Posts Tagged “Rehearsal”

The fifth installment in Relapse’s exhaustive reissue campaign of DEATH‘s immensely influential catalog is “Leprosy”, the band’s titanic second album. Originally released in 1988 the pioneering LP built upon the thrash sounds of METALLICA and SLAYER but added a previously unheard level of raw extremity. These songs are the roots of an entire genre: death metal. While this was only the second record DEATH released, it immediately cemented them as heavy metal icons.

The “Leprosy” reissue will be made available on April 25 in Benelux, Germany, Finland; April 29 in North America and April 28 in the the rest of the world. The entire album, as well as the bonus material, has been painstakingly remastered by Alan Douches (MASTODON, NILE) and will be reissued in the following format:

* 2xCD/Limited Edition
* 3xCD/LP/Picture Disc LP/Limited Edition
* 2xLP Box set/Digtal

The Deluxe 2xCD contains 50 minutes of previously unheard and unreleased “Leprosy” demos and rehearsal material housed in an embossed o-card package with a 24-page booklet featuring unseen pictures of the band as well as brand new liner notes from Ian Christe (SiriusXM) and Jeremy Wagner (BROKEN HOPE). The LP features the remastered core album on wax together with a download card for all of the music included on the 2xCD.

A remastered version of the death metal classic “Pull The Plug” can be heard below.

In addition to the 2xCD reissue, a super limited 3xCD version will be available exclusively from www.relapse.com featuring everything included on 2xCD version plus an exclusive third CD featuring over 40 minutes of unreleased live material, housed in a deluxe embossed eight-panel digipak with a 24-page booklet, limited and numbered to 2000 copies.

Finally, a super-limited deluxe vinyl box set (limited to 500 copies) will be available exclusively from www.relapse.com containing: the remastered core “Leprosy” album on exclusive colored vinyl; a second LP containing unreleased rehearsal material from the “Leprosy” sessions housed in an exclusive jacket with original flyer art on exclusive colored vinyl; an exact replication of the original Combat newspaper print LP insert, a “Leprosy” turntable slipmat, and a download card of all three discs.

Pre-orders, including an exclusive new line of official DEATH merch, are available here.

Digital pre-orders are available via Bandcamp here.

Disc 1

01. Leprosy
02. Born Dead
03. Forgotten Past
04. Left To Die
05. Pull The Plug
06. Open Casket
07. Primitive Ways
08. Choke On It

Disc 2

Leprosy – 9/23/87 Rehearsal

01. Open Casket
02. Choke On It
03. Left To Die
04. Left To Die – Take 2

Leprosy – 12/05/87 Rehearsals

05. Left To Die
06. Open Casket
07. Pull The Plug
08. Choke On It
09. Born Dead
10. Forgotten Past

Disc 3

Live at Backstreets, Rochester, NY – December 13th, 1988

01. Leprosy
02. Open Casket
03. Zombie Ritual
04. Pull The Plug
05. Left To Die
06. Mutilation
07. Forgotten Past
08. Born Dead
09. Denial Of Life
10. Primitive Ways
11. Infernal Death

Live at The Dirt Club, Bloomfield, NJ – December 11, 1988

12. Leprosy
13. Pull The Plug
14. Forgotten Past
15. Primitive Ways

Digital Deluxe ONLY Bonus Tracks – Live at The Dirt Club, Bloomfield, NJ – December 11, 1988

16. Open Casket
17. Mutilation
18. Infernal Death

deathleprosyreissue

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Joseph Schafer of Invisible Oranges recently conducted an interview with bassist/vocalist Jeff Walker of reactivated British extreme metal pioneers CARCASS. A couple of excerpts from the chat follow below.

Invisible Oranges: To me, “Surgical Steel” sounds at its heart to be a very sad record.

Walker: You think?

Invisible Oranges: I think so.

