, really inspired me and helped me get out of my funk. I continued with the ‘Equilibrium’ album out of loyalty to the guys, and I believe in finishing things I start, and that included doing some touring as well. All in all, I don’t regret it because I think it’s a fantastic album, if not our best album.

“Unfortunately, touring with the band last year proved to be unsustainable from a financial survival standpoint. I was homeless, in debt and needed to figure something out, because this lifestyle I was living was not working. The last few years are the first time in my life I’ve really thought about what I wanted to do outside of GOD FORBID.

“The answer is A LOT. I have so many ideas and prospective projects on the docket that I’m sure many of them will never see the light of the day.

“My priorities right now are having the time and freedom to be creative and productive. While still trying to keep the lights on, of course. This is both exciting and scary.

“I’m not sure if I will end up with a regular career that puts me in an office five days a week or end up in another band touring full-time again. I am just taking things as they come.

“I’m sure many of you have seen the reports regarding my new rock band and cover band, so I’m obviously continuing to play as much as possible. It’s still my favorite thing to do in the world, so I will not be stopping playing or performing anytime soon.

“Having this time recently to figure out what I want has made me realize that being a musician is who I am. Even if I end up doing other things, I will always be a rock ‘n’ roller at heart.

“I am keeping the door open to all forthcoming opportunities and I am not closing the door on GOD FORBID forever, but now is not the time.”

“Equilibrium”, sold 3,400 copies in the United States in its first week of release to debut at position No. 156 on The Billboard 200 chart. The effort landed at No. 7 on the Top New Artist Albums (Heatseekers) chart, which lists the best-selling albums by new and developing artists, defined as those who have never appeared in the Top 100 of The Billboard 200.

“Equilibrium” was released on March 27, 2012 via Victory Records. The bulk of the CD was recorded by Mark Lewis (THE BLACK DAHLIA MURDER, WHITECHAPEL, DEVILDRIVER, TRIVIUM), with Jason Suecof (TRIVIUM, ALL THAT REMAINS, THE BLACK DAHLIA MURDER, CHIMAIRA, DEVILDRIVER) stepping in during the the vocal-tracking stage. The effort was mixed by acclaimed Swedish producer Jens Bogren, who has previously worked with such acts as KATATONIA, OPETH, PARADISE LOST and AMON AMARTH.

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Writer Tom Brooks offers a practical, real-world approach to all the fundamental music concepts.

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Dutch female-fronted symphonic metallers DELAIN have posted behind-the-scenes footage from their appearance aboard 70000 Tons Of Metal, the world’s biggest heavy metal cruise, which sailed on January 28 from Miami, Florida and returned to the real world on February 1.

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Brazil’s “Stay Heavy” has posted a 30-minute video recap of Barge To Hell — the world’s most extreme metal cruise, which sailed Monday, December 3, 2012 from Miami, Florida to Nassau, Bahamas and returned to the real world on Friday, December 7.

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Brazilian metallers ANGRA tapped acclaimed Italian vocalist Fabio Lione (VISION DIVINE, RHAPSODY OF FIRE, KAMELOT) to front the band for their appearance aboard 70000 Tons Of Metal, the world’s biggest heavy metal cruise, which sailed on January 28 from Miami, Florida and returned to the real world on February 1.

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Brazilian metallers ANGRA tapped acclaimed Italian vocalist Fabio Lione (VISION DIVINE, RHAPSODY OF FIRE, KAMELOT) to front the band for their appearance aboard 70000 Tons Of Metal, the world’s biggest heavy metal cruise, which sailed on January 28 from Miami, Florida and returned to the real world on February 1.

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Metal-Rules.com conducted an interview with drummer Daniel Löble of German power metallers HELLOWEEN aboard 70000 Tons Of Metal, the world’s biggest heavy metal cruise, which sailed on January 28 from Miami, Florida and returned to the real world on February 1.

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Metal-Rules.com conducted an interview with guitarist/vocalist Mille Petrozza of German thrash metal veterans KREATOR aboard 70000 Tons Of Metal, the world’s biggest heavy metal cruise, which sailed on January 28 from Miami, Florida and returned to the real world on February 1.

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Metal-Rules.com conducted an interview with Phoenix, Arizona-based metal veterans FLOTSAM AND JETSAM aboard 70000 Tons Of Metal, the world’s biggest heavy metal cruise, which sailed on January 28 from Miami, Florida and returned to the real world on February 1.

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