Posts Tagged “Reference Points”

“Fire On The Mountain”, the debut album from the heavy metal “supergroup” TWILIGHT OF THE GODS, is available for streaming in its entirety using the SoundCloud widget below. The CD will be released on September 27 in Europe and October 1 in North America via Season Of Mist.

TWILIGHT OF THE GODS is: Alan Averill (PRIMORDIAL, DEAD SOVEREIGN, BLOOD REVOLT) on vocals, Nick Barker (ex-CRADLE OF FILTH, ex-DIMMU BORGIR, ex-TESTAMENT, ex-EXODUS) on drums, guitarists Rune Eriksen (AURA NOIR, ex-AVA INFERI, ex-MAYHEM) and Patrik Lindgren (THYRFING), and Frode Glesnes (EINHERJER) on bass.

“Fire On The Mountain” track listing:

01. Destiny Forged In Blood
02. Children Of Cain
03. Fire On The Mountain (1683)
04. Preacher Man
05. Sword Of Damocles
06. The End Of History
07. At Dawn We Ride

The effort will be made available as a CD digipack and a limited-edition LP via the Season Of Mist e-shop.

In a recent interview with Metal Hammer magazine, Averill stated about “Fire On The Mountain”: “We grew up with and through most of our reference points. This is just what just came out when we play. We didn’t need to go, ‘We need to write songs that sound like MANOWAR,’ but we all love MANOWAR. There’s a fine line to walk between pastiche, parody and putting of the old gonzoid heavy metal charm into it, but not being too self-knowing in that sense.”

Asked if it was weird to switch over to singing classic metal lyrics, and finding out how he related to those lyrics, Averill said: “Definitely. The thing is that it’s full of the gonzoid heavy metal idioms — the swords and the steel and the blood and the fire. It was a difficult balance to find, to strike between being full of a certain glory and beauty and charm of old heavy metal, without it being too wink-wink, nod-nod, self-parody, but really genuinely meaning it because that’s what we all love, and treating it with the sort of kid gloves and respect that it deserves.”

He continued: “But yeah, it was difficult trying to find a different voice, another kind of lyric but at the same time, if you take, say, the title track, ‘Fire On The Mountain’, that’s my Dio tribute and it sounds like a RAINBOW songtitle. But yeah, the song is about the siege of Vienna by the Ottoman empire in 1683 where King Leopold I and the Holy Roman See defeated the Turks, and those, I think, had a lot to do with saving the European culture and the Enlightenment and all sorts of stuff. So if you were to actually look at it, you’d go, ‘Actually, there’s something being said here, but it’s written in heavy metal vernacular, which was handed down to us from IRON MAIDEN and whoever. But it’s a challenge, for sure, and it’s also a challenge to write a chorus that people could sing. You’re sitting there for the first time thinking, actually, how could I write this in such a way for people at a show or at a festival to get behind it, you know? It’s just a traditional, hard-rock structure, which is a breath of fresh air for all of us, because we’ve all, for the past 20 years, been playing extreme music and darker music to some degree, so it’s a bit like something fresh for all of us, despite the fact that it’s all old.”

Photo credit (above): Steinar Sortland

twilightgodsfire

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The lyric video for the song “Children Of Cain” from the heavy metal “supergroup” TWILIGHT OF THE GODS can be seen below. The track comes off the band’s debut album, “Fire On The Mountain”, which will be released on September 27 in Europe and October 1 in North America via Season Of Mist.

TWILIGHT OF THE GODS is: Alan Averill (PRIMORDIAL, DEAD SOVEREIGN, BLOOD REVOLT) on vocals, Nick Barker (ex-CRADLE OF FILTH, ex-DIMMU BORGIR, ex-TESTAMENT, ex-EXODUS) on drums, guitarists Rune Eriksen (AURA NOIR, ex-AVA INFERI, ex-MAYHEM) and Patrik Lindgren (THYRFING), and Frode Glesnes (EINHERJER) on bass.

“Fire On The Mountain” track listing:

01. Destiny Forged In Blood
02. Children Of Cain
03. Fire On The Mountain (1683)
04. Preacher Man
05. Sword Of Damocles
06. The End Of History
07. At Dawn We Ride

The effort will be made available as a CD digipack and a limited-edition LP via the Season Of Mist e-shop.

In a recent interview with Metal Hammer magazine, Averill stated about “Fire On The Mountain”: “We grew up with and through most of our reference points. This is just what just came out when we play. We didn’t need to go, ‘We need to write songs that sound like MANOWAR,’ but we all love MANOWAR. There’s a fine line to walk between pastiche, parody and putting of the old gonzoid heavy metal charm into it, but not being too self-knowing in that sense.”