Walker: If anything, “Heartwork” and “Swansong” were, lyrically, very serious. This is a throwback to the old days of CARCASS, where it was very lighthearted. But this is cool because you’re extracting something from this album. Which is fine. I’m not here to dictate how people should perceive or enjoy this album. People who look at the lyrics and titles and think what the fuck they want are ultimately fragile and stupid. There’s no real agenda here, no real issues, nobody’s trying to brainwash anyone. I’m not Barney Greenway [NAPALM DEATH]. You can look at it at whatever level you like. You can view the lyrics as throwaway, or look very deep into it, and that’s fine. People keep asking me what the chorus is, the numbers on “The Dark Granulating Satanic Mills”, and I’m not going to say. I’ve heard some interesting theories as to what those numbers are about, and that is far more interesting than the reality.

Invisible Oranges: Would you describe to me the moment when you realized you were happy doing CARCASS again.

Walker: The first rehearsal. I was just happy to be playing with Bill [Steer, guitar] again. He’s a far superior musician to me, and a far superior human being as well. It was cool to be back where we started.

Invisible Oranges: It really seems like, retroactively, CARCASS is the relationship between you two.

Walker: Yes, you could argue that. If I hadn’t met Bill, Bill would have achieved musically, but I don’t think CARCASS would have existed, so in that sense you’re right. But the central songwriter of CARCASS has always been in flux. In the old days it was Ken [Owen, drums] who wrote a hell of a lot of the riffs. If you look at “Reek”, we had an equal three-way split. On “Symphonies”, Bill started doing more, and I did more of the lyrics. “Necroticism” is 95 percent Ken and Bill. Mike [Amott, guitar] came in at the end with one riff. “Heartwork” was all Bill and Mike‘s riffs. So as you can see the core of the band is constantly changing in terms of who’s writing the riffs. On “Surgical Steel”, it’s all Bill who’s coming up with the riffs. The more I think of it, you can’t really call the band mine and Bill‘s because in the past so much of it really was Ken. Ken cast a long shadow on this album, and his ghost is in the drumming, is in the lyrics and the songtitles. And he even tracked some backing vocals. He’s still there in spirit very much.

Invisible Oranges: That’s sort of poetic considering the way he is mixed into the record, his vocals are lower, so he almost literally is a ghost in the songs.

Walker: It’s important as far as credibility. If you look at the SLAYER situation, they’re going to have a hard ride now with no [Dave] Lombardo and the death of [Jeff] Hanneman. You could accuse the same thing of CARCASS — there’s no Ken, no Mike Amott. Especially from Mike‘s fanboys [we could hear those accusations]. Mike does deserve credit, but sometimes I think he’s extracted a little too much credit from CARCASS considering what he put in. Some people will hate this album on the basis of there being no Ken and no Mike Amott, so we’re very conscious of that, but we’re not stupid. We know what sounds good. We didn’t want something that would sound like “Swansong” when you compare it to “Heartwork” and “Necroticism”. We know what people want.

Read the entire interview at Invisible Oranges.

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Singer posts 1994 Headbanger’s Ball interview in response to denials.

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Former SKID ROW singer Sebastian Bach joined SIN CITY SINNERS on stage this past Saturday, September 14 at Count’s Vamp’d Rock Bar & Grill in Las Vegas, Nevada to perform a number of classic rock tracks, including MÖTLEY CRÜE‘s “Live Wire”. Fan-filmed video footage of his appearance can be seen below.

After Bach revealed in a a three-word tweet to a fan on August 29 that he was asked to join MÖTLEY CRÜE more than two decades ago, CRÜE bassist Nikki Sixx quickly retorted that Bach‘s version of events never happened. Sebastian then took to his Facebook page to describe in some detail the circumstances behind his being asked to join the CRÜE, which included taking part in a full day’s rehearsal with the band and a slew of phone calls between various managers, agents and label executives. “I was driven to rehearsal by Tommy Lee, and I spent a full day singing the MÖTLEY CRÜE set with the band MÖTLEY CRÜE,” Bach wrote. “I remember the songs that Nikki asked me to sing that day. I remember the whole road crew’s ecstatic reaction to us jamming together all day. And I remember Nikki‘s very generous, kind offer, at the end of our rehearsal, for me to join the band MÖTLEY CRÜE. I remember his exact words that he said to me in front of his whole road crew, Tommy and Mick [Mars] as well. It’s not every day that your hero asks you to join his band.”

