Posts Tagged “Rock Pit”

The Rock Pit recently conducted an interview with guitarist Rob Cavestany of San Francisco Bay Area metallers DEATH ANGEL. A couple of excerpts from the chat follow below.

The Rock Pit: I wanted to ask you also about the [new DEATH ANGEL] album title, “The Dream Calls For Blood”. I get the impression that it signifies some kind of battle cry or something. What’s the meaning behind the name?

Rob: Yes, that is truly what it is; it’s a battle cry, but it’s also a mantra for us. Mark [Osegueda, vocalist] came up with that phrase when he wrote the lyrics for that song. I loved it when I read that. I was, like, “That’s awesome, brother. I can totally feel where you’re coming from,” and he’s representing our entire feeling about that which is for us, the dream is what we do. It’s our band, it’s keeping our band alive and staying in this musical world that we live to do and we have always done since we were little kids. That’s the dream, and the blood represents everything that you put into it, and I mean everything. The countless hours, the blood, sweat, the tears, the heart and soul, all the sacrifices that goes along with it. Without trying to sound like it’s all negative and dark, which it’s obviously not, but a lot of it is. There’s a lot that goes on behind the scenes. People don’t realize, nor do they really care to know about it, because it’s not really the important part, doesn’t have much to do with the music that they are listening to and stuff but if you want to know the fuel behind what drives something like this, and what pushes you to bring out these things, it’s just exactly that. And for us, it’s all the personal reality that we are experiencing going through being in this band. The curse and the blessing that music is to us and the dream is your goal. The thing that you are reaching, your goal. Everyone has one, or at least hopefully they do. Many people do and they do everything in their power to make it happen, and that’s what we do and we are just kinda pointing out. It’s like us just releasing and venting out what it is to us and also a message to others that it’s possible for other people to achieve their goals and their dreams but they have to put into it to get out of it.

The Rock Pit: In recent years, thrash metal seems to have gained quite a bit of interest with a lot of newer bands popping up and more fans getting into it. What’s your take on this resurgence of thrash metal?

Rob: I think it’s fucking amazing, man! It’s great and about time. It doesn’t surprise me, just because to me it’s a solid genre, or sub-genre of metal, it’s a solid brand of music. It’s timeless in its own way. Of course, there are aspects of it that are dated, just like anything else, but the style of music in and of itself, it has such elements that just makes the blood pump and it’s exciting and it’s got killer musicianship, but it’s got fucking loads of attitude and it’s street level. It can really relate, and especially to the youth, and that’s why we got turned on to it when we were so young. It’s exciting, and it has all those elements, and I’m just really glad to see that a lot of younger bands and a lot of people in general are, if they didn’t catch it the first time round, if they were too young or just weren’t paying attention, maybe now is the chance for them to latch on and taste the flavor of this music that’s called thrash. It’s fun, it’s a fucking killer time and there’s a lot to be gained from delving into it and letting it take over your mind and your soul.

Read the entire interview at The Rock Pit.

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On September 11, Andrew Schizodeluxe of The Rock Pit conducted an interview with guitarist/vocalist Mille Petrozza of German thrash metal veterans KREATOR. A couple of excerpts from the chat follow below.

The Rock Pit: Well, let’s talk about the new DVD, “Dying Alive”. How did the idea of this new DVD come about?

Mille: Basically, it was the middle of the tour that we felt it went very well, we had many people at the shows and we knew it was a huge production and we wanted to give fans something back, like the memory. We felt this was the perfect time after 10 years of our last official DVD release, “Live Kreation”. We felt it was about time to come out with a new live DVD/live record package and we talked to the record company about it and they supported us and went along. We got a team of 24 cameras into the Turbinenhalle in Oberhausen, which is very close to where we live, and we had full control over everything that happened to make sure that the quality was 100% guaranteed.

The Rock Pit: Watching the live show on the DVD, there seems to be so many cameras around, you seemed to have captured every angle possible. Was that the band’s idea or was that someone else’s idea?