Asked if it was weird to switch over to singing classic metal lyrics, and finding out how he related to those lyrics, Averill said: “Definitely. The thing is that it’s full of the gonzoid heavy metal idioms — the swords and the steel and the blood and the fire. It was a difficult balance to find, to strike between being full of a certain glory and beauty and charm of old heavy metal, without it being too wink-wink, nod-nod, self-parody, but really genuinely meaning it because that’s what we all love, and treating it with the sort of kid gloves and respect that it deserves.”

He continued: “But yeah, it was difficult trying to find a different voice, another kind of lyric but at the same time, if you take, say, the title track, ‘Fire On The Mountain’, that’s my Dio tribute and it sounds like a RAINBOW songtitle. But yeah, the song is about the siege of Vienna by the Ottoman empire in 1683 where King Leopold I and the Holy Roman See defeated the Turks, and those, I think, had a lot to do with saving the European culture and the Enlightenment and all sorts of stuff. So if you were to actually look at it, you’d go, ‘Actually, there’s something being said here, but it’s written in heavy metal vernacular, which was handed down to us from IRON MAIDEN and whoever. But it’s a challenge, for sure, and it’s also a challenge to write a chorus that people could sing. You’re sitting there for the first time thinking, actually, how could I write this in such a way for people at a show or at a festival to get behind it, you know? It’s just a traditional, hard-rock structure, which is a breath of fresh air for all of us, because we’ve all, for the past 20 years, been playing extreme music and darker music to some degree, so it’s a bit like something fresh for all of us, despite the fact that it’s all old.”

Photo credit (above): Steinar Sortland

twilightgodsfire

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“Destiny Forged In Blood”, a new song from the heavy metal “supergroup” TWILIGHT OF THE GODS, can be streamed below (courtesy of Decibel magazine). The track comes off the band’s debut album, “Fire On The Mountain”, which will be released on September 27 in Europe and October 1 in North America via Season Of Mist.

TWILIGHT OF THE GODS is: Alan Averill (PRIMORDIAL, DEAD SOVEREIGN, BLOOD REVOLT) on vocals, Nick Barker (ex-CRADLE OF FILTH, ex-DIMMU BORGIR, ex-TESTAMENT, ex-EXODUS) on drums, guitarists Rune Eriksen (AURA NOIR, ex-AVA INFERI, ex-MAYHEM) and Patrik Lindgren (THYRFING), and Frode Glesnes (EINHERJER) on bass.

“Fire On The Mountain” track listing:

01. Destiny Forged In Blood
02. Children Of Cain
03. Fire On The Mountain (1683)
04. Preacher Man
05. Sword Of Damocles
06. The End Of History
07. At Dawn We Ride

The effort will be made available as a CD digipack and a limited-edition LP via the Season Of Mist e-shop.

In a recent interview with Metal Hammer magazine, Averill stated about “Fire On The Mountain”: “We grew up with and through most of our reference points. This is just what just came out when we play. We didn’t need to go, ‘We need to write songs that sound like MANOWAR,’ but we all love MANOWAR. There’s a fine line to walk between pastiche, parody and putting of the old gonzoid heavy metal charm into it, but not being too self-knowing in that sense.”

Asked if it was weird to switch over to singing classic metal lyrics, and finding out how he related to those lyrics, Averill said: “Definitely. The thing is that it’s full of the gonzoid heavy metal idioms — the swords and the steel and the blood and the fire. It was a difficult balance to find, to strike between being full of a certain glory and beauty and charm of old heavy metal, without it being too wink-wink, nod-nod, self-parody, but really genuinely meaning it because that’s what we all love, and treating it with the sort of kid gloves and respect that it deserves.”

He continued: “But yeah, it was difficult trying to find a different voice, another kind of lyric but at the same time, if you take, say, the title track, ‘Fire On The Mountain’, that’s my Dio tribute and it sounds like a RAINBOW songtitle. But yeah, the song is about the siege of Vienna by the Ottoman empire in 1683 where King Leopold I and the Holy Roman See defeated the Turks, and those, I think, had a lot to do with saving the European culture and the Enlightenment and all sorts of stuff. So if you were to actually look at it, you’d go, ‘Actually, there’s something being said here, but it’s written in heavy metal vernacular, which was handed down to us from IRON MAIDEN and whoever. But it’s a challenge, for sure, and it’s also a challenge to write a chorus that people could sing. You’re sitting there for the first time thinking, actually, how could I write this in such a way for people at a show or at a festival to get behind it, you know? It’s just a traditional, hard-rock structure, which is a breath of fresh air for all of us, because we’ve all, for the past 20 years, been playing extreme music and darker music to some degree, so it’s a bit like something fresh for all of us, despite the fact that it’s all old.”