Bach didn’t reveal the full details of what went down that day, promising his Facebook followers that he “will tell the complete story of Nikki offering me to join MÖTLEY CRÜE in my upcoming book, which will be arriving on bookshelves soon.”

He added: “I am not simply ‘making this up’… I am not a liar. I am working on my book right now and I look forward to you all reading it. I plan on my book having even more information in it than one of my tweets does.”

On Friday (September 13), Nikki tweeted what appeared to be a short response to Bach‘s online rant: “Someone needs attention to try and sell some books.” He then added: “I always liked the term ‘washed up.'”

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bachsincitysinnerssept2013

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MÖTLEY CRÜE bassist Nikki Sixx has apparently dismissed former SKID ROW singer Sebastian Bach‘s latest online missive as a ploy to get “attention to sell some books.”

After Bach revealed in a a three-word tweet to a fan that he was asked to join MÖTLEY CRÜE more than two decades ago, Sixx quickly retorted that Bach‘s version of events never happened. Sebastian then took to his Facebook page to describe in some detail the circumstances behind his being asked to join the CRÜE, which included taking part in a full day’s rehearsal with the band and a slew of phone calls between various managers, agents and label executives. “I was driven to rehearsal by Tommy Lee, and I spent a full day singing the MÖTLEY CRÜE set with the band MÖTLEY CRÜE,” Bach wrote. “I remember the songs that Nikki asked me to sing that day. I remember the whole road crew’s ecstatic reaction to us jamming together all day. And I remember Nikki‘s very generous, kind offer, at the end of our rehearsal, for me to join the band MÖTLEY CRÜE. I remember his exact words that he said to me in front of his whole road crew, Tommy and Mick [Mars] as well. It’s not every day that your hero asks you to join his band.”

Bach didn’t reveal the complete details of what went down that day, promising his Facebook followers that he “will tell the complete story of Nikki offering me to join MÖTLEY CRÜE in my upcoming book, which will be arriving on bookshelves soon.”

He added: “I am not simply ‘making this up’… I am not a liar. I am working on my book right now and I look forward to you all reading it. I plan on my book having even more information in it than one of my tweets does.”

Earlier today, Nikki tweeted what appeared to be a short response to Bach‘s online rant: “Someone needs attention to try and sell some books.”

sixxattentionbooks

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CrypticRock.com recently conducted an interview with vocalist Ville Valo of Finnish love metallers HIM. A couple of excerpts from the chat follow below.

CrypticRock.com: HIM is now internationally known and your logo branded all over. “Dark Light” [2005] was the height of the band’s success in the USA. The album went gold in various markets. Riding high from that success, you guys have released three albums since then. Was your approach to the music different at all after the success of “Dark Light”?

Ville Valo: Not really. It would be better to ask did our approach changed before “Dark Light”. I think that, usually, with any band that has any success, they don’t know why they have success. Bands, in general, work hard and you should do what you feel is the best, go with the flow, and trust your instincts. That is basically what we did with “Dark Light”. It paid off, and that’s basically what we continue doing. Obviously, the whole world of music keeps on changing. You meet your new favorite band every day of the week. We haven’t been getting much radio air play after that, for example, in the States. Still, we’ve been touring successfully, and still there seems to be a lot of people that enjoy what we do and enjoy following us around, which is pretty amazing.

CrypticRock.com: The band has a very strong following internationally. Your newest album, “Tears On Tape”, is really excellent. Personally I respectably think it’s one of the strongest albums of all your work. Tell me what the writing and recording process was for the new album?