Mille: That was our idea — ours and the director. We talked about this for a long time and we definitely wanted to make sure that… I mean, it’s always different to when you are in a room and watch a band, it’s a different feel than being in your living room and watching it from your sofa or whatever, so we wanted to make sure that we got an impression of what it’s like to come to a KREATOR show.

The Rock Pit: I ask this question with a few other thrash bands regarding the recent resurgence of thrash metal in general. Obviously, the genre has never gone away but it seems to have crept back in a big way recently, which we haven’t seen in quite some time. What’s your take on this new interest in the genre?

Mille: For me, it never felt like it went away. It quietened in the ’90s, but that was metal in general, but now it’s stronger than ever because people have grown up. A lot of the bands that have been around back then that are still around are a little more controlled with how they handle things and they are more experienced. It comes down to the music. Now they live by fans that have grown up with this kind of music. Back in the day, neighbors were like strangers to this music and so the whole industry has changed. In my opinion, it has a lot to do with self-confidence nowadays; it’s a whole different deal. Nowadays, we are more confident in what we do and I think I can speak for a lot of the bands, a lot of the old-school thrash bands that nowadays when you get the feedback from the new generation of bands, it gives you a lot of energy.

The Rock Pit: Obviously you did a bit of experimenting in the ’90s and then came back to the thrash sound. Do you think you would ever try a different direction again or do you think you will stay in the thrash genre?

Mille: I think we experiment within our music. In the ’90s, we experimented on a whole album, nowadays we experiment within certain parts of certain songs but people don’t see that experimenting as much as we did in the ’90s. A lot of the elements, like in “Phantom Antichrist”, for example, is something that we took from that era and put it into our new music, so it’s always in motion. Our music always develops and we can look back on many, many hours that we have tried, riffs or melodies that we tried in the ’90s and we still profit a lot from that. It was not for nothing, even though some of the ’90s experimental albums weren’t that well received by the audience, for us, musically, it made us grow.

Read the entire interview from The Rock Pit.

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The Rock Pit recently conducted an interview with Max Cavalera (SOULFLY, CAVALERA CONSPIRACY, SEPULTURA). A couple of excerps from the chat follow below.

The Rock Pit: I wanted to get straight into [SOULFLY‘s] upcoming album, “Savages”. I have been listening to a preview of it and I must say this sounds like a really big album for SOULFLY. It has a lot of the elements from previous albums. Tell us a bit about the idea behind this album.

Max: “Savages” is definitely a surprising album for us in that it’s the ninth album for SOULFLY and the first album with Terry Date producing the album. He’s a great producer. It’s the first album that my son plays drums on it. Zyon did a great job and we have some real nice guests like Neil [Fallon] from CLUTCH, Jamie [Hanks] from I DECLARE WAR and Mitch [Harris] from NAPALM DEATH are on the record. I really like the record. I think half of it is extreme like “Enslaved” was and the other half is really super groovy like early SOULFLY stuff like “Prophecy” and “Soulfly 1”. Stuff like “Bloodshed” and “Masters Of Savagery” and “Spiral” are killer groove songs, so I think it’s a great combination of this extreme and groove together which makes “Savages” a very powerful record.

The Rock Pit: Terry Date, who you have worked with before, you decided to work with him again; this time he produced the album. Why did you decide to work with him?

Max: Yeah, I worked with him on “Around The Fur”, the DEFTONES album from 1997, I believe, and I met Terry at that time and became good friends with him. He used to come to SOULFLY and sing “Policia” all the time and he mixed two of my other records, “Dark Ages” and “Conquer”, I believe, and we kept the friendship going through the years. I always said, “One day I’m going to record a whole record with you and you are going to produce.” When the time came for this one, I called him up and said, “Are you ready to do this, man?” and he was ready, and it was the best choice possible because I love the sound of the record. I think Terry did an amazing job on the sound. The drums sound fantastic, the guitars sound fantastic and it was such a pleasure working with Terry. He’s such a good guy, such a mellow guy in the studio, that made everyone at ease and gave everyone good confidence to make the best record possible. So I love working with Terry. I would definitely work with him again in the future.