Photo credit (above): Steinar Sortland

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Twilight Of The Gods

Twilight Of The Gods, the extreme metal supergroup featuring Primordial’s Alan Nemtheanga, Mayhem’s Blasphemer, ex-Cradle/Dimmu drummer Nick Barker and members of Thyrfing and Einherjer, are putting the final touches to their debut album, Fire On The Mountain, which is due to be released in February or March next year via Season Of Mist. Subterranea got an early listen, and in the first of a two-part interview we chat with Alan about going back to the past, siege mentalities and the joys of being obvious.

This new album is going back to the old school, but it doesn’t sound kitsch. Some bands can sound too knowing and Fire On The Mountain finds a good balance between knowing your marker points and being progressive at the same time.

“Yeah. I guess the thing is that we’re a bit older. We grew up with and through most of our reference points. This is just what just came out when we play, we didn’t need to go, ‘We need to write songs that sound like Manowar’, but we all love Manowar. There’s a fine line to walk between pastiche, parody and putting of the old gonzoid heavy metal charm into it, but not being too self-knowing in that sense.”

Was it weird to switch over to singing classic metal lyrics, and finding out how you relate to those lyrics?

“Definitely, the thing is that it’s full of the gonzoid heavy metal idioms – the swords and the steel and the blood and the fire. It was a difficult balance to find, to strike between being full of a certain glory and beauty and charm of old heavy metal, without it being too wink-wink, nod-nod, self-parody, but really genuinely meaning it because that’s what we all love, and treating it with the sort of kid gloves and respect that it deserves.

“But yeah, it was difficult trying to find a different voice, another kind of lyric but at the same time, if you take, say, the title track Fire On The Mountain, that’s my Dio tribute and it sounds like a Rainbow song title. But yeah, the song is about the siege of Vienna by the Ottoman empire in 1683 where King Leopold I and the Holy Roman See defeated the Turks, and those, I think, had a lot to do with saving the European culture and the Enlightenment and all sorts of stuff. So if you were to actually look at it, you’d go ‘Actually there’s something being said here, but it’s written in heavy metal vernacular, which was handed down to us from Iron Maiden and whoever. But it’s a challenge for sure, and it’s also a challenge to write a chorus that people could sing. You’re sitting there for the first time thinking, actually how could I write this in such a way for people at a show or at a festival to get behind it, you know? It’s just a traditional, hard rock structure, which is a breath of fresh air for all of us, because we’ve all, for the past 20 years, been playing extreme music and darker music to some degree, so it’s a bit like something fresh for all of us, despite the fact that it’s all old.

Is it difficult to write simple lyrics?

“It is. It’s only when you try to write a simplistic lyric, which has the onomatopoeia, which has the rhythm, as the rhyme, has the meter and you have to make it fit into the timing and the framing of the riff. This is something I don’t have to do in Primordial because it drifts along and you sing over that, and you do move with the structures, but this is a much more disciplined thing and it’s only when you start to listen to something like Judas Priest, when you listen to Rapid Fire or Grinder or something where you’ve got the vocal moving against the rhythm of the music and yet meeting it. So, yeah, there are some very clever disciplines because we have had no structures like that in our other bands. It’s all a heavy metal/hard rock discipline that we weren’t used to. It was very challenging to be honest and again trying to put some meaning onto the music.”

I guess it’s that mix of journey of discovery and what’s been internalised.

“Yeah, you’ve been living this for 20, 25 years so you should be able to know when the key change comes in. We should all feel it and go, ‘Hey, maybe we need to go to F sharp from C’, or whatever, and then you go, ‘Is that too Maiden? It doesn’t matter’.”

It’s liberating to know that you can be obvious?

“Sometimes because if you listen to Primordial what you listen to Rune’s work with Ordo Ad Chao, it’s not obvious stuff what we’ve all been trying to do. Maybe Einherjer is close to his heavy metal straight

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Bevar Sea has issued the following statement about the band’s upcoming self-titled, debut album:

“2011 was a good year for Bevar Sea, with several gigs in the bag and great response from the local audience to their take on slow and heavy music. 2012 threatens to up the ante, with the impending release of the self-titled debut album, featuring the best-known songs from their live set. Track list:

1. Universal Sleeper
2. Abishtu
3. The Smiler
4. Mono Gnome

“We’ve had a great time performing these songs since we made our stage debut. After a year of playing them out and getting better, we thought it was the right time to hit the studio and put out our first album. On the one hand, it’s been a challenge to capture the live vibe on the recordings, and on the other, being in the studio and listening to the songs over and over has allowed us to fine-tune the arrangements. One of our favourite engineers/producers is going to be mixing this, so this is going to be a mindblowing experience for us.”

The self-titled album has been penned for an early summer 2012 release via the recently formed Iron Fist Records in India. CDs and digital downloads will be the first available media, with more formats coming later. The CD will come in a 6 panel digipack, including a 12 page booklet, with extensive illustrations across the layout.