Ville Valo: It was a bit of a pain in the butt. We started working with stuff in early 2011 and worked at the rehearsal place to get some ideas down. All of a sudden, our drummer, Mika “Gas Lipstick” Karppinen, started feeling severe pain in his hands. Everybody was kind of shocked and worried, thinking, “What the hell is going on?” He went to the doctor’s and found out he had some repetitive strain injury and some nerve damage as well. Nobody would actually know how long it would take him to heal up or whether he’s ever going to play drums again. In the middle of the start of “Tears On Tape”, we all of a sudden had to take a break for eight months to wait for him to get better. We utilized the eight months to work on the songs a hell of a lot more than maybe in the past. At the end of the day, I think it paid off. When Gas was fine again, and he got the A-OK from the doctor’s in May 2012, everybody was so relieved. That was a huge boost of confidence for everybody in the band. We started working at stuff straight away and worked our asses off May-August and went into the studio in September. It worked itself out pretty quick; it was about two and a half months of recording and your usual two weeks mixing and so forth. We have done that a couple of times in the past, so that part of it wasn’t really new. The toughest thing was to have the mood and setting right for the music.

CrypticRock.com: Finland is loaded with metal bands, ranging from black metal, to death metal, to gothic metal. Being from a country with such a strong metal scene, and especially so many gothic metal bands, what do you think the key to HIM‘s success is standing out above all these bands?

Ville Valo: I think that more or less the scene, as you said, has always been big, but there has never been a lot of bands doing exactly the “same old same old.” When we started out, there were bands like CHILDREN OF BODOM and NIGHTWISH and bands like that. I think all the bands have really strong identities of their own. Even though we were in the same scene more or less, all the bands sounded very different. We weren’t fighting; it was more of a family sort of thing rather than be bitter enemies.

CrypticRock.com: HIM‘s lyrical and music theme is very sorrowful and romantic. Tell me what inspires you to compose the lyrics and music?

Ville Valo: Yes, I think all good music has to come from a personal place. Again, it’s the combination of when we started out, we didn’t just want to play gothic rock or just want to do metal. We wanted to, if possible, mix all we love into this package called HIM. That’s probably the reason for the way we sound, good or bad. Songwriting-wise, I’m a huge Neil Young fan, Johnny Cash, DEPECHE MODE and all sorts of different acts. Usually we are into melancholy music, but I guess that’s very Scandinavian. We don’t listen to a lot of happy-go-lucky bullshit.

Read the entire interview at CrypticRock.com.

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Raymond Westland of Ghost Cult Magazine recently conducted an interview with renowned Canadian multi-instrumentalist, singer, songwriter and producer Devin Townsend. A couple of excerpts from the chat follow below.

Ghost Cult Magazine: Can you takes us through the motions of coming up with the concept behind “The Retinal Circus” to the point where you have actually performed it?

Devin: Sure. I’ve been making music for so long and the main hurdles I’ve run when dealing with any public exposure is that many of my projects are so different from each other. There is the cyber thrash/death metal stuff, pop, rock, silly music and everything in between. So when a new record is presented to record stores and magazines, people have difficulty with how to label my music. So when I signed on to the new management I have now, the main problem we were facing was in terms of how we should make my music more visible. What I said to them is that the aesthetics of each album may be different but the intention is the same and that’s being true to whatever I wanted to do. So they came up with the idea of using the platform of a circus to essentially present my back catalogue in some way to people in one space. The logistics of that took approximately a year and there were close to a 100 people involved with it. The whole thing was wrapped in a dubious story, but a story nonetheless, and all the things that went into articulating that. We worked on it up until the point of rehearsal. We essentially rehearsed the whole show with all the performers in a period of only two days due to financial restraints. That’s essentially how it went. It was chaos, then incredible chaos and then unbelievable chaos and then it was over. After that, it came down to mixing and coming up with the artwork and that was another hurdle to get over.

Ghost Cult Magazine: Given the little time and limited recources you managed to put on quite a show.