The Rock Pit: One of the things that I have noticed with SOULFLY over the years is that each album is different, especially after [guitarist] Marc Rizzo joined the band. How much of an impact has he had with the changes over the years?

Max: Yeah, Marc is a big part of it. He’s been with us since 2004 and he’s a really killer guitar player. He adds his own real guitar accent and, of course, shredding, because he’s an amazing shredder. He’s just a great guy, but I think part of the motivation of SOULFLY going forward comes with the idea that Marc‘s in the band and we do a lot of things together. A lot of times I will do a riff and Marc will grab my riff and make it better, like update my riff. Make it a little cooler, a little more exciting, and that’s a great way to work when you can do it like that with a guy in the band who can do that. We have a system that really works and he loves being in SOULFLY; he’s one guy I don’t want to change in the band. That’s why he’s been with us since 2004 and I don’t think we are going to change for a long time. I hope he stays with me for a long time, because I think we have some kind of magic together that’s really killer. I love the fact that he’s in the band and that he does so much for SOULFLY.

Read the entire interview at The Rock Pit.

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The Rock Pit recently conducted an interview with renowned Canadian multi-instrumentalist, singer, songwriter and producer Devin Townsend. A couple of excerpts from the chat follow below.

The Rock Pit: I wanted to ask you about the “Retinal Circus”. Tell us a little bit about that.

Devin: “Retinal Circus” was an idea that took about a year to bring to fruition and what the basic thought behind it was the end period of the DEVIN TOWNSEND PROJECT with “Epicloud” and four records and all this. It seemed like appropriate use of our resources to make a show that essentially put it all in one place and gave us an opportunity to sort of make an overview of everything that I had done. And so “Retinal Circus” ended up being this really theatrical, very strange show that included elements of all my solo records more or less and some elements of STRAPPING YOUNG LAD and then it was wrapped up into a story, including Steve Vai. In a lot of ways, it was a real purge for me; it allowed me to represent the past, sort of confront the real nerdy elements of it and just make it larger than anything I’ve made. It was a cool experience.

The Rock Pit: It sounds almost like a theatrical version of a biography. Would you put it like that?

Devin: I guess so. I mean it’s a biography of the music rather than a biography of me. I think a biography of me would be pretty boring, but I mean, taking the musical end of it, I think it’s so up and down and all over the place that from the dynamics of the back catalogue, it was very easy to put together something theatrical. Yeah, I guess it would be a biography of my music, but maybe not directly of myself. Who knows?! Maybe it is.

The Rock Pit: I, unfortunately, missed your set at the Soundwave Festival last year but I did manage to catch you performing with GOJIRA, which looked like a lot of fun. You guys did a tour together?

Devin: That’s correct, yeah. As I get older, I find my connection to heavy music wanes in a lot of ways. If nothing else, there’s an element of heavy music that just no longer fits into my daily muse in terms of sound. But GOJIRA and MESHUGGAH are two bands that even within that, I still just have immense respect and awe for in a lot of ways, so the tour with GOJIRA was a great experience for me, to be able to hang out with people I like but also to watch them devastate every night. Really, it’s an astonishing thing.

The Rock Pit: Now you have such a huge varied back catalogue as well, how do you go about choosing a setlist for these shows?

Devin: Good question. I think it happens in several ways. There are certain songs that you play, and over the years as you play them, you find that these songs work, these ones don’t. These ones illicit a crowd reaction, these ones don’t. These ones may illicit a crowd reaction at a certain part in the set and not in another part of the set. So I think that setlists are built in a lot of ways by reflecting on how they succeeded and failed in the past and which circumstances. I think you also have to take into consideration what you have played in that territory before so if you’re doing a consequent tour of Australia, you wanna make sure that you’re not hitting them with just a different variation of the last tour. Otherwise there’s no reason for people to come and participate after a while.

Read the entire interview from The Rock Pit.