According to Rahul Chacko, lead guitarist and in-house band artist: “The art for Bevar Sea has always been about trying to portray the spirit of the music, while using reference points from the lyrics, and incorporating a healthy dose of influence from some of our favourite comic artists. The album art is probably our most ambitious collection yet, and so far it’s shaping up pretty good!”

The band will wrap up recording, and support label-mates, scene veterans, and fellow old schoolers Kryptos for the band’s third album launch party on February 18th at Kyra Theatre in Bangalore. This occasion will also see the launch of Bevar Sea’s new website, and the debut of the new song, “Where There’s Smoke (There’s A Pyre).”

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HeXen: May the Thrash Be With You
By Scott Alisoglu

“Basically, I think it was around the beginning of this decade when a whole generation of kids our age started looking back into the metal because everywhere was just BS music.” The words from HeXen vocalist/bassist Andre Harroonian are familiar ones. This year in particular it has become blatantly apparent that a new generation has looked to thrash metal’s glorious past for inspiration. The market may be on the verge of flooding, but if the waters cleanse the streets of prefabricated, soulless metal, then so much the better.

“You’d hear it on the radio and on TV,” Harroonian continues, “and basically America just became so saturated with all these corporate, mainstream bands, the pop bands and the rap bands. Here there was always an underground and metal never died, but I just got so sick of all the Limp Bizkits and Korns and all those things. So we basically looked backwards trying to find good music in metal. We all got interested in it together in middle school and high school.”

After forming in 2003, the teenager thrashers of HeXen began furiously writing and releasing demos, ultimately landing a deal with, appropriately enough, Old School Metal Records early this year. The quartet’s [also including drummer Carlos Cruz and guitarists Ronny Dorian and James Lopez] full-length debut, State of Insurgency, is a 56-minute tour de force of sharply arranged, up-tempo thrash metal with strong melodies, sociopolitical lyrics, and one hell of a lot of shred. Owing as much to early Megadeth and Testament as the more common reference points of many of today’s cherubic bullet-belters (Exodus, Kreator, second-wave thrash, etc), HeXen strove to up the ante in composing its music.

“In the end, our core is still thrash,” assures Harroonian. “We could sit down and write simple, two power-chord riff thrash songs, but we aren’t fulfilled in the end doing that kind of stuff. No matter what happens, we always end up spicing it up, throwing in melodies and harmonies, and the lyrics have to be more serious than what a lot of thrash bands tend to write about. Especially when it comes to the arrangements I think what we have in some of our songs more than any other thrash band is a lot of overdubs, really making the music polyphonic, and orchestrating sometimes, especially in the title track. Most of the time some thrash bands are just no-bullshit and bare bones with two rhythm tracks and a solo track on top and that’s basically your song. We like to go in and lay on a lot of tracks and really make the music sick and have a lot of stuff in the background, sometimes keyboards, sometimes acoustics, and produce a big product. That’s why our debut album is 13 tracks long.”

Reading that description, one might assume that State of Insurgency is a bloated mess that would never translate in a live setting. That’s certainly not the case, as Harroonian affirms.

“If someone really listens and analyzes the music and comes out to a live show, he might feel like some stuff, like a little counter melody or harmony that made things sound sexy on the CD, is not there. Obviously, we only have two guitars to play that live. We’re not a studio band that tries to do a million different things though, so that if people come out to see us live we don’t suffer from the same thing that a lot of three-pieces or Pantera suffer from; when it cuts to solos and whatnot the rhythm cuts out and you only have this bass to hold up the bottom end.”

In further demonstration of the seriousness with which the members of HeXen take their metal, Harroonian goes to great lengths to write lyrics with depth. The young man’s intelligence comes across in a big way and his left-wing political commentary on the state of the nation is damning, to say the least.

“I figure if I don’t have the most talent in my voice, just screaming Tom Araya-esque thrash vocals, I might as well make the lyrics worthwhile. I spent a lot of time with them. At times it will take me weeks to finish off the lyrics for a song. They say that two things that people should never really discuss because they are endless debates are religion and politics. But I think they say that because those two things mainly rule the world. We have such vast problems and worldwide events in front of our eyes. I find it extremely irrelevant and insignificant to be singing about stuff like death, darkness, Satan, and fear, like a lot of thrash bands. I draw inspiration from a lot of documentaries that I watch. A couple that inspired me for some of the lyrics that I wrote were the movies Zeitgeist, Taxi to the Dark Side, and The Esoteric Agenda, which is great eye opening stuff. I don’t want to sound like a traitor or anything. I just give you the most negative outlook on all of America’s endeavors.”

Copyright 2009 Scott Alisoglu

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