Devin: It went well, but it’s fair to keep in mind that I did a lot of editing, not only to the audio, but also to the video to try make it as close as possible. to the original vision behind “The Retinal Circus”. During the actual show, there were syncing issues with the video, people coming in at the wrong time and some of the gear went down. I had a debate whether it was more important to leave the show exactly as it was or to make it as close as possible to how I envisioned it. I decided to do the latter thing, because it’s my thing. Every time I put it on, I saw the mistakes and I viewed those mistakes as unneccessary distractions.

Ghost Cult Magazine: You also included two STRAPPING YOUNG LAD songs in the setlist. This is quite remarkable because you commented that the STRAPPING YOUNG LAD book is closed for you and that you moved on as an artist. Why this decision?

Devin: True, I’ve said that many times in interviews and it’s fairly well documented why I don’t want to do any new STRAPPING YOUNG LAD material anymore. I’m not ashamed of STRAPPING YOUNG LAD and it’s still a huge part of my life. The reason why I don’t want to do it anymore has more to do with people wanting to force me to do certain things and that’s absolutely the wrong way to approach me. The best way of me not doing things is to demand it from me. My nature in reacting to that is a big phat no. I have no interest in being told what to do. STRAPPING YOUNG LAD is a representation of me, just as much as “Ki”, “Ghost”, “Ziltoid” or “Infinity”. There’s no difference, it was just a different period of time. Including “Detox” and “Love?” on “The Retinal Circus”, seen from the point being it a retrospective, is just obvious to me.

Read the entire interview at Ghost Cult Magazine.

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Michelle Mills of the San Gabriel Valley Tribune recently spoke to BLACK SABBATH bassist Geezer Butler about the making of the band’s new album, “13” — the first in 35 years to feature Geezer, singer Ozzy Osbourne and guitarist Tony Iommi — and their current North American tour.

“For the first time in years, we’re finally doing some new material on stage with the new album we’ve got out,” Butler said. “It’s a definite change for us because it’s the first time in 30 years that we’ve actually come up with something new and the crowd is really loving it. It’s good playing it and it fits in really well with the old stuff.”

Butler also talked about the physical demands of touring and how being on the road has changed over the years.

“We take it a lot easier now — we do one show on and then we have a day off,” Butler said. “So we only play every other day and that keeps the whole thing much fresher instead of wearing ourselves out.”

Regarding the songwriting process for “13”, which earned the band its first No. 1 album in the U.S., Butler said: “In the past, we’d just go to a rehearsal situation and jam until we came out with something that we liked and then we’d work on that. But this time was different because when we got together, Tony had about 40 or 50 different riffs that he had written, so we were able to pick some of those riffs and immediately have a starting point on them.”

BLACK SABBATH will also be immortalized in an all-original, terrifying 3D maze, “Black Sabbath: 13 3D” at Universal Studios Hollywood‘s premier Halloween Horror Nights event, beginning September 20.

“They showed us the images of the maze, the drawings and photographs of the masks and the thing that they’re making for it and explained the whole structure of it,” Butler told the San Gabriel Valley Tribune. “It’s a maze and each part of the maze is based on particular lyrics from the old songs, so it’s really good, it’s really interesting. Once it’s built, we’re going out to visit it and have a tour of it. It will probably frighten us all to death.”

blacksabbathhorrornights_600

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Aniruddh “Andrew” Bansal of Metal Assault recently conducted an interview with renowned Canadian multi-instrumentalist, singer, songwriter and producer Devin Townsend. A couple of excerpts from the chat follow below.

Metal Assault: The last time we did an interview, it was September of last year and at the time you were telling me about this “Retinal Circus” show that you were going to do soon after. Here we are almost a year later, and you’re soon releasing a DVD of that show. First of all, for you what was that experience like, doing that show in London?

Devin: It was basically every emotion sort of wrapped up into one. Being perfectly honest, overall it was a really good experience but it was fraught with technical hurdles and I didn’t actually recognize what we had done until I started editing it. In hindsight, it’s great but at that time it was just a lot of stress.

Metal Assault: What kind of technical problems did you face?