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The Rock Pit recently conducted an interview with renowned Canadian multi-instrumentalist, singer, songwriter and producer Devin Townsend. A couple of excerpts from the chat follow below.

The Rock Pit: I wanted to ask you about the “Retinal Circus”. Tell us a little bit about that.

Devin: “Retinal Circus” was an idea that took about a year to bring to fruition and what the basic thought behind it was the end period of the DEVIN TOWNSEND PROJECT with “Epicloud” and four records and all this. It seemed like appropriate use of our resources to make a show that essentially put it all in one place and gave us an opportunity to sort of make an overview of everything that I had done. And so “Retinal Circus” ended up being this really theatrical, very strange show that included elements of all my solo records more or less and some elements of STRAPPING YOUNG LAD and then it was wrapped up into a story, including Steve Vai. In a lot of ways, it was a real purge for me; it allowed me to represent the past, sort of confront the real nerdy elements of it and just make it larger than anything I’ve made. It was a cool experience.

The Rock Pit: It sounds almost like a theatrical version of a biography. Would you put it like that?

Devin: I guess so. I mean it’s a biography of the music rather than a biography of me. I think a biography of me would be pretty boring, but I mean, taking the musical end of it, I think it’s so up and down and all over the place that from the dynamics of the back catalogue, it was very easy to put together something theatrical. Yeah, I guess it would be a biography of my music, but maybe not directly of myself. Who knows?! Maybe it is.

The Rock Pit: I, unfortunately, missed your set at the Soundwave Festival last year but I did manage to catch you performing with GOJIRA, which looked like a lot of fun. You guys did a tour together?

Devin: That’s correct, yeah. As I get older, I find my connection to heavy music wanes in a lot of ways. If nothing else, there’s an element of heavy music that just no longer fits into my daily muse in terms of sound. But GOJIRA and MESHUGGAH are two bands that even within that, I still just have immense respect and awe for in a lot of ways, so the tour with GOJIRA was a great experience for me, to be able to hang out with people I like but also to watch them devastate every night. Really, it’s an astonishing thing.

The Rock Pit: Now you have such a huge varied back catalogue as well, how do you go about choosing a setlist for these shows?

Devin: Good question. I think it happens in several ways. There are certain songs that you play, and over the years as you play them, you find that these songs work, these ones don’t. These ones illicit a crowd reaction, these ones don’t. These ones may illicit a crowd reaction at a certain part in the set and not in another part of the set. So I think that setlists are built in a lot of ways by reflecting on how they succeeded and failed in the past and which circumstances. I think you also have to take into consideration what you have played in that territory before so if you’re doing a consequent tour of Australia, you wanna make sure that you’re not hitting them with just a different variation of the last tour. Otherwise there’s no reason for people to come and participate after a while.

Read the entire interview from The Rock Pit.

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The Rock Pit recently conducted an interview with bassist/vocalist Jeff Walker of reactivated British extreme metal pioneers CARCASS.

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Mark Diggins of The Rock Pit recently conducted an interview with drummer Mike Portnoy (ADRENALINE MOB, FLYING COLORS, THE WINERY DOGS, DREAM THEATER, AVENGED SEVENFOLD).

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The Rock Pit recently conducted an interview with guitarist Wolf Hoffmann of reformed heavy metal legends ACCEPT.

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Rage Against the Machine is back, this time representing a grassroots campaign  by the public to get Rage to the #1 spot on the Holiday music charts in the UK. The last time I heard, RATM had made it to #1! Whether or not they are holding true is another thing though, as their competition is yet another winner of the American Idol equivalent in the UK called The X Factor (and as we all know, those “artists” sell like hot cakes). Supporting this effort, Rock Pit has an exclusive interview and performance of “Killing In the Name Of.” Personally, this shows, as Tom Morello mentions in the interview segment, that there is an international “silent majority” of music fans who can rise against the mediocrity of soulless pop drivel. Check out the below link and support this cause, especially if you live in the UK!

http://www.rockpit.com/ratm/index.php

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