Devin: Well, the ideas that I typically have for “Retinal Circus” or “Ziltoid” or any number of projects that I do are usually on such a scope that there’s no feasible way you can do it with the amount of money and time that we usually have. “Retinal” was an extreme version of that. There were a 100 people in our performing group, we had a day and a half worth of rehearsal, and overall, we did achieve what I had hoped to achieve from the show, but to get it to that point it was chaos. You can imagine when there are a 100 people, including circus performers, choir members and people that had no connection to what I’ve done or to the music itself. They had to become familiar with the music and being on our stage, and all these things that went into this three-hour performance. We had props, we were playing songs we’d never played before, and I think there were 50 or 60 wireless units going. Something as simple as trying to find the frequencies for the wireless units became a challenge when we had to go and do it amidst the chaos of pulling off something that was so bizarre. For me, on a personal level, narcissistic to the point of nausea, it was a heck of a thing! But ultimately, for me it was a success. I tend to be hyper-aware of what I do and what it is that I project into the audience, I real awkward sort of quasi-nerdy thing. So by doing “Retinal”, which was so awkward and so nerdy, it allowed me to kind of liberate that. It’s what people are going to say now, like, “OK, you’re an awkward and nerdy performer!” And I’m like, “Fuck yeah, of course! Look at this.” I’m not only doing a show that’s incredibly awkward and nerdy, but we put flames on it and a pop-up book in the release. I mean, fuck you, right?

Metal Assault: You also had a lot of special guests. I think Steve Vai narrated the whole event, and stuff like that. Could you talk about that a little bit, just for people who’re not aware of what to expect from this DVD in terms of guest musicians?

Devin: The whole “Retinal Circus” show is meant to be several things and one of the few things is, it’s a way for me to summarize 20 years of doing this professionally. During that 20-year period there were a lot of people that were pivotal in my life and in my music, between STRAPPING YOUNG LAD, Steve Vai, “Ocean Machine”, “Infinity”, etc etc. Typically, people either in media or the label or what have you, had a hard time finding ways to sell what I do because they can’t sell it to people as one thing or another. So for “The Retinal Circus”, I tried to include all of it in one place, wrap it up and try to include as many people from the past that I had worked with as I thought would be appropriate. And so, Steve Vai, obviously, is where I started in music and he was kind enough to narrate it. Then I had Anneke [Van Giersbergen, ex-THE GATHERING], and then I asked Jed from STRAPPING YOUNG LAD to come up. It was important for me to do STRAPPING YOUNG LAD in this, because there’s typically the notion that I’m ashamed of it or afraid of it. Absolutely not! STRAPPING YOUNG LAD is as much me as “Ghost” or “Ziltoid”. It was just then. So I included the SYL in order to make it as respectful as I could to the legacy of that band. Jed was the first member of STRAPPING before Gene [Hoglan, drums] and Byron [Stroud, bass], and it was a great experience for me to reconnect with him.

Metal Assault: Right, but after you did that, I think a lot of rumors started flying around and media outlets started asking you about a full reunion. That must have been kind of hard for you to deal with, right?

Devin: It’s not hard to deal with, but I think the only thing about talking to media that’s hard for me to deal with is me just being confused as to why people become obsessed by it. I truly don’t understand. But in the way I’ve understood it is, people have a connection to a particular period of their life that music played an important part in, and they believe that by bands reuniting, it’s going to in some ways provide them with that period of their life or that experience again. But it just doesn’t work that way. It really doesn’t! It’s been proven time and time again by bands that try and come out to reunite and rekindle those sorts of things. I’ve got no interest in it. And not only do I not have any interest, but the more people ask me, the less I want to do it. The surest way for me to not do something is for someone to try and force me to. So the more talk that people babble on about in terms of reunion and all that stuff, it just makes me laugh! Oh my God, really? Is that where you’re at with it? For me, people can talk as much as they want, but I do what I want and that’s the bottom line.

Read the entire interview at Metal Assault.

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Matt Bellamy says their recent Tokyo show was just a rehearsal for an epic new tour to celebrate two decades together.

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